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  • 0 posts edited
  • 1 helpful flag
  • 23 votes cast
Jun
28
asked Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
Jun
18
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
3
awarded  Famous Question
May
11
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
@supercat, yes, and many gardens on Earth are filled with earth every spring, but nobody borrows a cup of hell or drives a hell or has a hell-sandwich.
May
11
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
Take care because most people understand RPG as "Rocket-Propelled Grenade" @Genady, yes, but context + common-sense/Google = no confusion.
Apr
14
answered How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?
Feb
27
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
28
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
"Could care less" actually occurs more frequently. So does ermahgerd,OMGlol. g2gcyal8r these days, but that isn’t any more correct than saying something is the opposite of what you mean (without purposely and knowingly meaning to be ironic). No fluent speaker will have any trouble understanding what you mean. The Oxford English Dictionary lists both with the same meaning. Maybe in person because familiarity, tone, inflection, context, and body-language can help, but what about in plain text? What about in Twitter or Facebook? What about from someone you don’t know?
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
I've heard it said that "could care less" is meant to be ironic, but I think this is just justification for the bastardisation of an English phrase. Yes, thank you! I’ve also heard that it is meant to be sarcastic, but that is BS because you cannot use that sarcastically or ironically, it just doesn’t work like actual ironic statements, and certainly not when used with the tone that anyone who has ever said it has used. It is definitely just another example of illiterate people trying to obstinately defend their ignorance instead of acknowledging it and trying to learn something.
Dec
1
comment Use of 'as per' vs 'per'
english.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Dec
1
awarded  Informed
Nov
12
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
There is no such thing as de jure in language @JanusBahsJacquet, tell that to English teachers (and the kids that get bad grades in class).
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@JanusBahsJacquet, de facto ≠ de jure.
Jun
13
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
26
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question