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Aug
22
answered Describe someone who doesn't want anything better to happen to anyone else
Jun
26
accepted How are the words 'Suburb' and 'Superb' related to 'Superbas'?
Jun
25
comment How are the words 'Suburb' and 'Superb' related to 'Superbas'?
My fault. I had the word “Superba” (a local street name, to confuse things further) but just edited it to the correct word, which is still in the question title. Thanks for answering. I'll leave the question open for a bit to see if someone can shed further light as to the specifics of 1900s fans and a NY understanding.
Jun
25
revised How are the words 'Suburb' and 'Superb' related to 'Superbas'?
added 1 character in body
Jun
25
asked How are the words 'Suburb' and 'Superb' related to 'Superbas'?
Jun
6
accepted What's the best term for a cognitive state where you can't quite build the components up to achieve the solution?
Jun
6
comment What's the best term for a cognitive state where you can't quite build the components up to achieve the solution?
Sounds by far the best so far. Thank you!
Jun
2
comment Why do we say 'Salt to taste'?
Why is it worded that way? ..There's no accounting for taste.
Jun
1
accepted Use of the word “presently”?
May
31
accepted Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
May
31
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
JOE BLOW is the man. Since no one here has come up with it, I'm forced to reconsider, and am now thinking I must have gotten my wires crossed. I'm thinking now what must have happened is Clark Gable or someone said “belay that order”, and I looked it up just out of curiosity and was surprised to see what “belay” meant. It was no doubt the order itself that was menacing and violent. Probably, what? Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)? Yikes. Sorry folks!!
May
31
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
I already acknowledged that below. I'll give it a day or whatever to see if someone can come in and save the day, but otherwise Josh will win the check-mark. (Or am I supposed to put all my extra comments up into the body of the OP?) I realize that many want that check-mark granted now, need that check-mark granted now - but "No". Not yet. : )
May
31
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
@Dan – great call - as is the related Fid - but not what I was thinking of. At considerable risk of being wrong, I think my mystery word might begin with a “T” - or at least all the not-quite words running through my head start with T.
May
30
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
@Christopher - Good call though; looking now at the etymology of bludgeon.
May
30
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
@Christopher - Nope, but thank you ..for taking a swing!
May
30
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
Also - I may have gotten the question entirely wrong, but I think the word I'm looking for has come to mean more of a menacing and violent object, if perhaps tongue-in-cheek. “I'll belaying-pin you.” doesn't work.
May
30
comment Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
… That is exactly what I asked for. But it's a different word. Maybe there is a hierarchy of different types of belaying pins? Or an older term? Drats.
May
30
asked Old nautical word for the wooden pin you tie sail ropes to?
May
17
accepted What is the etymology of the Baseball term “meat hand”?
May
17
accepted Is the word “etymology” correct when looking for the origins of a phrase?