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comment “This page intentionally blank” … but it isn't!
While your at it, tell me why stores open 24/7 have locks on the doors.
Jul
1
comment What do you call someone who is favored by a higher authority?
Apparently there is a trend among some that words should only have the meanings that they are familiar with and that any suggestion that language has more depth and dimension than they have experienced is irrelevant. It's okay to use words in the way they are defined in the dictionary. We have dictionaries and other references to hold the vast amount of information that won't readily fit inside small minds.
Jun
30
comment What is the short for “focusing on the key component of the problem?”
I think the OP would like root cause analysis better than root cause.
Jun
29
comment Is there a word for a fish's stationary position
Related question: Do Submarines Float?
Jun
29
comment What does “Sp 12” mean?
This is a good catch!
Jun
27
comment SAT grammar question
What's your question? You could remove either "because" or "so" as their purpose is redundant in relating a premise to a conclusion.
Jun
26
comment “Come out with your hands up… and something with coconut”
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's topic is better covered as writing advice.
Jun
25
comment A less hostile word that can replace “violation”
You need to get a dictionary and start looking words up. An exception is not necessarily accepted. The whole software world deals with exceptions handlers that do something about exceptions besides notice them.
Jun
25
comment A less hostile word that can replace “violation”
Your whole question is predicated on a faulty understanding of the word "violation". "Breaking the terms of a law" implies malintent as much as falling through a glass window (breaking the glass) implies malintent.
Jun
24
comment Another expression for “drinking behavior” or “drinking habits”?
Members' drinking habits generally follow the "monkey see, monkey do" principle.
Jun
23
comment Is there a single word which means “comatose with pleasure”?
Are you sure you mean "literally incapable of movement"?
Jun
22
comment Idiom/expression that means “canceling” an event from your calendar?
Yes, you can say that. Or "I axed my trip to London." "I scrubbed my plan to go to London." "My London trip has been called off." Or "With all this work we have, our weekend in London will have to be shitcanned."
Jun
22
comment Word for “scheduled activities”?
Generally, it wouldn't be said the way you propose in your example, even if a single word were found to fit. A more likely statement might be something like "I checked my schedule AND (not BUT) realized I had no plans. Also, a subtle problem with the form you offered is that you can't check something that doesn't exist. You can have a schedule or an agenda that is empty, but you can't have a something that doesn't exist (even if it's mental).
Jun
20
comment “The app can be run using the following link” - how to phrase it naturally?
A more natural statement might be something like "Use (or Type) this link to run the app: http//...". But you might invert the phrase if you want it to be easily found (at the beginning of a paragraph, for instance) when someone is looking for the answer to "how do I run it?". Then "To run the app, use the following link: http://..."
Jun
8
comment The word for a person who orders something (Wrong: Orderer)
There are a lot of ways this might be answered, depending on your specific context. If your example is the context rather than just one case of many, you should say so. If it is one of many, you should provide other examples. I would suggest initiator without knowing anything else.
Jun
3
comment What's an accurate term for “technical terminology” in the sentence:
Have you tried a thesaurus? There are at least 40 words that are synonyms to "jargon". Some of them actually fit your need.
May
27
comment There was a rumor +… is/ was
It's not that simple. E.g., There was a rumor (this morning) that... perfectly describes a continuing condition.
May
23
comment What is a good antonym for “redundant” (engineering)?
As an engineer with may years of experience, I would vouch for this answer. But it would be better to include some examples in your answer. A simple Google search on phrases like "non-redundant design", "non-redundant electrical design", "non-redundant mechanical design", and "non-redundant systems", would provide many examples of its use. Comments don't provide enough room to link to them. (I understand this might be a circular argument, but, apart from my own experience, it does show that the term is widely used.)
May
23
comment What is a good antonym for “redundant” (engineering)?
So... what is the antonym of "redundant"? I don't think you provided that. You have only given an attribute that a non-redundant device might have. (And even some redundant devices still suffer from single points of failure.)
Apr
25
comment Does 'lure' have a negative connotation
I would quibble that the use of the word "absolutely" shouldn't be taken to indicate the strength or degree of negativity. Lure can have a sense that is anywhere from neutral to extremely negative.