821 reputation
31223
bio website synetech.dyndns.org
location Canada
age 36
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Oct 22 at 22:30

In addition to my own studies (reading Strunk and White as well as numerous other books on grammar, style, and typography), I have studied language and linguistics in University including courses on linguistics and psychology of language.

I intend to someday (get around to) create the ultimate language that is efficient, easy to learn and use and beautiful to speak and write. Yes, it’s it a laudable and lofty goal, but one can hope…


Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
"Could care less" actually occurs more frequently. So does ermahgerd,OMGlol. g2gcyal8r these days, but that isn’t any more correct than saying something is the opposite of what you mean (without purposely and knowingly meaning to be ironic). No fluent speaker will have any trouble understanding what you mean. The Oxford English Dictionary lists both with the same meaning. Maybe in person because familiarity, tone, inflection, context, and body-language can help, but what about in plain text? What about in Twitter or Facebook? What about from someone you don’t know?
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
I've heard it said that "could care less" is meant to be ironic, but I think this is just justification for the bastardisation of an English phrase. Yes, thank you! I’ve also heard that it is meant to be sarcastic, but that is BS because you cannot use that sarcastically or ironically, it just doesn’t work like actual ironic statements, and certainly not when used with the tone that anyone who has ever said it has used. It is definitely just another example of illiterate people trying to obstinately defend their ignorance instead of acknowledging it and trying to learn something.
Dec
1
comment Use of 'as per' vs 'per'
english.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Dec
1
awarded  Informed
Nov
12
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
There is no such thing as de jure in language @JanusBahsJacquet, tell that to English teachers (and the kids that get bad grades in class).
Aug
31
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@JanusBahsJacquet, de facto ≠ de jure.
Jun
13
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
19
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
26
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
10
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
Except that damn is a verb, not an adjective. It is used interchangeably with damned simply because people do not enunciate the d at the end, which makes damned sound like damn. It is the same reason that the Internet generation keeps writing should of, would of, and could of. Yes, some dictionaries include damn as an adjective, but that’s all the more troubling. Just because lots of people do something wrong does not make it correct or acceptable.
Feb
21
comment Which one is it? “Damn” or “damned”?
@Dusty, oops, I misplaced the not. Just a second; I’ll fix it…
Feb
21
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
For the record, I have since capitalized it only when referring to the location.
Feb
21
comment Why does the 3rd-person of verbs that end in -y follow the rule for plural nouns instead of verbs?
@hit-and-run-downvoter, I don’t even care that you didn’t bother to explain why you down-voted because I haven’t even checked this question in a long time; so congratulations, you accomplished nothing whatsoever.
Nov
9
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
26
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
15
awarded  Notable Question