472 reputation
1414
bio website accelerando.euweb.cz
location Prague, Czech Republic
age 52
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jun 17 at 7:00

Senior developer, algorithms master, PM, analyst, applied mathematician.

The Three Little Daughters Raiser

Hobbies:
logics, history, psychology, sociology, pedagogics, photo, cycling, hiking.

In past:
space-/astro- geodesist, cartographer, astronomer, teacher, radiometrist on the liquidation of the Chernobyl catastrophe in 1986.


Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
17
awarded  Caucus
Mar
4
awarded  Famous Question
Feb
23
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
I was asking, what are the equivalents for the old cock-hen-chicken? And many "answers" don't even try to be the full ones. I had to ask each of you to put here the whole answer. Now you have it for Br. En., as I understand. So, +1 and thank you. Sorry, I won't move the answer check, even if I am interested in Br.En. more, for you are not the first.
Feb
23
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
Could you, please put this as an answer. Really, I am fascinated - not a single person managed to answer the question, either correctly or not. You all are answering some your own thoughts.
Feb
23
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
OK, thank you. And what about hen/chicken and chicken/chick? Is the old sequence cock-hen-chicken correct nowadays in British English?
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
@AndrewLeach Yes, I haven't thought about this variant! But I was reacting on "Cocks not roosters, as they lack a roost". Here "roost' is a noun, not verb.
Feb
6
revised What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
added 7 characters in body
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
And what about the movie "Chicken Run", where a hen says: "And we are chickens!", and according to context, it means definitely females ?
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
How could they have no roost - roost is merely a place for sleeping?
Feb
6
comment What is the difference between “rooster” vs. “cock” and “hen” vs. “chicken”?
+1. I like logic explanations, too. Maybe they are not real in linguistics, but even so they are excellent as a memo rule.
Jan
31
comment see with clear eye or see clearly
I have nothing against your point of view, but both are usable and correct, aren't they?
Jan
31
comment see with clear eye or see clearly
"see with clear eyes" - 155k instances in Google. "see with clear eye" - 30k more. "sees with clear eyes" - 40K more. While "see clearly" - 1400k. Of course, "see with clear eyes" is a nice metaphor and not used by everybody everyday. I think, it comes from Tenisson "See with clear eye some hidden shame"
Jan
31
revised see with clear eye or see clearly
added 237 characters in body
Jan
31
answered see with clear eye or see clearly
Jan
29
comment Is there a pair (at least) of really absolute synonyms in English?
As you see, not only different places, but also different animals.
Jan
29
comment Is there a pair (at least) of really absolute synonyms in English?
Oh, I have found an article on the subject. bobinoz.com/blog/4013/…. Foolish me, it were not N and S America, but America and Australia.
Jan
29
comment Is there a pair (at least) of really absolute synonyms in English?
As for (o)possum, I am sure, but I'll try to find the book and check.
Jan
29
comment Is there a pair (at least) of really absolute synonyms in English?
Free dictionary IS sure. And who am I to argue with it. (on capsulise/ze, I mean)
Jan
29
comment Is there a pair (at least) of really absolute synonyms in English?
@virmaior Then it depends on the definition, if we call two names with empty subjects equal or not. Are "The current king of France" and "The last natural number" equal? I think, no, they should have no sense, too.