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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 23 votes cast
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
Except that damn is a verb, not an adjective. It is used interchangeably with damned simply because people do not enunciate the d at the end, which makes damned sound like damn. It is the same reason that the Internet generation keeps writing should of, would of, and could of. Yes, some dictionaries include damn as an adjective, but that’s all the more troubling. Just because lots of people do something wrong does not make it correct or acceptable.
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@Dusty, oops, I misplaced the not. Just a second; I’ll fix it…
Feb
21
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
For the record, I have since capitalized it only when referring to the location.
Feb
21
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
@hit-and-run-downvoter, I don’t even care that you didn’t bother to explain why you down-voted because I haven’t even checked this question in a long time; so congratulations, you accomplished nothing whatsoever.
Oct
3
comment Is there a symbol for “and/or”?
Hmm, I don’t understand the confusion. I see it as clearly meaning one or more. The main problem comes when stringing together more than two items in that manner; it becomes quite unwieldy.
Sep
17
comment Use of “deadpool” as a verb
You're thinking of a death pool (more specifically, a celebrity death pool).
Sep
4
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
That’s strange. I too only saw one pronunciations when I first looked at the page. o.O Thanks for pointing it out.
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
Hmm, I saw the IPA at the top of the Greek muse Wiki page, but there was none for the musical instrument. I didn’t think it might be present later in the article (I have only ever seen it at the top, but I guess if the pronunciation is noteworthy, it would have its own section). I’ll chalk it up to there indeed being two pronunciations (though all the sites I checked only listed one).
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, right, the lady was selling a ancient, mythical Greek muse. :roll: (Besides, even if I were talking about the proper noun, where do you think I got the IPA in the above question? Or maybe you think the name is pronounced cal-i-ope.)
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, if someone has never seen “Bill” before and pronounced it as Bile or as Beel (i is pronounced as ee in many/most languages), it does not mean an attack, nor a speech impediment; they are just pronouncing it phonetically (just like I did with Penelope when I was a child). Either way, there is a correct pronunciation and there is nothing arrogant about that. Some words have multiple pronunciations, but this one does not. I checked several sites and they all listed just one; and you have not provided a source showing another. (Besides, I never said it was correct or incorrect.)
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, if someone pronounced your name Bile, I doubt that you would accept it and not call it wrong.
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@tchrist, that’s what I thought, but then why would they keep pronouncing it like that after they heard head it pronounced correctly?
Jul
9
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
In English, "stupid" is considered much more insulting than "fool".
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
@W.N., also in regards to the classic fool in the form of a court-jester.
Jul
2
comment Word for partner you are living with but not married to
Note, most jurisdictions often necessitate cohabitating for a certain amount of time (usually a few years) for a common-law marriage to have legal standing. Of course there’s nothing stopping people from using it informally.
Jun
24
comment Is there a symbol for “and/or”?
Yes, as a programmer, I am familiar with logical operators. I was wondering more about something that would be used in prose to avoid verbose sentences of the form one of this or that or this or that but not both.
Jun
24
comment Is there a symbol for “and/or”?
> The virgule is used only when indicating a line break in an inline quotation. That may once have been, but today it is just a synonym for slash.
Jun
1
comment Is there an antonym for “capitalize” (as in letter-case)
Hehe, very funny. :-P
Jan
8
comment Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark
That’s fine with really short things, but it would be incredibly unwieldy and illegible with long things like URLs, but even with shorter things like words or phrases.
Jan
8
comment Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark
I thought of that but the question mark is displaced by a significant amount, especially with a longer URL. And it does not address a list. Did you mean this http://foobar.baz/blah/someone/site/search?query=something&width=1024&height=768‌​;q=5&otherstuff=somethingelse;flashvars=one%20other%25thing%226?