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Apr
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
9
answered What does “flop out of the box” mean? Is it a popular turn of phrase?
Apr
8
revised Word meaning romantic but without conveying the idea of love?
added 1 character in body
Apr
8
answered Word meaning romantic but without conveying the idea of love?
Apr
6
answered Another word for key-points of a certain entity
Apr
4
answered A single word for “someone who readily takes responsibility/new tasks”
Apr
2
comment I need an adjective to precede the word “method”
You are going to have to address the context concerns expressed in the comments or this question will be closed soon. The best approach might be to write your phrase using words you don't like and ask for smeone to propose something better. I suppose better, to you, would be as a one word adjective.
Apr
1
comment Are there rules about where a long title should be broken across lines?
You should show some research into the matter. Knowing what the purpose of a title is might lead you to your answer. That might be a direction you can go with your research.
Mar
31
revised Can I say “listen for it” and “smell for it”?
added nose out
Mar
31
answered Can I say “listen for it” and “smell for it”?
Mar
30
comment Looking for a shorter term for “Preferred places to meet”
It seems like they don't even need to meet. They just need a preferred exchange location. (It even allows for someone else can handle the exchange.)
Mar
30
comment is “modus operandi” singular or plural?
@Cerberus :( Now I have lost all confidence in the internet. There is nothing left.
Mar
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
30
comment is “modus operandi” singular or plural?
@BlessedGeek I'm not sure why you would give a reference that contradicts rather than supports your claim. Perhaps you are withholding evidence?
Mar
30
awarded  Guru
Mar
29
comment What is the correct hyphenation of “human skin tissue emulating gel”?
See also 1, 2, and 3.
Mar
29
comment What is the correct hyphenation of “human skin tissue emulating gel”?
Style guides recommend limiting your use of hyphens to where they will improve understanding and remove ambiguity in meaning. (Otherwise, you should leave them out to avoid clutter.) At first glance it looks like only one interpretation would be clear, whereas the others would be absurd. I would go with no hyphens at all.
Mar
29
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
29
comment He rares himself up?
"Rare up and ready to go" is a phrase I have heard often enough growing up.
Mar
28
revised Is there an English idiom that means “you can always find a law to convict anyone”?
slight wording change