22,334 reputation
4276
bio website hackcraft.net
location Dublin, Ireland
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen yesterday

When not programming I spend much of my free time avoiding the task of writing bios.


Apr
8
comment Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
Yes, "D-Day" was originally a general term, but now is generally associated with the particular D-Day of the 6th of June. Amusingly, twice when my ex-wife was pregnant with our second child, someone asked "when's D-Day?" using a common enough analogy (an analogy that works two ways, as it can also be taken as "Due-Day"), and assumed I was joking when I said "the 6th of June", as she was indeed due then.
Apr
7
revised Does “the N-word” have implications other than a word used for racial discrimination?
Having this word unelided adds nothing that justifies such use.
Apr
1
comment Why is 'allopathy' not an accepted synonym for 'mainstream medicine'?
@BenCrowell ah, I see your comments on the question. That is interesting; I haven't seen such uses in anything later than mid-20th Century myself. It would be interesting to see what a wider search turned up (i.e. where the rest of the remaining hits in ngrams is coming from).
Mar
31
comment Why is 'allopathy' not an accepted synonym for 'mainstream medicine'?
@BenCrowell really? If anything I over-analysed because I addressed the logical flaw in the term. Really, the simpler answer of "because they just don't give a crap what homoeopaths say, so why would they bother using their terms" suffices.
Mar
25
revised “Mass communications shapes the world we live in”
deleted 6 characters in body
Mar
14
comment Single word to describe something that is “meant to be”
"In the stars" seems particularly inappropriate given the context, unless you suggest that massive, luminous spheres of plasma held together by their own gravity had an effect on the choice.
Mar
14
comment Single word to describe something that is “meant to be”
He's not an heir apparent, he really is presenting the show now.
Mar
14
answered Single word to describe something that is “meant to be”
Mar
14
comment Is there an idiom or euphemism for when someone has an average/small penis but knows how to use it?
A related question: Is there any expression used in English for this that doesn't have a stronger effect on making the speaker immediately less sexually attractive than their having a small penis did?
Mar
14
comment Is there an idiom or euphemism for when someone has an average/small penis but knows how to use it?
@DavidM or indeed, "It's not the size of the boat, but does the guy not know how to use his hands and mouth? Oh you poor girl, you need to get him some education".
Mar
6
comment What did we say before “clockwise”?
@Kundor of course I do; I turn left (anti-clockwise) onto the roundabout, and then turn right (clockwise) around the round about until the exit I want, when I then turn left (anti-clockwise) to leave the roundabout. (Unless I'm travelling somewhere where people drive on the right-hand side of the road, and go anti-clockwise around roundabouts, of course).
Mar
2
revised Meaning of “… is king”
Fix ridiculous abbreviation
Mar
2
answered Meaning of “… is king”
Feb
28
comment Is it correct to use 'Forgot password' or 'Forgotten password'
@DavidM, that's because you're American and use derivatives instead of words.
Feb
28
comment Is it correct to use 'Forgot password' or 'Forgotten password'
@DavidM shouldn't worry, it's something gone auld lang syne.
Feb
28
comment Is it correct to use 'Forgot password' or 'Forgotten password'
@DavidM, they aren't entirely wrong, as forgot is also found as a past participle of forget, though now archaic or restricted to poetic use (maybe some dialectical use exists somewhere today).
Feb
28
comment Indian English use of “only”
I find it interesting that while in Ireland we have a similar use of only for emphasis that likewise sounds strange to British or American ears (or other Irish ears, as the use varies by region and class), we don't use it postpositively. "You're only a genius" or "He's only gone and fixed it already" both use only as emphasis by implying that the fact or opinion stated is so startling that it is literally the only thing that could be said. I imagine the Indian use is of similar origin, but it's interesting we do the same thing with the same word, but different syntax.
Feb
28
comment Who's "Her' in Joseph Addison's Cato's Soliloquy?
Your colleague's problems with women, aside, he was plain wrong. Ships, nations, armies, churches and cities are generally considered to be strong things, as indeed was the soul which was conceived of as indestructible and eternal in the metaphysics that most impacted upon English.
Feb
28
comment Why is the Norman genitive used instead of the Saxon genitive in this sentence?
And for that matter, the equivalent Ira's weight also doesn't have the same cadence, or the same sense of that weight that the author conveys by lingering on it that bit longer than the shorter Saxon genitive would.
Feb
28
revised Who's "Her' in Joseph Addison's Cato's Soliloquy?
added 1338 characters in body