1,544 reputation
516
bio website d7.pipemaze.com
location Vancouver, Canada
age 34
visits member for 4 years
seen yesterday

Canadian, native English speaker, background in academic linguistics, lifelong reader, and language enthusiast.

In the prescriptive versus descriptive grammar debate, I'm mostly descriptivist but with an appreciation for the prescriptivist idea that something being "popular" usage doesn't mean it's correct.


1d
comment Word meaning “to walk clumsily among many obstacles”?
Occam's Razor says they're just being poetic. If that is an important point that your answer relies on though, you might consider asking the asker to clarify the ambiguity.
Oct
17
comment Word meaning “to walk clumsily among many obstacles”?
@tommj Deoxygenated blood… Well that took an odd turn. But a point of physics: if deoxygenated blood is denser, that would make it have less volume for the same mass; i.e., less bulky.
Oct
17
comment Word meaning “to walk clumsily among many obstacles”?
@tommj The answer quotes a thesaurus with an incomplete definition; it's clearer if you check that thesaurus' associated dictionary entry: "lumber²: to move clumsily or heavily, especially from great or ponderous bulk" (emphasis mine). I suppose external obstacles could count, if they were carried and bulky, yes, but not external impeding terrain.
Oct
17
comment Word meaning “to walk clumsily among many obstacles”?
Lumbering means moving in a way caused by one's mass or a problem with one's gait. It's a word for when internal obstacles cause clumsy walking. It's not fitting when the obstacles are external.
Oct
15
revised What is the word for the emotion I feel when I see someone being humiliated?
rearrange clauses to fix the confusion evident in the comment
Oct
15
comment Etymology of a “pegged CPU”
It's the current top answer.
Oct
15
comment Etymology of a “pegged CPU”
@SteveBennett Many of us were there when this etymology was current and not mysterious.
Oct
15
comment Etymology of a “pegged CPU”
Though these things are true, they are not the path which our language took to give "pegged" this meaning in electronics.
Oct
15
suggested suggested edit on What is the word for the emotion I feel when I see someone being humiliated?
Oct
8
comment When is my son's first birthday?
@DavidMulder The problem with those two examples are that they are muddled with UI/UX considerations. To whit: you are not just presented with "Birthday:" and a blank, you are presented with three fields, for day, month, and year, making the implied request for DOB clearer; and yet, year is optional. They don't expect to get DOB there, they expect to get either birthday or DOB, and they'll accept either. They are overloading the meaning of the form for UX reasons, adding a confounding variable that make them much less useful as examples about a purely linguistic point.
Oct
7
awarded  Yearling
Oct
7
comment Why is there an “a” in “beggar”? Why not an “e”?
@PoisonDart To the contrary, English did evolve. That "committees" have tried to influence its evolution at times doesn't eliminate the fact that language naturally changes over time...
Sep
25
comment Preparing for metric dominance: alternatives to idioms using imperial units
@Yamikuronue To the contrary, the US of America used to be British and used British currency such as the pound at one time.
Sep
10
revised Why do sentences that start with “guess” end with a question mark?
added 254 characters in body
Sep
10
answered Why do sentences that start with “guess” end with a question mark?
Sep
10
comment Why do sentences that start with “guess” end with a question mark?
@MickaelCaruso But that you personally avoid that kind of construction isn't really relevant when you ask why others use it, is it? (I almost elided "is it" before the question mark, but that felt too cheeky.)
Sep
4
revised Two crows being an attempted murder
fix formatting; add [jokes] tag
Sep
4
suggested suggested edit on Two crows being an attempted murder
Sep
4
comment Sieve vs filter? Are they opposites?
The question appears to be unconsciously referencing various mathematical sieves, such as the sieve of Eratosthenes, and then "verbing" them. Possibly "sieve" has become a verb in the domain of math.
Sep
2
comment What is the origin of the term “ginger” for red-headed people?
@EdwinAshworth See, that is how you construct a reasonable argument, not going on about modern dyes. It almost convinces me, except for ginger also meaning red plumage.