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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
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I am a Systems Engineer with many years of experience in electronic systems, including communication systems, network systems, and radar systems, with a focus on signal processing and architecture. "Know your customer and his/her needs." My hobbies include photography, yachting, software development, writing, and foreign languages.

If you don't know what to do with your spare time, go walk your dog. If you don't have a dog, walk someone else's dog. It's a better way for you to spend your time than what you are doing right now. If you think you don't have any spare time, then you probably don't have a dog.


Sep
6
comment Where did the phrase “drop the hammer” come from?
The nice thing about having ELU at your fingertips is that you also have the rest of the internet within your reach, also. Try doing some research with just the expression, and forget about rowing. You will generally get a lot more help here if you show some initial effort or some sort. Otherwise, you have a strong chance of having your question closed for being a general reference question where the answer can be easily obtained from readily available resources.
Sep
6
comment Where did the phrase “drop the hammer” come from?
I'd like to see what references you have used where these expressions are explained. Drop the hammer has other meanings than the one you referred to. There is quite a lot to be learned about what it means before you start asking where did it come from.
Sep
6
comment What do you call a woman who is crafty, employs ingenuity in a general range of things like sewing, baking, paper crafts, etc
I would say she is just being modest. (And if we're talking about your wife, I would steer clear of any Martha Stewart references.)
Sep
5
comment What do you call a woman who is crafty, employs ingenuity in a general range of things like sewing, baking, paper crafts, etc
If you throw in convicted felon, you have Martha Stewart.
Sep
5
comment that feeling where you feel like you need to do something but can't remember what it is
@Josh61 - the tags include "phrases". The term "doorway effect" is used to describe the condition (or the symptoms). My answer also provides authoritative background on the condition in support of my recommended answer.
Sep
5
comment What is the opposite of “Destination”
You should give time for answers to be given before accepting one. Your own reservations about the answer you accepted should tell you that it might not be the best. In this case, a later answer shows some excellent examples of how another word (origin) is commonly used to answer your request. You can undo your accept and reassign it.
Sep
4
comment What is a group of cars on the road called?
I would elaborate a little on my answer, if I were you. Add some examples and maybe some quotations and references to show it's usage. E.g., I try to get ahead to the traffic; I catch up to traffic.
Sep
4
comment Sieve vs filter? Are they opposites?
The definition of filter shows no preference for what is kept and what is discarded. The definition of sieve refers to a physical device that does filtering, and it also shows no preference to the question of what is kept and what is discarded. Filters and sieves separate things. Sieves separate physical things by dimension, notwithstanding Eratosthenes' metaphorical usage.
Sep
4
comment Etymology of “age of majority?”
Have you researched any of this? A good start is etymology.com. What did you learn? What question remains, exactly?
Sep
4
comment A word/phrase meaning the “house where I was born”?
I'm confused. You are looking for a word that means the house you were born in OR the first house you lived in (after being born somewhere) OR the very first house you grew up in OR a house you grew up in? Would this exclude the house if it wasn't your parents' house? (Maybe they died or went to prison!) Which is it?
Sep
3
comment What do you call a disgusting mixture you don't want to drink?
@sgroves Unexpected words like these can lighten the mood of the remark, which I think was one of the requirements in the original question. I think words like swill and slop are too simplistic to be funny. (I guess if you're really drunk when you say them or hear them, they sound funny, but then everything is either funny or an insult.) If the mixologist has to pause and say "Huh? WTF did you say?" then it cuts the edge off the insult for a moment.
Sep
3
comment Neutral alternative to “deny” to mean “assert the untruth [of a claim]”
@HotLicks The whole point of the non-denial denial is that it intentionally doesn't imply anything. The reader or listener can make any inference they want (as you did), and the one making this sort of denial can later claim you had it all wrong. And how can one infer that dismissing an accusation of something as serious as murder should mean the accused thinks it's a trivial accusation? (Oh, did you down vote my answer?)
Sep
3
comment Are there any better (perhaps business-oriented) alternatives to “pitting against” for this situation?
Using productivity, I'll make something up. A lot of people won't think it's a word, but it really is. Competitionize. Yeah, what they have there is a good old competitionization. That's too new to be obsolete, like Fumblefinger's obsolete competize, so I think it will do the trick.
Sep
3
comment What is the meaning of 'Oshkosh by Gosh'?
Most likely meaningless, even if the individual utterances map to words or expressions that you can find in a dictionary (even if it's the Urban Dictionary.) I can only imagine it comes from a regional accent pronunciation of Oshkosh by Gosh, as Jim mentioned. What TV show did this come from? What episode?
Sep
3
comment What do you call the side of a building that is neither the near side nor the far side?
How about "The sounds of the conversation led her around the near (or nearby) corner of the building, where fellow..."
Sep
3
comment Is there a business phrase for whack-a-mole?
If you consider that it has come into use in some of the most formal environments (see wikipedia link), "Whack-a-mole" might be the most acceptable, concise and recognizable way to describe this. I would have no reluctance to use the term in a formal document or in a briefing to a very senior government official (maybe with scare quotes), and I can attest to its use under such circumstances.
Sep
3
comment How to address multiple conflicting nouns?
As Daniel said, there is no conflict in your example. You may want to reword the example.
Sep
2
comment Word for a combination of video / visuals / perhaps other media
Is montage the word you're looking for?
Sep
2
comment On Track vs On Tracks
You should show your work and tell us why it doesn't help. Newcomers here are encouraged to do research, show the research, and then ask a question based on what they may have already learned and shared with the rest of us. Otherwise, you are going to get little help with your questions. Simple questions that can be answered by common reference sources will usually be closed. If you try this, it should begin to help.
Sep
2
comment Informal Vocabulary - 'Mank you'
Are you hearing this or was this in a subtitle? I am pretty sure some subtitles are computer generated and tend to be full of errors when the speaking isn't clear enough.