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 Civic Duty
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Aug
8
comment Is there a term for joyriding without stealing a car or endangering myself?
You may want to qualify your first sentence's first clause with "in the UK", since the distinction relies on an oddity of UK law. This would not be a meaningful distinction in, say, Canada, especially not regarding which word to use to describe the driving.
Jul
1
comment Word/phrase that means a series of problems of increasing severity caused by a small error
A situation “snowballing out of control” is a derived phrase that fits well, and may be worth mentioning in the answer.
Jun
30
comment An old car in bad condition
Your examples are adjectives; lots of answers have suggested nouns. Could you clarify if nouns are also acceptable, or do you require an adjective? Additionally, is slang appropriate for your intended use, or should slang be avoided?
Jun
27
comment When should I use “a” vs “an”?
@Charlie It's a phonological process that just happens to have gotten encoded in the orthography.
May
28
awarded  Civic Duty
Apr
23
comment Word for 'possessing large gravity well'?
@Cerberus Certainly! While one is driving in an autokinetic and feeling claustrotimorous about encroaching hybrid Latin-Greek words, we should certainly condemn the hyperenergotic imaginations that create such abominations! (Or we can just accept that they're actually pretty normal parts of English... Though, I do like the sound of supergravitational quite a lot.)
Apr
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
18
revised What is a good word for all sentient races?
change to suit site formatting conventions
Apr
18
answered What is a good word for all sentient races?
Feb
25
comment Is there a parallel to defenestration — for buses?
The trouble is, "voiture omnibus" hasn't been used to mean English bus since the 19th century, and then only for a brief period of time measured in months. It's an interesting etymological footnote, but voiture is the wrong half of the etymological origin of bus — our word came from latin omnibus, as illogical as that is at the semantic level.
Feb
25
comment Is there a parallel to defenestration — for buses?
It's a stretch, since voiture excludes buses. This is unlike fenestre, which does not include some windows but not others. Since this is specifically for buses, a morpheme that excludes buses isn't ideal. I do like the approach though. Speaking French myself though, subvoiturate looks silly (in the wrong way).
Feb
25
comment Is there a parallel to defenestration — for buses?
Problem: in current day-to-day French voiture just means "car" (in the broad "multi-person private vehicle" sense of car in English), making those in the know read subvoiturate as meaning "throw under the... car?" This is unlike defenestrate, which those in the know can read and understand directly. I like this approach, but "voiture" just doesn't carry the weight being asked of it here.
Feb
25
comment Is there a parallel to defenestration — for buses?
Latin plaustrum ("wagon") might suit better than the word for chariot.
Feb
20
comment Are there many -tion words that sound like 'vision'?
It's a sonorisation process, changing it from [ʃ] to [ʒ], but I can't really see what is conditioning the change...
Dec
25
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
1
comment Is there a derogatory word for “mobile phone” (cellphone) similar to “idiot box” for a television?
Any evidence of currency?
Nov
19
comment How can I describe a low temperature that doesn't actually feel cold?
The OP is specifically asking for something that has currency and isn't resting on poetic license.
Nov
19
comment How can I describe a low temperature that doesn't actually feel cold?
@AE It means the same 'round here, but both meanings have currency here.
Nov
19
revised Is “Me neither” incorrect?
update formatting convention
Nov
19
suggested approved edit on Is “Me neither” incorrect?