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comment Meaning of “down on me” in the Janis Joplin song
A bizarre comment: He was right to apologise for naming her IMO, but that suggests that my statement was indeed correct, no?
May
21
awarded  Nice Answer
May
20
comment Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?
Anyway, "Stick to frigging for a day or two if you like" or "Stick to pulling pudding for a day or two if you like" would have worked much better.
May
20
comment Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?
@Henry, but Triangulate as a survey term would have been a neologism, appropriate only if the character was a specialist not just in surveying, but in doing so using such novel techniques. "Good shit" for open is just a plain anachronism.
May
20
comment Did they say “hand job” in the 1800s?
@JoeBlow as to the why, see this answer. Apostrophes for pluralising numbers is long-standing. I agree that the modern form that avoids it is to be preferred today, but the idea that there is anything novel in doing so is incorrect. Certainly in the 1800s it would have been common to say that they were in the 1800's.
May
15
revised Where does the idiom “root for something” come from?
"sth" for "something" is an abbreviation only really used in dictionaries, particularly translation dictionaries, rather than general use of English.
May
15
comment Another word for “understated sexuality”?
This is a Q&A site, not a forum being pressed into Q&A service. If an answer has provided you with a full answer, then click the checkmark on it. You can also upvote all good answers, rather than just one. Don't add "[solved]" to the title like people do on sites that weren't originally designed for Q&A use.
May
15
revised Another word for “understated sexuality”?
Remove thanks in line with site guidelines.
May
15
revised Another word for “understated sexuality”?
rolled back to a previous revision
May
12
answered Is there a word for someone who is a regular computer user but not an expert?
May
9
awarded  Nice Answer
May
9
answered Word for someone who finds oil reservoirs
May
7
revised When to use a hyphen to coin a new word and when to omit a hyphen?
deleted 1 character in body
May
7
comment When to use a hyphen to coin a new word and when to omit a hyphen?
@BrianHitchcock quite likely, because I over-hyphenate. I tend to delete quite a few hyphens during revision of first drafts. I also tend to leave stack exchange answers at first draft.
May
6
answered Synonym for tsunami
May
3
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
14
comment To reason about
But idiomatic is, ironically enough, not the sum of its parts of idiom and atic: oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/idiomatic "Using, containing, or denoting expressions that are natural to a native speaker"
Apr
14
comment To reason about
No, I mean that while it can be understood as the sum of its parts, it's also a well-used enough pairing to count as a idiom. I think a downvote is fair when you suggest someone re-write one thing to be another completely different thing.
Apr
14
answered To reason about
Apr
14
comment To reason about
Except that it is indeed in being used in its idiomatic meaning, and that's why it sounds correct. Replacing it to "reason it out" would be very wrong, as that does not mean the same thing.