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location Cambridge, United Kingdom
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Mar 24 at 20:39

I’m a bioinformatics PhD student at EMBL-EBI and the University of Cambridge but I’m originally from Berlin.

I’m mainly working on genomics using next-generation sequencing data. My current thesis project is about the regulation of tRNA expression in mammals.

Here’s my …

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Mar
24
comment Is there any word for a person who ruins magician's trick?
@J.R. I’m not sure the second is actually a valid insult, given the fact that Ron Weasley is, as a matter of fact, a real wizard, and his spell didn’t work (presumably) because Scabbers isn’t a rat, not because he lacks skills. ;-)
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@Jonathan It’s a common misconception to think of the big bang as acausal (aided no doubt by the incorrect analogy to a theological “first cause”).
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
@Olivier I actually think “curt” is the perfect antonym.
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
I’d argue that for the purpose of this question “terse” is almost a synonym to “concise”, neither means “too few words to express the content”.
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
@Jon Those words happen not to exist (at least not in common usage). But I don’t think there’s a fundamental linguistic reason that forbids their existence. – But I don’t see how that relates to “watery” at all since, unlike your example, “watery” describes a quale.
Jan
23
comment From French “manœuvre” to English “manoeuvre”, does “œ” exist in English?
@Ben Not really: “ö” in German (/ø/) maps to the exactly same sound as “œ” in French (although in French it may also be open: /œ/, compare French “vœux” (closed) and “cœur” (open)) and corresponds closely to the “i” in “bird”. The other words are similarly pronounced in varying fashions – it’s just that the closed form (ø) doesn’t have a very good correspondence in most English accents so the words are distorted accordingly.
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
@StoneyB If that’s idiomatic, it should be an answer, no?
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
Funny, the Japanese saying exists, 1:1, in German as well: “Der Berg kreißte und gebar eine Maus”. It’s apparently derived from Latin (Horace: “Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus” – “the mountains are in labour, they will bear a ridiculous mouse”).
Jan
14
revised Usage of “to” in “I've got some slides to talk to”
added 24 characters in body
Jan
14
answered Usage of “to” in “I've got some slides to talk to”
Jan
12
comment From French “manœuvre” to English “manoeuvre”, does “œ” exist in English?
That doesn’t make it less weird in my perception. Proper names are one of the few (the only?) cases where something akin to a canonical spelling exists. For instance, no matter how many people will write about “Shrodinger’s cat”, that spelling is wrong. It surprises me that this isn’t the case here (but then the name is much older).
Jan
11
comment From French “manœuvre” to English “manoeuvre”, does “œ” exist in English?
How did “Mœbius” land on that list? That spelling is quite puzzling since the Möbius strip (that is probably referred to here) is named after German mathematician Möbius whose name’s spelling I’ve never seen written differently, and proper names usually have no legitimate alternative spellings (bar transliterations).
Jan
5
comment Is “a software” really never correct?
“A mistake is still a mistake even if many people make it.” – I’m really not that happy with it. I agree in general but language does change. And it doesn’t change when we decide it does but when enough people change usage. I’m not sure that it’s happening in this particular case but it’s interesting that the frequency of usage of “a software” is almost on par with “a piece of software”.
Jan
5
comment Is “a software” really never correct?
@Groky Your experience isn’t really that relevant. What’s relevant is that it is widely used, as easily demonstrated by looking on Google ngram.
Dec
27
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
@Edwin I agree it isn’t a perfect match. But a soup can be described both as salty or watery. In that regard (i.e. to describe that something tastes like X) watery is to water as salty is to salt.
Dec
26
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
@Edwin Your explanation is good and I’d subscribe to it 100% but your dictionary research was less complete: Google “define watery”, second meaning. ;-)
Dec
25
answered Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
Dec
25
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
The answers make me think that this question should maybe migrated to biology.SE. Lots of people appear to think that water must taste of nothing but that is simply wrong.