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Jan
4
revised “Hover a link” vs “hover over a link”
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Jan
4
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Nov
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Jul
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Sep
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Mar
6
accepted Word for “device that provides constant doses of a liquid/dust/substance”
Mar
6
accepted “__ like so much fine china” phrase
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Feb
13
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Nov
7
comment How did the “double consonant to shorten vowel” thing come about? (“furry” vs. “fury”)
Thanks. The Middle English "furre" was pronounced [f'urÉ™], right? So back then it had the same vowel as "furie". And the vowel divergence occured some time after that. What's interesting is, why did this divergence follow a regular pattern in so many words. E.g "stakes/stacks". It's everywhere in English.
Nov
7
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Nov
7
revised How did the “double consonant to shorten vowel” thing come about? (“furry” vs. “fury”)
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Oct
26
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
26
comment Through a Glass, Clearly / A Scanner Darkly / In a Mirror, Darkly / etc
@Claudiu: I'd say it's just a case of the general biblic way of phrasing things strangely. Just look at en.wikisource.org/wiki/Bible_(King_James)/… - the "through a glass, darkly" doesn't stand out as being more uncommon than the rest of the text. I guess it's the combination of being 400yr old and being intentionally poetic.