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 Civic Duty
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Mar
2
comment Is there any word in English where “th” sounds like “t+h”?
@Janus I cannot hear a difference in my own pronunciation between “top” and “stop”. Is this something you only hear if you actually record and play back the word (after cutting off the starting “s”)?
Jan
18
comment Are there any “fake” French words used in English?
False friends aren’t necessarily directly etymologically related though, whereas OP, I think, is looking for such a relationship.
Jan
18
awarded  Civic Duty
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
27
awarded  Announcer
Mar
3
accepted What’s the plural of “Valentine’s”
Mar
3
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
@Edwin What’s that? It seems the term “mitigation marker” is next to unused (according to Google), and the few references I can find mostly refer to Japanese grammar. At any rate, your rewrite unfortunately doesn’t clear up my understanding of what’s meant.
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
@JohnLawler According to the definition I linked, it can mean either (before looking this up I’d have agreed with you.)
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
(Incidentally, as I understand it “well done” and “well-done” are completely synonymous, that is they could both refer to either the quality or the cooking time.)
Feb
25
asked Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Mar
24
comment Is there any word for a person who ruins magician's trick?
@J.R. I’m not sure the second is actually a valid insult, given the fact that Ron Weasley is, as a matter of fact, a real wizard, and his spell didn’t work (presumably) because Scabbers isn’t a rat, not because he lacks skills. ;-)
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@Jonathan It’s a common misconception to think of the big bang as acausal (aided no doubt by the incorrect analogy to a theological “first cause”).
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
@Olivier I actually think “curt” is the perfect antonym.
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
I’d argue that for the purpose of this question “terse” is almost a synonym to “concise”, neither means “too few words to express the content”.
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
@Jon Those words happen not to exist (at least not in common usage). But I don’t think there’s a fundamental linguistic reason that forbids their existence. – But I don’t see how that relates to “watery” at all since, unlike your example, “watery” describes a quale.