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Apr
24
awarded  american-english
Apr
16
answered What do you call people who live 6 months in city(urban area ), then travel to the village(rural area) and live 6 months. And they do this constantly
Apr
15
revised What is the meaning of “to tween”?
edited body
Apr
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
30
comment What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between
The non-technical senses of binary, such as this, didn't need to leak out of "purely technical contexts".
Mar
19
comment If America has a woman President, will her husband be known as 'The First Gentleman'?
@SimonWhite that's about terms of address, which is not what was asked, though formally there's no such title, so it's not about strict formality.
Mar
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
15
comment English equivalent of Polish saying “A yokel can leave a village, but village will never leave yokel”
@TRiG though that statement may give a false impression of our geography to people who don't know that bog is used as a pejorative term for all rural areas or indeed any town smaller than the larger cities, rather than specifically for bog land.
Mar
8
comment Are there any similar phrases that are popular in the US to express “penny dropped”?
@JohnClifford "penny dropped" is about understanding something, so nothing to do with the other shoe dropping.
Feb
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
24
answered Adjective for 'shite'
Feb
22
comment I sightsaw London. Is this correct?
I've often seen sights when I wasn't sightseeing.
Feb
15
comment What is a raspberry?
@BiscuitBoy it's the opposite here, UD is full of nonsense, but there are occasions when what it contains reflects more than the angry sexual frustration of its contributors. "Raspberry ripple" has had this pejorative meaning since at least 1986. Also the pattern is very much in keeping with rhyming slang patterns.
Feb
8
comment Is “chaperon” versus “chaperone” a US versus British English thing?
Fun fact related to the etymology; the Perrault version of Le Petit Chaperon Rouge*/*Little Red Riding Hood ends with the moral that young girls should not be without their caperon, a pun that would be obvious when one has just read the etymology above, but otherwise doesn't work in translation.
Feb
7
comment Did the “We shall fight on the beaches” speech mainly use words from Old English? If so, why?
@WS2 I don't think he was rallying the French at this point (though he certainly did soon after, Churchill was a great believer in the value of guerrilla action, having observed it in Cuba and lost to it in Ireland as a negotiator of The Threaty), but insulting the French while they were still fighting a retreat alongside BEF soldiers, as many interpretations of the use of the word "surrender" have suggested is not something I can believe he intended.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
It's precise, but whether it's accurate or not depends on whether the difference in meaning is what one wants to convey or not. False precision misses the mark even more than being too general.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
No. It would be a grammatically correct sentence, but its meaning would not be what I would want to convey. Since Norway hasn't sunk into the sea, it's both grammatical and perfectly reasonable.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
No there isn't. "Looks" is only unreasonable if its unreasonable to believe Norway may still bear some resemblance to how it looked at the time.
Feb
3
answered Combining past and present tense