771 reputation
21021
bio website synetech.dyndns.org
location Canada
age 35
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Apr 15 at 0:55

In addition to my own studies (reading Strunk and White as well as numerous other books on grammar, style, and typography), I have studied language and linguistics in University including courses on linguistics and psychology of language.

I intend to someday (get around to) create the ultimate language that is efficient, easy to learn and use and beautiful to speak and write. Yes, it’s it a laudable and lofty goal, but one can hope…


Dec
14
accepted Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark
Dec
14
comment Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark
I like the note about colon usage in terms of lists, but I don’t think it applies to the first case (introduction of a specific piece of related information). I already make a habit of putting URLs on a separate, indented line.
Dec
13
asked Sentences ending with both a colon and a question mark
Dec
13
answered What are the names of the pieces of a question mark?
Dec
5
revised “Everything is not…”
Removed nags to placate the naggers.
Dec
4
comment “Everything is not…”
Hehe, I guess I took your advice. :-D
Dec
4
comment “Everything is not…”
@Manhnax, would the question be any better if the words “really annoyed” were removed? Suddenly/magically the question becomes valid? It’s a simple question: is it legitimate grammar? would an English teacher complain?
Dec
4
comment “Everything is not…”
> Your perception is incorrect @Peter, well it is a subject perception. I had heard few, if any times for a few decades then pretty much every week (at least on screen).
Dec
4
comment “Everything is not…”
> If you want to annoy people using it, misunderstood them. Huh?
Dec
4
asked “Everything is not…”
Nov
9
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Oct
1
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
26
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
> the plural of fly (as noun) can be flies or fly, Huh? So I may have seen five fly? o.O > boy and boys, day and days Good point, but I wasn’t talking universally. > Just be happy that you don't have to learn two sets of rules. Technically yes, you don’t have to learn two sets of rules, you have to learn four inconsistent sets of rules: two for pluralizing nouns that end in -y, and two for 3rd-person verbs.
Aug
25
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
@kiamlaluno, again, that is a noun and you are pluralizing it. I don’t care about nouns or plurals. I’m talking about the 3rd-person verb.
Aug
25
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
Ross is correct.
Aug
25
asked Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
Jun
3
comment Is “Didn't used to have been” a valid structure?
@Robusto, @Colin, actually, I’d say it’s because didn’t use to is hard to use in a real sentence. It sounds okay on its own, but it does not fit in an actual sentence; you would have to insert an “it” or something: didn’t use it to….
May
19
accepted Is there a better / correct term for the de facto usage of ‘ironic’?
May
19
comment Is there a better / correct term for the de facto usage of ‘ironic’?
So they’re dilettantes as well? Okay then; thanks.