771 reputation
21021
bio website synetech.dyndns.org
location Canada
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Apr 15 at 0:55

In addition to my own studies (reading Strunk and White as well as numerous other books on grammar, style, and typography), I have studied language and linguistics in University including courses on linguistics and psychology of language.

I intend to someday (get around to) create the ultimate language that is efficient, easy to learn and use and beautiful to speak and write. Yes, it’s it a laudable and lofty goal, but one can hope…


Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
"Could care less" actually occurs more frequently. So does ermahgerd,OMGlol. g2gcyal8r these days, but that isn’t any more correct than saying something is the opposite of what you mean (without purposely and knowingly meaning to be ironic). No fluent speaker will have any trouble understanding what you mean. The Oxford English Dictionary lists both with the same meaning. Maybe in person because familiarity, tone, inflection, context, and body-language can help, but what about in plain text? What about in Twitter or Facebook? What about from someone you don’t know?
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
Perhaps this is a meta issue in that precisely those people who say "could care less" could not indeed care less whether they are speaking logically or not. I have a sinking feeling that this could become more and more normal as the illiterate Internet generation grows up. :-(
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
I've heard it said that "could care less" is meant to be ironic, but I think this is just justification for the bastardisation of an English phrase. Yes, thank you! I’ve also heard that it is meant to be sarcastic, but that is BS because you cannot use that sarcastically or ironically, it just doesn’t work like actual ironic statements, and certainly not when used with the tone that anyone who has ever said it has used. It is definitely just another example of illiterate people trying to obstinately defend their ignorance instead of acknowledging it and trying to learn something.
Dec
1
comment Use of 'as per' vs 'per'
english.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
There is no such thing as de jure in language @JanusBahsJacquet, tell that to English teachers (and the kids that get bad grades in class).
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@JanusBahsJacquet, de facto ≠ de jure.
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
Except that damn is a verb, not an adjective. It is used interchangeably with damned simply because people do not enunciate the d at the end, which makes damned sound like damn. It is the same reason that the Internet generation keeps writing should of, would of, and could of. Yes, some dictionaries include damn as an adjective, but that’s all the more troubling. Just because lots of people do something wrong does not make it correct or acceptable.
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@Dusty, oops, I misplaced the not. Just a second; I’ll fix it…
Feb
21
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
For the record, I have since capitalized it only when referring to the location.
Feb
21
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
@hit-and-run-downvoter, I don’t even care that you didn’t bother to explain why you down-voted because I haven’t even checked this question in a long time; so congratulations, you accomplished nothing whatsoever.
Oct
3
comment Is there a symbol for “and/or”?
Hmm, I don’t understand the confusion. I see it as clearly meaning one or more. The main problem comes when stringing together more than two items in that manner; it becomes quite unwieldy.
Sep
17
comment Use of “deadpool” as a verb
You're thinking of a death pool (more specifically, a celebrity death pool).
Sep
4
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
That’s strange. I too only saw one pronunciations when I first looked at the page. o.O Thanks for pointing it out.
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
Hmm, I saw the IPA at the top of the Greek muse Wiki page, but there was none for the musical instrument. I didn’t think it might be present later in the article (I have only ever seen it at the top, but I guess if the pronunciation is noteworthy, it would have its own section). I’ll chalk it up to there indeed being two pronunciations (though all the sites I checked only listed one).
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, right, the lady was selling a ancient, mythical Greek muse. :roll: (Besides, even if I were talking about the proper noun, where do you think I got the IPA in the above question? Or maybe you think the name is pronounced cal-i-ope.)
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, if someone has never seen “Bill” before and pronounced it as Bile or as Beel (i is pronounced as ee in many/most languages), it does not mean an attack, nor a speech impediment; they are just pronouncing it phonetically (just like I did with Penelope when I was a child). Either way, there is a correct pronunciation and there is nothing arrogant about that. Some words have multiple pronunciations, but this one does not. I checked several sites and they all listed just one; and you have not provided a source showing another. (Besides, I never said it was correct or incorrect.)
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@BillFranke, if someone pronounced your name Bile, I doubt that you would accept it and not call it wrong.
Sep
2
comment Regional pronunciation of “calliope”?
@tchrist, that’s what I thought, but then why would they keep pronouncing it like that after they heard head it pronounced correctly?
Jul
9
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
In English, "stupid" is considered much more insulting than "fool".
Jul
2
comment An inoffensive word for “stupid”?
@W.N., also in regards to the classic fool in the form of a court-jester.