285 reputation
18
bio website
location Rochester, NY
age 46
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jul 28 at 16:23

I am a mathematics teacher, husband, father, and one who really enjoys etymology. In college I took a class on the History of the English Language for fun (I didn't have the pre-requisites, so it was very hard) and I helped my mother with her linguistics homework. I'm co-authoring a college-level calculus textbook, and have co-authored a science fiction novel (looking for a publisher!) and am half-way through the sequel (on hiatus while we finish the textbook).

I hope none of this comes across as bragging (if it does, someone say something please!). I simply wanted to share my background and my reasons for wanting to participate on this site.


Apr
25
awarded  Popular Question
May
21
comment Name for relation between a man’s two wives?
@aibk01 Historically, some mormons practiced plural marriage (more than one wife) but that was discontinued officially before 1900. I have read the term 'sister wives' in writings from that time period.
May
21
awarded  Commentator
May
21
comment Are there rules about using “that” to join two clauses?
@BrettReynolds But some of us didn't realize is was specifically a "noun clause" and found Arne's answer to be helpful with the more generic question, "When 'that' joins two clauses (regardless of type), under what conditions can (or should) be omitted?"
May
21
comment Would it be correct to say that negative five is less than positive two?
@Andrew Negative numbers are not necessarily abstract. They are used in quantifying things where 0 does not mean "the absence of." For example, consider temperature as measured with Celsius or Fahrenheit scales. 0 degrees doesn't mean an absence of heat. It is a particular reference point on the scale. Negative values indicate values below the reference point.
May
21
comment Would it be correct to say that negative five is less than positive two?
Sorry, I thought your answer implied, "the question isn't an appropriate question for this site." That's what I disagreed with as the question concerned the correct use of English in this context.
May
21
comment Origin of “suit yourself”
Thank you! I'm really surprised it's not metaphorical, but it makes sense.
May
21
comment Origin of “suit yourself”
Thanks! Wishing I had easy access to the OED!
May
21
comment Would it be correct to say that negative five is less than positive two?
I disagree, since the specific confusion stated here is how to express the correct idea in English. The trouble arises because we have so many ways (in English) of conveying the same basic idea, but in Mathematics a slight change in wording can have dramatic changes in meaning. Perhaps this is true in other spoken languages, but as you alluded to, this site is about English.
May
21
answered Would it be correct to say that negative five is less than positive two?
May
21
asked Origin of “suit yourself”
Jan
3
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
11
awarded  Yearling
Jan
2
accepted When did we start talking about “going viral”?
Dec
31
asked When did we start talking about “going viral”?
Dec
28
comment Time given to fix the problem
Perhaps "given a time span" isn't a good description of what happened in the parable. I'm studying accountability as it relates to parenting. In the KJV that I was reading, the end of verse 2 reads, "for thou mayest no longer..." which, on my first reading sounded like the consequences were not definite yet. So, when the manager attempts to fix the problem, the employer says he did well. That's where the idea of a grace period (again, think 'parenting') came from. Giving children time to correct the problem.
Dec
28
comment Time given to fix the problem
Luke 16:1-12 The Parable of the Unjust Steward.
Dec
28
awarded  Scholar
Dec
28
comment Time given to fix the problem
Thanks! I wasn't aware of this legal phrase. I selected the other answer simply because it seemed to fit with the biblical context a little better.
Dec
28
comment Time given to fix the problem
This is the phrase I was looking for, thanks!