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Apr
21
comment What's the archaic term for the place where swords were made?
That's just the generic suffix "ery" applied to the compound "swordsmith". It doesn't mean that "smithery" is used in isolation.
Mar
4
comment while as a time linker or as a contrast linker?
I think you're missing something: everything after the colon is explaining why REM sleep is "bizarre". That is, the contrast between the activity levels of the brain and muscles (which implicitly are usually correlated) is what makes REM sleep "bizarre".
Mar
4
answered What exactly does “The numbers are in” mean?
Mar
4
comment Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
The technical inaccuracy is significant in a technical discussion (so the speaker is making an actual error), but insignificant if you're just comparing vroom-vroom noises outside a bar with your friends. They're different contexts, with different requirements for accuracy and styles of speech, and I'm still not sure which one you're asking about.
Mar
3
comment Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
@Terah tin can is not a misnomer for a can made of tin. It isn't a misnomer for a can plated in tin. It isn't obviously inappropriate for a can-which-would-formerly-have-been-plated-in-tin-but-now-uses-plastic, except in the context of a detailed discussion on food storage technology, where the exact coating matters more than the general function.
Mar
3
comment Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
Is the technical inaccuracy significant in the context of use? If you're racing with, or working on the engine, it is. If you're comparing cars on coarse grounds of power, efficiency or "sportiness", it isn't...
Mar
3
comment Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
The Kleenex example is also synechdoche, so we're back to whether it's used in error or as a rhetorical device. Unless the context requires a very accurate discrimination between the properties of different brands of tissue, I think it's unlikely to be the former. For the original question, it depends on whether the technical inaccuracy is a problem or not.
Mar
3
comment Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
A misnomer is using the wrong name for something, presumably by mistake. Synechdoche is deliberately used. Although OP says the substitution is technically inaccurate, I'm not at all clear that it is an error of language.
Mar
3
revised Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
added 104 characters in body
Mar
3
answered Is there a term for when one word is used as a generic blanket term, even though it may be technically inaccurate?
Dec
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
28
comment Term for a roof pitch viewed from inside (Image included)
This doesn't usefully distinguish the restricted height above the desk from the full-height part of the room, as far as I can see.
Oct
28
comment Term for a roof pitch viewed from inside (Image included)
Everything in that room is beneath the rafters regardless of ceiling height.
Aug
21
comment What is the origin of “putting yourself in someone else’s shoes”?
And yes, it would be amazing if you could get some scientific insight by asking rambling questions on wholly unsuitable sites :)
Aug
21
comment What is the origin of “putting yourself in someone else’s shoes”?
I'm not sure philosophical arguments about the impossibility of free will in a deterministic neurochemical system are strictly on topic here. You might be better off directing those questions to a dedicated stack exchange site, if there is one, or to a suitable subreddit, or to a semi-comatose stranger at the end of a party, as is traditional.
Aug
21
comment Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts
@CreationEdge - true, but that was as much a comment on society as on Frankenstein's Monster.
Aug
21
answered Precise interpretation of “in excess of”
Aug
21
comment Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?
It seems like the construction is everywhere acceptable (and understandable) but un-idiomatic, the exception being for unambiguously singular roles as you suggest in your own comment, where it is still optional.
Aug
21
comment Can predicative complements not be bare noun phrases in English? That is, are clauses such as “I am student” incorrect?
The History of Worcester quote looks very much like it has been abbreviated from normal usage because it is part of a long, repetitive textual list.
Aug
21
answered Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts