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Aug
15
comment When referring to a previously sent text, would you say 'I text you about that' or 'I texted you about that'?
I would have given you a +1 for the first part of your answer, but the last part where you say it is an alternative to use "text-messaged" is a reason to give -1, so I end up not voting on this. "To text" is a quite new use, which is a short form of "To send someone a text message". "To text-message" is not something that is used. The more formal version would rather be as @Rahul Narain said in his comment.
Aug
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
29
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
I like the Wikipedia section that indicates African origin. It looks to me that variants of different african expressions have this meaning, and may be the first seed to pick it up in modern english because of use by african slaves in America.
Jun
22
answered Does “filling out” equal to “filling in”?
Jun
20
comment What is the meaning of “Dick” when it is a person's name?
@Jon: I know a Richard from Ireland that actually signs his official company emails with Dick...
Jun
17
revised *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
Added reference to third as commented on question
Jun
17
answered *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
Jun
17
comment What is the meaning of “Dick” when it is a person's name?
When thinking of the fact that "dick" is slang for "penis" or "unkind person", it is very strange to me that people named Richard actually choose to use the nickname "Dick"!
May
27
comment What is a good, short, word to describe a software engineer?
...but you would probably not want to use the abbreviation SE on StackExchange sites, because everyone would think you refer to StackExchange...
May
18
comment What is a common expression in English that a person might say when one suddenly got shocked by sound?
I agree - it would probably be non-verbally, or as you say "aaaah" or some other type of scream that would probably not be language dependent anyway...
May
18
answered The difference between “require digit”, “requires a digit” and “requires digits”
Feb
3
comment Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
@Benjol: Sorry, I misunderstould your question. My opinion is really that you should not add smiley at all inside a parenthesis - integrated or not (unless its shown graphical like I said). Again, see xkcd.com/541 as referenced by Maxpm.
Feb
3
comment Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
@Benjol: If you know the receiver has graphic representation that shows the smiley as a small image rather than the :) it's OK, otherwise, no, it's not ok.
Feb
3
answered Is it acceptable to nest parentheses?
Feb
2
answered to give options to “if you do not mind <much?>”
Feb
2
comment Curriculum vitae: Proper qualifiers for skills
I feel that the last two is most relevant here. In years could be misleading (as an example, I have longer experience with C++ than VB, but I have by far more experience with VB, because that is what I have mainly worked with. I have only done some occational bug fixing in C++)
Feb
2
comment How to punctuate sentences like “I'm just calling a spade, a spade.”
By the way - is this a common saying in English? I know it is in Norwegian, but when I see it here in English, it looks strange...
Jan
12
awarded  Quorum
Jan
11
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
11
comment Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
But hard-disks are still common, which is also a magnetic storage media. I used floppy as example, because that was what was commented on in the referenced post.