355 reputation
311
bio website jooq.org
location Zurich, Switzerland
age 33
visits member for 3 years
seen Oct 23 at 7:44

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ I am the founder and CEO at
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ Data Geekery GmbH, the
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@ company behind the jOOQ
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@ and jOOX projects.
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@
@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@ @@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@ jOOQ effectively combines
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@ complex SQL, typesafety,
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ source code generation,
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ active records, stored
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@ procedures, advanced data
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@ @@@@ @@@@@@@@@@ types, and Java in a fluent,
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@ @@@@ @@@@@@@@@@ intuitive DSL.
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @ @ @@@@@@@@@@ jOOX is the jquery of Java:
@@@@@@@@@@ @@ @@@@@@@@@@ A simple wrapper for
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ @@@@@@@@@@@@@ the org.w3c.dom package,
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ to allow for fluent XML
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ manipulation.

Oh, and I love ASCII art


Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@JoeBlow: I really like the "xyz Police", and "Stickler of xyz" is also a good substitute, just like "xyz zealot" (as suggested by other answers)
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
I agree. "Police" might really be the best match removing all negative connotation that "Nazi" has
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
"stickler - a person who insists on something unyieldingly". That would be it, I guess. Fascist ist technically correct, but would risk making it more offensive, I guess
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@WS2: Precisely. While it may sound funny to some people in very informal contexts, it's certainly a no-go in most situations
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
Good suggestions. I like "overlord" :-)
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
Interesting, it might work in some occasions. But an "xyz Nazi" is someone who insists in being right, whereas an "xyz freak" just has heavy interest
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
Interesting, I wasn't aware of that term. It seems to have a very negative alternative meaning in British English, though: "deliberately obstructive and unhelpful"
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
@JoeBlow: How I understand it, "xyz Fanatic" is someone who's enthusiast about, but a "xyz Nazi" would be someone who insists on things being done this or that way...
Oct
17
comment Alternative expression for “xyz Nazi”
Yes, that's probably the most accurate term. I wonder though, if it is perceived more negative than "xyz Nazi"...?
Oct
17
comment Is “grammar nazi” politically correct?
I agree with you. I'm German-speaking (although not from Germany) and I'd like to stay clear of this term as well, when I'm not specifically targeting English-speakers. What would be an equivalent term with a similar semantics (funny, slightly reproachful, but not really offensive)? I actually asked this as a question here: english.stackexchange.com/questions/202954/…
Sep
13
comment Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?
@Mitch: True. Formal would better describe it than exotic. Thanks!
Sep
13
comment Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?
@TRiG: You're probably right. By finding it "exotic" I meant finding it "exotic" in the context of generally modifying the object...
Sep
13
comment Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?
@Mitch: Adding, removing, even renaming the set...
Sep
13
comment Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?
Yes. amend really doesn't rectify things in the real-life context. It just modifies things...
Sep
13
comment Is “amend XX” a commonly understood English term to express “add something to XX” or “modify XX”?
That was my impression, too. It seemed to me that amend had a semantics indicating a change of quality that goes with the modification - as opposed to the simple modify