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Dec
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comment Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?
@tchrist: ah of course. Yet these clearly appear to me to be in different syllables. That makes sense!
Dec
25
comment Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?
@HotLicks: Ah yes, triphthong =P. I don't expect it would change the meaning of the word or constitute a different dialect, I was just curious whether the way she emphasized this word constituted a triphthong. Wouldn't an affected/emphasized vowel sound which involves a quick but smooth movement of the articulator from one vowel quality to another that passes over a third constitute a triphthong?
Dec
25
revised Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?
added 2 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Dec
25
asked Is Lana's “Yup!” a triphthong?
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Jul
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accepted In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?
Jul
26
comment In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?
Yep this appears to be the answer. Apparently the term is "noun adjunct", see here: en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noun_adjunct . My confusion was that I thought that anything that modified a noun was an adjective, but this is not the case!
Jul
25
asked In place names, do the words qualifying the place act as an adjective?
Jul
15
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Jul
14
comment Is there a way to noun a prepositional verb phrase?
That being said the answer may be that the "ing" examples on the left already are noun phrases: "'Taking care of things' is something I'm good at" - it functions as a noun in that sentence, right?
Jul
14
comment Is there a way to noun a prepositional verb phrase?
@EdwinAshworth: Quirkiness is indeed part of the goal, but also aesthetic appeal. This is playing with the language: given the way it is set up, how can I (ab)use its grammatical rules to convey something in a (hopefully) delightful way. And to be delightful it has to conform to the "rules" where necessary. I am not sure how best to describe it but something clicks when I read "home-run-hitting" and my brain says: "this makes sense". Not so with "of-things-taking-care". Yet even that is better than some others: "caring-of-take-things" would be even more nonsensical.