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I am a Systems Engineer with many years of experience in electronic systems, including communication systems, network systems, and radar systems, with a focus on signal processing and architecture. "Know your customer and his/her needs." My hobbies include photography, yachting, software development, writing, and foreign languages.

If you don't know what to do with your spare time, go walk your dog. If you don't have a dog, walk someone else's dog. It's a better way for you to spend your time than what you are doing right now. If you think you don't have any spare time, then you probably don't have a dog.


Jul
26
comment Better term for “intellectual jokes”
The thing with English that you have to understand is that there are many ways to conveythe same meaning. In this case "scholarly" is equivalent to "cerebral" or "intelligent", or even "thoghtful". "Highbrow" is a very common expression to mean what you are referring to.
Jul
25
comment Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter
@dberm22: Please don't mistake my butchery of the English language to be intentional or unintentional. -- This should cover all your bases This also gets rid of the and/or issue.
Jul
23
comment “Between” Two Locations
Do you think some Ferris Bueller-type might want to take a spin around town for awhile between A and B in your carriage?
Jul
18
comment Collective noun for lightning(s) / thunderbolts
I'd like to see an example in context of lightening being used as a singular or countable noun in a literary sense. I don't follow you on that. Also, lightnings (plural) is never users, as far as I know.
Jul
14
comment What's the word for a sportsperson who always makes his team win?
@Rupe I haven't seen that when referring to athletics. It is sometimes used in scholastics, though. The "anchorman" at the US Naval Academy is the one with the lowest scholatic rank in his class. At the US Military Academy, that person is called the "goat". Do you have a reference for your comment?
Jun
28
comment What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
I should have added that hyphenation is often used to convert a phrase into an adjective. For example "My dress is ready to wear" vs. "My dress is ready-to-wear" have different meanings.
Jun
28
comment What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
I would say off-key is an adjective, whereas off key is a prepositional phrase / adverb modifier. (Others might disagree.) For your use of off-key, you might substitute awkward or inelegant, which are both adjectives. Yes, off-key is a metaphor based on the musical source of the term.
Jun
27
comment What is the opposite of “down-home cooking”?
If you don't have an apple, you get a doctor.
Jun
22
comment How does one translate 'mast' into English
I haven't seen any source text here. Have you?
Jun
16
comment Does using “Their watch is ended” over “Their watch has ended” change the meaning of the sentence?
Without more context, making a distinction is meaningless.
Jun
10
comment What's the English name for this three-wheeled manual pedal vehicle in China?
What is"manual" about this?
May
25
comment Is there words that mean “meet the criteria”?
You really should give people time to answer before accepting the first response. Especially since you are encouraging questions to help you find a suitable answer.
May
25
comment Is there words that mean “meet the criteria”?
Do you have reason to thnk there is such a word in English? I'm curious if there is one in another language.
May
22
comment Word for foreigner or person of another race mistaking you for someone?
@ermanen You have to recognize from reading the references that race plays only a part of it, even though the terms are race-oriented. The effect is more about what are familiar physiognomic attributes and the tendency to focus on those when performing identification.
May
19
comment Is there any word available for an incident occurred and vanished in front of eyes?
This hint of a metaphor are very powerful, even for this literal application. You might strengthen your snswer with some synonyms.
May
6
comment Derogatory term for a rookie soldier
Grunt refers the infantry soldiers and marines. The infantry refers to those who are not infantry as POGs - people other than grunts. The word grunt has nothhing to do with a soldier's experience or competence. Only a REMF or a civilian would make this mistake.
Apr
22
comment What's it called when you lose contact with reality when watching a movie?
Suspension of disbelief is the act of overlooking obvious flaws in the realism of a story (i.e., whether the story is consistent with reality, not the same as whether you can't differentiate between the story and reality). It has nothing to do with being immersed in the story.
Apr
4
comment A word that means 'most important'?
You didn't think essential was a good choice, after you considered quintessential?
Apr
3
comment Less colloquial term for “zoom in”
Let us... is certainly colloquial in that it imparts an informal, familiar, and conversational tone to the statement. "Colloquial" does not necessarily mean "non-standard". If you want to write a report that does not sound "colloquial", then I recommend avoiding formulations like "Let us..." I see that the OP didn't say this was a written statement for a report, and if it's not, that could change things. But if I were giving a presentation verbally, I would not hesitate using colloquial language, even if I were presenting to high government officials.
Apr
1
comment Less colloquial term for “zoom in”
I would say that beginning with "Let us..." is also on the colloquial side.