821 reputation
31223
bio website synetech.dyndns.org
location Canada
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 22 at 22:30

In addition to my own studies (reading Strunk and White as well as numerous other books on grammar, style, and typography), I have studied language and linguistics in University including courses on linguistics and psychology of language.

I intend to someday (get around to) create the ultimate language that is efficient, easy to learn and use and beautiful to speak and write. Yes, it’s it a laudable and lofty goal, but one can hope…


May
18
comment Ambiguity when a sentence contains multiple possessive pronouns
I was thinking that Billy’s friend and Billy’s father were there. sounded too verbose. I suppose that removing the “his” could actually help. That’s not bad.
May
18
asked Is there a better / correct term for the de facto usage of ‘ironic’?
May
18
asked Ambiguity when a sentence contains multiple possessive pronouns
Apr
22
comment What is the correct way to pronounce 'router'?
@Martin, you do realize that a lot of people pronounce travel lines like route 66 as r-out right? I don’t think I’ve ever heard of an airplane being re-rooted, only re-r-outed.
Apr
9
comment Using the gerund two times in a row
@John Assymptoth, He was considering running for office. She was avoiding telling him. I ended up stopping watching it.
Mar
22
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
22
asked Advice for using multiple same-gender personal pronouns in the same sentence
Mar
22
comment Tendency of using pronouns 'she/her' when talking about a random person
Agreed. The usage of female pronouns in texts started becoming more common with the explosion of the political-correctness movement of the late 90’s. As mentioned, it does feel more specific (as though it is referring to a specific female) than when the masculine is used which feels more generic.
Mar
22
comment Proper/official pronunciation of “conch”
Now that you mention it, a recent episode of Top Chef used conch as the main ingredient and every single person (four contestants, four judges, and several guests) all pronounced it “conk”.
Mar
5
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
@vgv8, role-playing-game like Dungeons & Dragons or World of Warcraft. Fantasy things like those tend to have multiple planes, dimensions, worlds, heavens, hells, etc.
Mar
3
comment Proper/official pronunciation of “conch”
Hearing conch pronounced like church somehow makes it sound “American”, as though the speaker is less educated, similar to when (and I’ve only ever heard Americans pronounce it like this) the second ‘g’ in garage is said as ‘j’ (as in jump) as opposed to the ‘zh’ sound that everyone else uses.
Mar
3
comment Proper/official pronunciation of “conch”
Well, I went to school in Canada, and that’s where I first heard it, in second grade. Matthew Perry was born in Massachusetts, but grew up in Ottawa, then moved to L.A. at 15. I suppose he could have heard the word for the first time when he was older in America.
Mar
3
comment Proper/official pronunciation of “conch”
Dang, I was hoping it derives from another language (Hawaiian?) that would make give a conclusive pronunciation.
Mar
3
asked Proper/official pronunciation of “conch”
Mar
2
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
@Jasper Loy, but then so is My House. :-)
Mar
2
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
The equator isn’t really a specific place, but rather a general area because it encompasses a wide range of location. Then again the Prime Meridian or International Date Line are similar (albeit smaller and more specific)…
Mar
2
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
@Mehrdad, knock it off Cartman.
Mar
1
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
1
asked Ordering of multiple, consecutive adjectives
Mar
1
comment Is there a standard ordering for the question mark and the exclamation mark used together?
That the order of ‘?!’ occurs about twice as often as the opposite makes sense. The sentence is after all fundamentally a question. The exclamation modifies the sentence less than the interrogative does, and so feels more natural to be secondary. I suppose a sentence could exist which is more exclamation and the inquisitive aspect is secondary, in which case reversing the punctuations would make sense—if I can managed to think of one I’ll post it.