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  • 35 votes cast
Apr
9
accepted How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters
Mar
3
comment How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters
Thanks for the feedback, folks. I've opted to go with the second option as it's more "generally" correct even though it doesn't follow the idiosyncratic format the company typically uses in press releases. The name itself is not an initialism (like IBM) or a shortened form (MS for Microsoft). As for the letter itself it was a cover letter for a job application hence the need for it to be as correct as possible. If anyone wants to wrap this discussion up in an answer, I'll be happy to accept it, or if it's not sufficiently applicable for general use feel free to delete it.
Feb
19
comment How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters
So it would be better to stick to the style of material written by the company rather than the style used by third parties such as media outlets? (@djna, @andi)
Feb
19
revised How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters
added 2 characters in body
Feb
19
asked How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters
Jan
9
awarded  Yearling
Jan
9
awarded  Yearling
Jan
31
awarded  Scholar
Jan
31
accepted If this isn't irony, what is it?
Jan
31
comment If this isn't irony, what is it?
right. I really shouldn't do this at 23:30. :P That's probably why the definition didn't seem to fit when I read it on the website.
Jan
31
awarded  Student
Jan
31
comment If this isn't irony, what is it?
you mean "shows signs of poor effort"?
Jan
31
answered Why do some people pronounce 'a' as 'u'?
Jan
31
asked If this isn't irony, what is it?
Jan
25
answered “Related work” or “related works”
Jan
21
answered Name to distinguish between parameters used for 'is not equal' operations and those used for 'is equal' operations
Jan
21
comment Name to distinguish between parameters used for 'is not equal' operations and those used for 'is equal' operations
You may find you get more traction by placing "possible answers" within the body of your question, or as a comment below, and allow the respondents to populate answers based on the information you provide.
Jan
21
comment Name to distinguish between parameters used for 'is not equal' operations and those used for 'is equal' operations
Depending on your context using the words "including" and "excluding" will work too.
Jan
16
answered Meaning of a sentence
Jan
12
awarded  Enlightened