2,735 reputation
1226
bio website magnificentnose.com
location Highland Park, NJ
age
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Apr 13 at 1:45

I'm a freelance editor and avid reader. I love the English language despite it's maddeningly illogical grammar and syntax.


Jul
25
comment Commas after Conjunctions
Good answer, but I have a quibble: Your final example with em dashes isn't any more grammatical than the equivalent answer with commas. All it does is change the feel of the sentence; an em dash has a more urgent, choppy feel than a comma when used in dialog. Which ungrammatical sentence one uses depends on the feel one is looking to convey.
Jul
20
answered Breaking down “Of his honour and his glory, the people would sing” into subject, verb, predicate
Jul
12
comment What is the commonly accepted pronunciation of FAQ?
@RegDwight - They pronounce it "Dark Star".
Jul
9
comment Ambiguity of “Dogs must be carried on this escalator”
I disagree with you, I think the sign should be reworded. But your answer is hilarious! :)
Jul
9
comment Is there an English phrase for an inability to actually *leave* already?
Yeah, this is probably common to many nationalities and creeds. For another example, I commonly hear this referred to as a "Jewish goodbye".
Jul
7
comment “What it is that is” versus “what is”
Or it could be someone trying to sound more important by using moar words.
Jul
6
comment Differences between “Can you play the guitar?” and “Can you play guitar?”
Not in my experience. Do you have examples?
Jul
6
comment What is an expression for something you particularly like?
How about "Bring on the Swedish girls!" (To make it less gauche, add "if you would" to the end.)
Jul
6
suggested suggested edit on “What it is that is” versus “what is”
Jul
6
answered “What it is that is” versus “what is”
Jul
6
answered How to describe something that is very likely happening immediately?
Jul
3
comment Why names such as Hastings-on-Hudson?
Huh, didn't see that when I read the answer before, I obviously missed it. I wonder if towns choose these names in an attempt to push up property values? (Nice answer, by the way.)
Jul
3
revised What is the reason or proper usage of “price” and “pricing”?
added 272 characters in body
Jul
3
comment Why names such as Hastings-on-Hudson?
Another reason for these names is the prestige of the name "Hudson". Having a view of the Hudson River, at least in New York City, means the property is expensive. It's not hard to make the jump to this logic being applied to Croton on Hudson, Hastings on Hudson, et cetera--all towns north of the city on the river.
Jul
3
revised What is the reason or proper usage of “price” and “pricing”?
added 445 characters in body
Jul
3
answered What is the reason or proper usage of “price” and “pricing”?
Jun
27
answered '2-3' or 'two to three' proper use
Jun
20
revised “Affordable price” vs. “affordable prices”
Typo fixed
Jun
20
suggested suggested edit on “Affordable price” vs. “affordable prices”
Jun
10
comment What is the origin of the term “Couch Potato”?
The downvotes aren't mine. This may not be am exhaustive, extensive answer, but neither is it wrong. (I posted a link to a book I thought was earlier, but accidentally deleted the comment, making this look all weird. Sorry about that!)