271 reputation
14
bio website
location San Francisco, CA
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen yesterday

I'm a hybrid programmer / web designer / psychology researcher. I'm currently doing internet-based psychological interventions with a University of California health research lab, trying to help folks learn skills for creating positive emotions and coping with stress effectively.

I also help non-technologically-inclined researchers and administrators manage and collate large datasets. Munging unruly text files may not be glamorous, but you'd be surprised how often it's what gets the science done.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Sep
17
comment Adverbs position in English: “place–manner–time” or “manner–place–time”?
The sentence "No child should grow up in America in poverty in the 21st century" runs the risk of derailing listeners. You get halfway through and it sounds like you're saying no child should have to grow up in America.
Sep
17
awarded  Commentator
Sep
17
comment What does “It's not me, it's you?” mean in the phrase, “So why are more of us telling our banks, “It's not me, it's you?”
But the commercial reverses it. "It's not you, it's me" is a way of telling the other person that they're not at fault for the relationship ending. You're taking responsibility for it. The ad says that not only should we be breaking up with our banks, we should be telling them it's their fault. They messed things up (e.g., our retirement funds, the housing market, the global economy...).
Jul
15
comment Are “heterosexual” and “straight” exact synonyms?
I more commonly hear "vanilla" used as the opposite of "kinky," probably because it avoids this ambiguity. It's a shame because "straight" and "kinky" make a better pair of metaphors.
Jul
13
comment How to express a risk of breaking a target/objective
I believe that "ultimatum" is usually used when the person is making a threat. It's not appropriate when they're warning about a natural consequence of doing (or failing to do) something.
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
I agree, and upvoted your answer. But there are cases where it is genuinely ambiguous (e.g., poker night with your landlord pals), so having a way to disambiguate in both directions is still useful.
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
In practice, outside of a landlord-related context, "rent" is almost always used in the tenant sense. It's probably safe to use it that way and only add clarification if you're using it in the landlord sense.
Jul
12
comment How to avoid ambiguity in “I am renting an apartment in New York”?
This helps, but it's not a complete solution. The tenant also needs a phrase that allows them to avoid ambiguity.
Mar
4
comment Something causes a lot of initiatives
I think it's fine, personally.
Mar
4
answered Something causes a lot of initiatives
Mar
4
awarded  Supporter
Mar
4
comment How do you refer to someone who has access to an abundance of resources?
Why not "their skills, availability, and resources"?
Mar
3
comment How do you refer to someone who has access to an abundance of resources?
I was just thinking about commenting that the phrasing of the title was a little bit off. Thanks for editing!
Mar
3
answered How do you refer to someone who has access to an abundance of resources?
Mar
3
answered “Rounded”, “heaping” and other types of teaspoon(fuls)?
Mar
2
comment “Least expensive” vs “most inexpensive”
I agree, "lease expensive" is a common way of phrasing things and "most inexpensive" -- while logically equivalent -- sounds like legalese or marketing talk. I couldn't tell you why your pharmacist preferred it, though it doesn't sound like he was being misleading.
Jan
18
awarded  Teacher
Jan
18
answered How to say 'Thirty minutes away by foot'?