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location California
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
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I am a Systems Engineer with many years of experience in electronic systems, including communication systems, network systems, and radar systems, with a focus on signal processing and architecture. "Know your customer and his/her needs." My hobbies include photography, yachting, software development, writing, and foreign languages.

If you don't know what to do with your spare time, go walk your dog. If you don't have a dog, walk someone else's dog. It's a better way for you to spend your time than what you are doing right now. If you think you don't have any spare time, then you probably don't have a dog.


11h
comment Better term for “intellectual jokes”
The thing with English that you have to understand is that there are many ways to conveythe same meaning. In this case "scholarly" is equivalent to "cerebral" or "intelligent", or even "thoghtful". "Highbrow" is a very common expression to mean what you are referring to.
23h
comment Noun to describe a “typo-filled” letter
@dberm22: Please don't mistake my butchery of the English language to be intentional or unintentional. -- This should cover all your bases This also gets rid of the and/or issue.
1d
answered A critical situation in which no trick works?
2d
awarded  Nice Question
2d
answered English idiom equivalent to “Like a deaf man at a wedding procession”
2d
comment “Between” Two Locations
Do you think some Ferris Bueller-type might want to take a spin around town for awhile between A and B in your carriage?
Jul
23
revised More emphatic term for “Expert”?
added 411 characters in body
Jul
22
answered More emphatic term for “Expert”?
Jul
18
comment Collective noun for lightning(s) / thunderbolts
I'd like to see an example in context of lightening being used as a singular or countable noun in a literary sense. I don't follow you on that. Also, lightnings (plural) is never users, as far as I know.
Jul
15
awarded  vocabulary
Jul
14
answered What is the difference between “deployment” and “release”?
Jul
14
comment What's the word for a sportsperson who always makes his team win?
@Rupe I haven't seen that when referring to athletics. It is sometimes used in scholastics, though. The "anchorman" at the US Naval Academy is the one with the lowest scholatic rank in his class. At the US Military Academy, that person is called the "goat". Do you have a reference for your comment?
Jul
14
answered What's the word for a sportsperson who always makes his team win?
Jun
28
revised What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
referenced wrong example in my last update.
Jun
28
comment What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
I should have added that hyphenation is often used to convert a phrase into an adjective. For example "My dress is ready to wear" vs. "My dress is ready-to-wear" have different meanings.
Jun
28
comment What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
I would say off-key is an adjective, whereas off key is a prepositional phrase / adverb modifier. (Others might disagree.) For your use of off-key, you might substitute awkward or inelegant, which are both adjectives. Yes, off-key is a metaphor based on the musical source of the term.
Jun
28
revised What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
added 246 characters in body
Jun
28
revised What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
word correction
Jun
28
revised What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?
added 598 characters in body
Jun
28
answered What's the noun for “off-key” or “out of tune”?