501 reputation
23
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Oct 18 '10 at 20:06

Oct
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
8
awarded  Yearling
Oct
18
answered Irregular plurality situations in English
Oct
18
comment What is the plural form of “Software”?
Agreed. Common error I have to correct in non-native writing (particularly from speakers of languages where "software" or a contraction "soft" is used as a countable loan word, including French, Dutch and German).
Oct
13
comment “viruses” or “virii”?
Fair comment. I think I first encountered it in a job lot with e.g. boxen and Elvii (cf the jargon file/hacker's dictionary), so the wilfully whimsical style of use was fairly clear from that - I shouldn't universalise my own experience.
Oct
12
answered Signalling or signaling?
Oct
12
comment Is “Me neither” incorrect?
"Me neither" and "neither do I" are "incorrect" in the terms of some doomed attempt to reduce language to symbolic logic; they are "correct" in that they are utterances that a very large majority of contemporary native English speakers, on both sides of any ocean you care to name, would find absolutely unremarkable. "Nor I" is markedly dated and formal in register. "Nor do I" is pretty neutral in British English at least, though.
Oct
11
answered How should blockquoted quotations be formatted?
Oct
11
answered 19th century English texts occasionally use Germanic-style number words, such as “four-and-twenty”. When did this fall out of use?
Oct
11
answered Is kickassiness an accepted word?
Oct
11
awarded  Supporter
Oct
9
comment Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to?
It has also struck me that the written form disguises two spoken forms: one contrastive, with emphasis on "next", the other unmarked and evenly stressed. I think that I'd almost always use the contrastive form for seven days from today, for example, or otherwise when there is perceived scope for confusion. When both the-next-Tuesday and the-Tuesday-after-that are referred to, "this Tuesday" and "next Tuesday" may be used together. And most of the comments relating to "next" can also be applied mutatis mutandis to "last".
Oct
9
answered Dropped g's in upper-class 1930s Britain
Oct
9
answered When to use “around” and “about”?
Oct
9
comment “At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?
I think that the general "at" for a point, "in" for a period or span is the way to go. In the eighties, at the end of the eighties, at the turn of the century, in the /fin de siècle/ era, ... (the last is a bit laboured, though)
Oct
9
awarded  Teacher
Oct
8
answered “At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?
Oct
8
answered “Good bye”, “Bye”, “Bye bye”
Oct
8
answered “viruses” or “virii”?