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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Nov 22 at 16:52

I am a Systems Engineer with many years of experience in electronic systems, including communication systems, network systems, and radar systems, with a focus on signal processing and architecture. "Know your customer and his/her needs." My hobbies include photography, yachting, software development, writing, and foreign languages.

If you don't know what to do with your spare time, go walk your dog. If you don't have a dog, walk someone else's dog. It's a better way for you to spend your time than what you are doing right now. If you think you don't have any spare time, then you probably don't have a dog.


Oct
27
comment two times three
The question is POB, not about English. Multiplying two times three is 3+3, then why do you say 2+2+2?
Oct
27
answered Do submarines float?
Oct
27
comment English words that are both nouns and “connectors”?
@PeterShor - We think alike. If I had not been interrupted by a long phone call while finishing my answer, I would feel compelled to share the credit by more than this comment. But it IS a devilishly interesting puzzle, once this has been determined.
Oct
27
comment English words that are both nouns and “connectors”?
I'd be interested in seeing the full puzzle (the other sentences you refer to, and the set up).
Oct
27
answered English words that are both nouns and “connectors”?
Oct
26
comment Someone who “eats like a …” is someone who eats a lot or has a huge appetite
@FumbleFingers - Yes. As usual, you have identified some distinctive details in clear words. Eating like a horse can be used approvingly (He's a growing boy...). Thanks.
Oct
26
comment Is there a pejorative/offensive slang word or phrase for a man who suffers from erectile dysfunction?
Are you interested in the subject of ED or EDS? The link in your last comment looks irrelevant to ED, but relevant to EDS. What do you mean "not looking for lists"? What is your native language and what are some or the corresponding pejorative terms that you refer to in that language? To keep answers focused, typically some context, like how these terms would be used, is helpful. As someone who has contributed here for several months, you should know that this information, if added, should go into an edit of the question, and not in the comments.
Oct
26
comment Someone who “eats like a …” is someone who eats a lot or has a huge appetite
@FumbleFingers Out here in cowboy country, our horses don't give much thought to our pocketbooks when it comes to eating. This led someone once to caution me about adopting a horse myself, for that very reason. Do horses eat with more concern to their diets and their keepers budgets elsewhere? (Eat's like a pig IS more common, but it's also a bit nastier expression.)
Oct
26
comment Someone who “eats like a …” is someone who eats a lot or has a huge appetite
It's not an idiom. It's a metaphor or, more precisely, it's a simile. But the original question is right if it referred to it as a saying/idiom.
Oct
26
comment Is “to boil down” formal enough to be used in scientific writing?
+1 for reduce as in and thus the above definition reduces to the following:
Oct
26
comment Is there a pejorative/offensive slang word or phrase for a man who suffers from erectile dysfunction?
I would reconsider my remarks if it weren't for the fact that the single link referred to as "research" pointed to a web page that makes no mention of the topic. It took twelve hours for a correction to be made, and even then it was done by a Andrew, a long time contributor to this site, and not by the author of the question. And given that the Author claims to be an MD, I would hope he might have taken the hint he so explicitly asked for and provided improved content. It's not as if he arrived here yesterday.
Oct
26
comment Is there a pejorative/offensive slang word or phrase for a man who suffers from erectile dysfunction?
The flaw in our question is that you have shown no amount of research to indicate that there is an ounce of seriousness to it. In case I have the wrong impression, you should at least recognize that the way you posed your question points to that conclusion.
Oct
25
revised What's a synonym for “not last”
added 161 characters in body
Oct
25
answered What's a synonym for “not last”
Oct
25
comment What's the English for the Italian 'materico'?
Yes, pretty much. The only thing missing was the concession that materico can be considered successfully adopted word that stands on its own in English usage among art historians. But I will up vote you!
Oct
25
comment What is the meaning of “metaphysics” in terms of study/science beyond the physical?
If Lyall Watson were Humptey Dumpty, he would say "it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less".
Oct
25
revised How do you refer to an item that you already mentioned in a previous example?
missing words added. Unclear sentence removed Spurious remark removed at end.
Oct
25
revised What's the English for the Italian 'materico'?
added 38 characters in body
Oct
25
answered What's the English for the Italian 'materico'?
Oct
25
answered A de facto assumption?