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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 23 votes cast
Jul
7
comment Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
No, aside from the similarities in spelling, there there is no connection between machination and Machiavelli. …other than the similarity in meaning?
Jul
2
comment Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
The question is based on facts: they mean practically the same thing, and they sound similar (most cognates sound similar for a reason). Besides, there is almost certainly a definitive answer, and therefore there must be a real question since there cannot be answers to questions that aren’t real. You even called it a question in your comment, so you certainly cannot claim it to not be real; at most you can say it is not good enough for you, not to your liking. That does not make it invalid or not interesting to others (it already has an up-vote), let alone myself.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jul
1
comment Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
@everybody else, I had not considered looking into the Machiavelli lineage and background. Very interesting information. Unfortunately it seems to be even less clear now and is turning into a bit of a chicken-and-egg scenario. I suppose it could be argued that machination derives from Latin for mechanical in that plots and plans are like clockwork, but I don’t see how the sneaky, conniving aspect would fit; that must come from the style of Machiavelli’s writings for which he is specifically renowned.
Jul
1
comment Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
@Kris, how exactly is this NARQ‽ Just because the answer is obvious to you doesn’t make it an invalid question (if that were a legitimate reason to close questions, then 99% of questions would be expunged from the network). And yes, it is most definitely coincidental that they both sound the same and mean essentially the same thing if they are not actually connected.
Jun
28
comment Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
(Yes there are big and little coincidences. ☺)
Jun
28
asked Is there any connection between “machination” and Machiavelli?
Jun
18
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
3
awarded  Famous Question
May
11
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
@supercat, yes, and many gardens on Earth are filled with earth every spring, but nobody borrows a cup of hell or drives a hell or has a hell-sandwich.
May
11
comment Should “Hell” be capitalized?
Take care because most people understand RPG as "Rocket-Propelled Grenade" @Genady, yes, but context + common-sense/Google = no confusion.
Apr
14
answered How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?
Feb
27
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
28
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
"Could care less" actually occurs more frequently. So does ermahgerd,OMGlol. g2gcyal8r these days, but that isn’t any more correct than saying something is the opposite of what you mean (without purposely and knowingly meaning to be ironic). No fluent speaker will have any trouble understanding what you mean. The Oxford English Dictionary lists both with the same meaning. Maybe in person because familiarity, tone, inflection, context, and body-language can help, but what about in plain text? What about in Twitter or Facebook? What about from someone you don’t know?
Jan
2
comment Which is correct: “could care less” or “couldn't care less”?
I've heard it said that "could care less" is meant to be ironic, but I think this is just justification for the bastardisation of an English phrase. Yes, thank you! I’ve also heard that it is meant to be sarcastic, but that is BS because you cannot use that sarcastically or ironically, it just doesn’t work like actual ironic statements, and certainly not when used with the tone that anyone who has ever said it has used. It is definitely just another example of illiterate people trying to obstinately defend their ignorance instead of acknowledging it and trying to learn something.
Dec
1
comment Use of 'as per' vs 'per'
english.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer
Dec
1
awarded  Informed
Nov
12
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling