1,264 reputation
716
bio website stackexchange.com/users/…
location Norway
age 39
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Aug 29 at 12:00

I am a senior software developer.

My StackFlare

I am interested in .NET programming (C#, VB), web programming (ASP.NET, Javascript) and GUI design.

The chat room I most frequently visit is Musical Practice & Performance.


Nov
15
answered How did the silent 't' come into all these 'tch' words?
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce LINQ?
@SteinG.Strindhaug: The reason they insist on using the # (hash) symbol is that the ♯ (sharp) symbol is not represented on a standard computer keyboard. As for why they chose the name: The name "C sharp" was inspired by musical notation where a sharp indicates that the written note should be made a semitone higher in pitch. This is similar to the language name of C++, where "++" indicates that a variable should be incremented by 1.
Nov
4
comment How is SQL pronounced?
I say "pottit".
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce @somebody for Twitter?
"Tweet Tom" would be the right form, as Twitter has introduced as the way to say it.
Nov
4
comment How to pronounce @somebody for Twitter?
Just a note on the Twitter version: Twitter has introdueced a verb to use for this; "tweet". So your second line there would be "Tweet Tom for more information."
Nov
1
comment What is the difference between “nothing but”, “anything but”, and “everything but”?
"All but" is slightly different, and is discussed in other questions: “He all but (did something)”, “All but” idiom has two meanings? and “to be all but X”. It means "very nearly".
Nov
1
comment Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
@RedGrittyBrick: You are probably right, but the 3.5-inch are still called "floppy" because it's a cool name, and it's no need for a new name for it just because it's not that floppy anymore. And "stiffy" might give unwanted assosiations to other things...
Oct
17
awarded  Good Question
Oct
17
revised Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
Changed the title to reflect a more general aspect of the question. (Someone edited it to that direction, but ended up too general)
Oct
17
awarded  Cleanup
Oct
17
revised Is there a difference between “disc” and “disk” for naming digital storage media?
rolled back to a previous revision
Oct
15
awarded  Yearling
Aug
15
awarded  Critic
Aug
15
comment When referring to a previously sent text, would you say 'I text you about that' or 'I texted you about that'?
I would have given you a +1 for the first part of your answer, but the last part where you say it is an alternative to use "text-messaged" is a reason to give -1, so I end up not voting on this. "To text" is a quite new use, which is a short form of "To send someone a text message". "To text-message" is not something that is used. The more formal version would rather be as @Rahul Narain said in his comment.
Aug
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
29
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
I like the Wikipedia section that indicates African origin. It looks to me that variants of different african expressions have this meaning, and may be the first seed to pick it up in modern english because of use by african slaves in America.
Jun
22
answered Does “filling out” equal to “filling in”?
Jun
20
comment What is the meaning of “Dick” when it is a person's name?
@Jon: I know a Richard from Ireland that actually signs his official company emails with Dick...
Jun
17
revised *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?
Added reference to third as commented on question
Jun
17
answered *Getting on one's nerves*, *last nerve* or *third nerve*?