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Mar
21
comment A shorter phrase for “is a poor predictor of”
In that case, it will probably be easier for your audience to parse the standard phrase they're already familiar with, than any substitute you find (even if the replacement is shorter or otherwise better).
Mar
21
comment A shorter phrase for “is a poor predictor of”
is a poor predictor of is a standard phrase in the jargon of science writing. Are you addressing a lay or professional audience?
Dec
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
25
answered What is the meaning of “public sphere” and “public space”?
Aug
23
comment Noun form of primary
The noun is primacy, like I said. It's defined, in each of those three links, as a noun. Is there something I missed?
Aug
22
awarded  Editor
Aug
22
revised To download something ON or ONTO a device?
added 256 characters in body
Aug
22
answered To download something ON or ONTO a device?
Aug
22
answered Noun form of primary
Aug
9
answered “the average person” vs “an average person”
Jul
23
comment Why use “of” in the phrase “delivered of a baby”?
I think you'd have to be exceptionally flexible to deliver your own baby - it's usually done by a midwife or someone, no? I'm sure even a royal would be described as delivering a baby if they'd fielded someone else's progeny.
Jul
17
comment How to rephrase “cream flavoured cream”?
It feels like "creme" is used more as a contraction of crème pâtissière than a straight synonym for cream
Apr
3
answered What is the difference between “Gay” and “Homosexual"? Is it only by gender?
Mar
28
answered “Collar” meaning “grab or seize by the collar or neck”
Mar
28
comment “Collar” meaning “grab or seize by the collar or neck”
You don't have to physically grab someone's collar to metaphorically collar them, and OP's usages are valid in idiomatic British English.
Dec
15
awarded  Yearling
Dec
12
answered Is “subordinated” a good translation of the Italian legal term “subordinato”?
Dec
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
10
comment What does “premium” mean in “ten reasons to go premium”?
The original meaning IIUC relates to an "extra" payment or additional cost. Via the implication that something costs more because it is better, it has also come to be used as a description for the best model/version/whatever of something that comes in multiple versions (for comparison, the cheapest might be described as "basic" or "economy"). This use seems to be more prevalent in US English.
Dec
10
answered Difference in usage of “rock” and “rocks”