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  • 128 votes cast
Apr
10
comment Is “outside food” acceptable in formal English?
I like "Guests cannot bring their own food" or perhaps "Guests shall not bring their own food!"
Apr
10
comment Is “outside food” acceptable in formal English?
@tchrist: I meant parlance I'd use with business associates or on a printed sign, rather than on an SMS between close friends.
Apr
10
comment Is “outside food” acceptable in formal English?
@Mitch: The first definition of adjectives on oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/outside is the meaning I'm familiar with i.e. things pertaining to the outside e.g. outside lights. I suppose definition 2 (Not belonging to or coming from within a particular group, hence "outside contractors") is closest to that the meaning in question though "outside food" still sounds odd.
Apr
7
comment Should “The history of X” be followed by “began” or “begins”?
Google n-gram shows an equal mix in the 20th century: books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=history+of+*+begins%2Chistory+of+*+‌​began&year_start=1900 but a preference for "begins" in the 21st: books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=history+of+*+begins%2Chistory+of+*+‌​began&year_start=1900 , perhaps influenced by a small number of works which are often quoted.
Aug
16
comment Difference between “with”, “at” and “for” with a business title and a company name
Also "of" for unique (high-powered) business titles, such as "CEO of Motorola" ( bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23544430 ) and "chairman of The New York Times Company" ( nytimes.com/2013/08/08/business/media/… ).
Aug
16
comment How to use “to offer” with two objects?
@ Edwin Ashworth: It's common to anthropomorphise programs (processes) in computing.
May
20
comment “best thing since X”
My bad: I meant X doesn't surpass Y.
May
17
comment “best thing since X”
In that case, it implies that Y doesn't surpass X.
May
17
comment “best thing since X”
(otherwise, in the example, that thing isn't that great after all!)
Apr
3
comment “In a restaurant” or “at a restaurant”
why the downvote?
Apr
2
comment th followed by an s sound
Just as in "Henry the Sixth's throne" :-)
Apr
2
comment Which is correct: “Filename”, “File Name” or “FileName”?
Or "File-name"?
Jan
21
comment Quoting prices informally
@MετάEd: I agree with Timwi that this question can stand sufficiently well without extra context, but if you or anyone else wish to know, I was unsure because I was taught that two pounds forty (pence) is correct though it's common to hear six foot two, instead of six feet two when asked for one's height.
Jan
21
comment Quoting prices informally
Many thanks! +1 for very informative information on other currencies — wish I could give you more points!
Jan
21
comment Quoting prices informally
Thanks, I've heard two pounds and forty pence but not two pounds and forty pence. I wonder how that and two pound forty pence came about.
Jan
3
comment You are standing into danger
Also see oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/stand : [no object, with adverbial of direction] (of a ship) remain on a specified course: the ship was standing north
Dec
26
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
And 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong too.
Dec
22
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
"Three men make a tiger" is the closest to what I had in mind, but sadly it's not in English.
Dec
22
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
@Boofus: This assumes a third party intentionally creates and spreads the misinformation.
Dec
22
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
But it's not that they wish it to be true. Rather, they assume it to be true because others talk about it.