Reputation
16,048
Next privilege 20,000 Rep.
Access 'trusted user' tools
Badges
1 23 61
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~573k people reached

Jul
23
comment How can “ A smell leapt out so horrid that it seemed to colour the air ” be correct?
It looks like a poorly written mixed metaphor. Horror and color aren't generally used together, even in figurative expressions.
Jul
17
comment What images evoke the concept of “skin in the game”, commitment, investment, and accountability?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this site is concerned with the English language, not visual metaphors
Jul
17
comment Neutral word for half-hearted
You need to provide context and/or examples for this sort of request. Allow us to understand why "half-hearted" doesn't work for you.
Jul
15
comment Framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number
@Mari-LouA I have to disagree. The word "which" focuses on the question of ordinality better than "what" does. An answer to the question "what are you" might very reasonably be something like "(I'm not the first, but) I am the brightest!" I am an American speaker.
Jul
13
comment what does the preposition “up” mean in “He got beaten up by other kids in school”?
This is a very good and authoritative answer. It adds a dimension to the meaning that one might not otherwise be consciously aware of. Might I say "Work was punishing today" is atelic and "I was punished at work today" is telic? On the other hand, does "thoroughly" (as StoneyB mentions) imply telicity? To be beaten up today does not necessarily mean tomorrow will be any different. (And many of us in the corporate world are familiar with the phrase the beatings will continue until morale improves.)
Jul
10
comment Expression meaning crying in reaction to beauty
In a question worded in terms of cause and effect, the question was about effect. You worded the title to ask about cause.
Jul
9
comment Expression meaning crying in reaction to beauty
Edited to resolve conflict introduced in first edit.
Jul
9
comment Expression meaning crying in reaction to beauty
It is unclear whether you want to know an expression for the beauty that causes the crying or an expression that means "crying because of beauty" Your subject title does not match your question.
Jul
3
comment “This page intentionally blank” … but it isn't!
While your at it, tell me why stores open 24/7 have locks on the doors.
Jul
1
comment What do you call someone who is favored by a higher authority?
Apparently there is a trend among some that words should only have the meanings that they are familiar with and that any suggestion that language has more depth and dimension than they have experienced is irrelevant. It's okay to use words in the way they are defined in the dictionary. We have dictionaries and other references to hold the vast amount of information that won't readily fit inside small minds.
Jun
30
comment What is the short for “focusing on the key component of the problem?”
I think the OP would like root cause analysis better than root cause.
Jun
29
comment Is there a word for a fish's stationary position
Related question: Do Submarines Float?
Jun
29
comment What does “Sp 12” mean?
This is a good catch!
Jun
26
comment “Come out with your hands up… and something with coconut”
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's topic is better covered as writing advice.
Jun
25
comment A less hostile word that can replace “violation”
You need to get a dictionary and start looking words up. An exception is not necessarily accepted. The whole software world deals with exceptions handlers that do something about exceptions besides notice them.
Jun
25
comment A less hostile word that can replace “violation”
Your whole question is predicated on a faulty understanding of the word "violation". "Breaking the terms of a law" implies malintent as much as falling through a glass window (breaking the glass) implies malintent.
Jun
24
comment Another expression for “drinking behavior” or “drinking habits”?
Members' drinking habits generally follow the "monkey see, monkey do" principle.
Jun
23
comment Is there a single word which means “comatose with pleasure”?
Are you sure you mean "literally incapable of movement"?
Jun
22
comment Idiom/expression that means “canceling” an event from your calendar?
Yes, you can say that. Or "I axed my trip to London." "I scrubbed my plan to go to London." "My London trip has been called off." Or "With all this work we have, our weekend in London will have to be shitcanned."
Jun
22
comment Word for “scheduled activities”?
Generally, it wouldn't be said the way you propose in your example, even if a single word were found to fit. A more likely statement might be something like "I checked my schedule AND (not BUT) realized I had no plans. Also, a subtle problem with the form you offered is that you can't check something that doesn't exist. You can have a schedule or an agenda that is empty, but you can't have a something that doesn't exist (even if it's mental).