2,899 reputation
1429
bio website magnificentnose.com
location Highland Park, NJ
age
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a freelance editor and avid reader. I love the English language despite it's maddeningly illogical grammar and syntax.


Aug
26
comment What do you call a person who is always online on the Internet?
A high-rep Stack Exchange user.
Aug
16
comment What is the plural form of “iPad 2”?
I had two ipad two esses. Yeesss, the preciousss ipad two esssessss they is.
Aug
16
comment What is the origin of “stack” meaning $1000?
In other news, StackExchange is renamed GrandExchange.
Aug
13
awarded  Yearling
Aug
11
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
8
suggested suggested edit on What is the meaning of the phrase 'Here be dragons'?
Aug
8
comment What is the meaning of the phrase 'Here be dragons'?
Your answer is still untrue, as it claims the phrase was used frequently on maps. I submitted an edit, perhaps this will help?
Aug
8
comment What is the meaning of the phrase 'Here be dragons'?
You could simply add to your answer that this legend is not factual, but since people believe it to be true, the phrase has the same effect.
Jul
27
comment Is 'verbiage' still considered to be insulting?
Too many notes!
Jul
27
comment Is 'verbiage' still considered to be insulting?
I would take it as offensive as well -- but when I was young, I had the same misconception as the OP. So this isn't an isolated thing.
Jul
27
comment Are greetings and salutations redundant in an e-mail?
This is the best answer here, I think.
Jul
27
comment Are greetings and salutations redundant in an e-mail?
Emails that don't include at least a salutation (unless it's an ongoing thread) come across to me as curt and rude, and unless I know the person, significantly affect how I respond to the email.
Jul
25
comment What do you call someone who makes a request?
@Alan - In a business environment, "requestor" is quite common. However, I can't find this form of the word (or "requester") in any dictionary other than the free dictionary. Anyone else have any luck?
Jul
25
comment Commas after Conjunctions
Good answer, but I have a quibble: Your final example with em dashes isn't any more grammatical than the equivalent answer with commas. All it does is change the feel of the sentence; an em dash has a more urgent, choppy feel than a comma when used in dialog. Which ungrammatical sentence one uses depends on the feel one is looking to convey.
Jul
20
answered Breaking down “Of his honour and his glory, the people would sing” into subject, verb, predicate
Jul
12
comment What is the commonly accepted pronunciation of FAQ?
@RegDwight - They pronounce it "Dark Star".
Jul
9
comment Ambiguity of “Dogs must be carried on this escalator”
I disagree with you, I think the sign should be reworded. But your answer is hilarious! :)
Jul
9
comment Is there an English phrase for an inability to actually *leave* already?
Yeah, this is probably common to many nationalities and creeds. For another example, I commonly hear this referred to as a "Jewish goodbye".
Jul
7
comment “What it is that is” versus “what is”
Or it could be someone trying to sound more important by using moar words.
Jul
6
comment Differences between “Can you play the guitar?” and “Can you play guitar?”
Not in my experience. Do you have examples?