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Jan
16
answered Word for something made of two parts
Jan
16
comment When and why should I use 'the'
Not necessarily (even though in this case it is). What I say is that Balford is one specific library (among other libraries), and that it is located in Oxford (just to be sure to get it right in case there are other libraries in the world that is also called "Balford").
Jan
16
answered When and why should I use 'the'
Jan
16
answered Would vs Will in future events
Nov
25
revised “More twisted than a neurotic pretzel”
Included the word "more" from the original reference to give more meaing to the phrase in the sitation
Nov
25
suggested approved edit on “More twisted than a neurotic pretzel”
Nov
18
comment Is two-thirds plural?
When the meaning of 2/3 is singular as in 1), should it then be said "two third" and not "two thirds" ? My point is that "s" as ending here indicates plural.
Nov
15
answered How did the silent 't' come into all these 'tch' words?
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce LINQ?
@SteinG.Strindhaug: The reason they insist on using the # (hash) symbol is that the ♯ (sharp) symbol is not represented on a standard computer keyboard. As for why they chose the name: The name "C sharp" was inspired by musical notation where a sharp indicates that the written note should be made a semitone higher in pitch. This is similar to the language name of C++, where "++" indicates that a variable should be incremented by 1.
Nov
4
comment How is SQL pronounced?
I say "pottit".
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce @[name] on Twitter?
"Tweet Tom" would be the right form, as Twitter has introduced as the way to say it.
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce @[name] on Twitter?
Just a note on the Twitter version: Twitter has introdueced a verb to use for this; "tweet". So your second line there would be "Tweet Tom for more information."
Nov
1
comment What is the difference between “nothing but”, “anything but”, and “everything but”?
"All but" is slightly different, and is discussed in other questions: “He all but (did something)”, “All but” idiom has two meanings? and “to be all but X”. It means "very nearly".
Nov
1
comment Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
@RedGrittyBrick: You are probably right, but the 3.5-inch are still called "floppy" because it's a cool name, and it's no need for a new name for it just because it's not that floppy anymore. And "stiffy" might give unwanted assosiations to other things...
Oct
17
awarded  Good Question
Oct
17
revised Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
Changed the title to reflect a more general aspect of the question. (Someone edited it to that direction, but ended up too general)
Oct
17
awarded  Cleanup
Oct
17
revised Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
rolled back to a previous revision
Oct
15
awarded  Yearling
Aug
15
awarded  Critic