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  • 128 votes cast
Dec
22
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
"Bandwagon fallacy" sounds good, thanks!
Dec
22
comment Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
@FumbleFingers: That sounds plausible, but I didn't claim that lots of people believe it, just that some people believe it because others talk about it.
Dec
21
asked Term for the sense that something must be true because many people talk about it
Dec
19
awarded  Yearling
Dec
8
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
28
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
5
accepted OK to use two “there”s in a sentence?
Sep
29
comment Preposition: “[In] Which city are you located [in]?”
You're right; my mistake! I've edited my answer.
Sep
29
revised Preposition: “[In] Which city are you located [in]?”
Fix uncertain wrong example
Sep
29
comment OK to use two “there”s in a sentence?
Thanks! I didn't know about avoiding the same word in different senses. Isn't that the whole idea of syllepsis to implicitly (without actually repeating it) use the same word in different senses?
Sep
28
asked OK to use two “there”s in a sentence?
Sep
27
comment “Go by foot” vs. “go on foot”
Upvote as question seems reasonable.
Sep
27
answered Preposition: “[In] Which city are you located [in]?”
Sep
27
comment Is the second “are” required in “Here are the ideas I thought are worth spreading”?
Upvote because it's a good answer. Why was it even downvoted?
Sep
27
comment Is the second “are” required in “Here are the ideas I thought are worth spreading”?
Upvote because it's a reasonable question.
Sep
27
accepted Up my street and down the lane
Sep
24
comment Up my street and down the lane
Thanks for the interesting angle on metaphorical use, though I originally asked about the geographical one.
Sep
24
asked Up my street and down the lane
Jul
24
asked Use of possessive or object pronoun
Jul
24
accepted “Above”/“below” before/after a noun