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Jun
27
awarded  Announcer
Mar
3
accepted What’s the plural of “Valentine’s”
Mar
3
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
@Edwin What’s that? It seems the term “mitigation marker” is next to unused (according to Google), and the few references I can find mostly refer to Japanese grammar. At any rate, your rewrite unfortunately doesn’t clear up my understanding of what’s meant.
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
@JohnLawler According to the definition I linked, it can mean either (before looking this up I’d have agreed with you.)
Feb
25
comment Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
(Incidentally, as I understand it “well done” and “well-done” are completely synonymous, that is they could both refer to either the quality or the cooking time.)
Feb
25
asked Is a comma required before an interjected “well”?
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Mar
24
comment Is there any word for a person who ruins magician's trick?
@J.R. I’m not sure the second is actually a valid insult, given the fact that Ron Weasley is, as a matter of fact, a real wizard, and his spell didn’t work (presumably) because Scabbers isn’t a rat, not because he lacks skills. ;-)
Oct
11
awarded  Yearling
Sep
14
comment What do you call an event that happens without a cause?
@Jonathan It’s a common misconception to think of the big bang as acausal (aided no doubt by the incorrect analogy to a theological “first cause”).
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
@Olivier I actually think “curt” is the perfect antonym.
Apr
18
comment Opposite of “verbose”
I’d argue that for the purpose of this question “terse” is almost a synonym to “concise”, neither means “too few words to express the content”.
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
comment Salt tastes salty then water tastes …?
@Jon Those words happen not to exist (at least not in common usage). But I don’t think there’s a fundamental linguistic reason that forbids their existence. – But I don’t see how that relates to “watery” at all since, unlike your example, “watery” describes a quale.
Jan
23
comment From French “manœuvre” to English “manoeuvre”, does “œ” exist in English?
@Ben Not really: “ö” in German (/ø/) maps to the exactly same sound as “œ” in French (although in French it may also be open: /œ/, compare French “vœux” (closed) and “cœur” (open)) and corresponds closely to the “i” in “bird”. The other words are similarly pronounced in varying fashions – it’s just that the closed form (ø) doesn’t have a very good correspondence in most English accents so the words are distorted accordingly.
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
@StoneyB If that’s idiomatic, it should be an answer, no?
Jan
23
comment Are there popular English sayings to express “Big fuss, tiny result”?
Funny, the Japanese saying exists, 1:1, in German as well: “Der Berg kreißte und gebar eine Maus”. It’s apparently derived from Latin (Horace: “Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus” – “the mountains are in labour, they will bear a ridiculous mouse”).
Jan
14
revised Usage of “to” in “I've got some slides to talk to”
added 24 characters in body