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Aug
21
comment What is the origin of “putting yourself in someone else’s shoes”?
And yes, it would be amazing if you could get some scientific insight by asking rambling questions on wholly unsuitable sites :)
Aug
21
comment What is the origin of “putting yourself in someone else’s shoes”?
I'm not sure philosophical arguments about the impossibility of free will in a deterministic neurochemical system are strictly on topic here. You might be better off directing those questions to a dedicated stack exchange site, if there is one, or to a suitable subreddit, or to a semi-comatose stranger at the end of a party, as is traditional.
Aug
21
comment Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts
@CreationEdge - true, but that was as much a comment on society as on Frankenstein's Monster.
Aug
21
answered Precise interpretation of “in excess of”
Aug
21
comment Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?
It seems like the construction is everywhere acceptable (and understandable) but un-idiomatic, the exception being for unambiguously singular roles as you suggest in your own comment, where it is still optional.
Aug
21
comment Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?
The History of Worcester quote looks very much like it has been abbreviated from normal usage because it is part of a long, repetitive textual list.
Aug
21
answered Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts
Aug
21
comment Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts
But Dr. Frankenstein was a very capable scientist and certainly not himself constructed from dead parts. </pedantry>.
Jul
9
comment Does the word “house” include the land that surrounds it?
Country estate (or, as above, the estate attached to the house) is fine.
Jul
9
answered Does the word “house” include the land that surrounds it?
Jun
4
comment “I make a hundred k a year”
Actually "kilo" is the SI prefix for one thousand of any unit. It's just that "Kilogram" ("Kg") is often informally abbreviated to "kilo".
May
22
comment Interesting: What's wrong with this sentence
What does which refer to in the original? Which what? The phrase "which time" fits and makes sense, although you could equally just have written "when" instead ... but in the original the which is dangling.
Apr
24
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Apr
24
answered Is there a better term than “technology”?
Apr
24
comment Is there a better term than “technology”?
The OP asked for a synonym that was more correct. There isn't one, and anyway the internet is no more an artifact than language is. It's a huge collection of scientific, technical, mathematical and engineering knowledge most correctly referred to in English as a technology.
Apr
24
comment Is “the” needed with the word “code” used in a general programming sense?
Those examples aren't mass or uncountable nouns. For example you could use "The wolf" or "A wolf" almost interchangeably in the first example, but you'd never refer to "a code" unless you were discussing cryptographic or information coding schemes. If you want to focus on the details of combining the definite article with countable and uncountable nouns, I think that might be a new question :)
Apr
24
revised Better term than “hardcoded” for end-user documentation
added 325 characters in body
Apr
24
answered Better term than “hardcoded” for end-user documentation
Apr
24
comment Better term than “hardcoded” for end-user documentation
Does a project have state in itself, or is it just a label? That is, would you expect one to be editable, or perhaps just creatable/deletable?
Apr
24
comment Duvet or “Cover bed” …?
Eiderdown is the only other synonym I can think of (specifically for a duvet stuffed with eider duck feathers, but used more generally).