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Apr
14
comment To reason about
But idiomatic is, ironically enough, not the sum of its parts of idiom and atic: oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/idiomatic "Using, containing, or denoting expressions that are natural to a native speaker"
Apr
14
comment To reason about
No, I mean that while it can be understood as the sum of its parts, it's also a well-used enough pairing to count as a idiom. I think a downvote is fair when you suggest someone re-write one thing to be another completely different thing.
Apr
14
answered To reason about
Apr
14
comment To reason about
Except that it is indeed in being used in its idiomatic meaning, and that's why it sounds correct. Replacing it to "reason it out" would be very wrong, as that does not mean the same thing.
Apr
14
comment To reason about
One problem with citing Lewis Carroll is that he would of course deliberately write some strange things, so that he is writing normally here is not necessarily obvious (though he certainly is). Luckily we can add "She could not reason about them as about people whose feelings went by the same rule as her own did." from Woolf's The Voyage Out, "A man, who has to reason about his duty,..." from William Paley and plenty more.
Apr
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
7
comment Where does the expression “cod indignation” originate from?
It's always worth considering that an expression really is just the sum of its parts, and hence in this case looking up cod and indignation in a dictionary.
Mar
31
comment words similar to “abnormal”
On-topic because it asks if this happens or not (a list would answer, but not be required to answer).
Mar
27
comment Is “gaze de naval” English idiom, French idiom or a half-breed?
For an example of a genuine English expression using genuinely French words with correct grammar, see nom de plume, which has been used in English to mean a pen-name since the 19th century while the French would use the more general nom de guerre for all pseudonyms though they borrowed nom de plume back in the 20th century.
Mar
18
comment An adjective for someone who doesn't really care about me
@pyrAmider oh, cavalier would be wrong entirely; not even close.
Mar
16
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
19
comment Illegal Comma to Enhance Clarity
@Omnomnomnom; how is that similar?
Jan
18
comment What is the proper way to write about a “layoff”?
@EdwinAshworth While not the most interesting question, I don't think it's a LMGTFY, but maybe that's just a google-fu failure on my part.
Jan
18
comment Illegal Comma to Enhance Clarity
You put it in to aid clarity? How's that working out?
Jan
18
comment Illegal Comma to Enhance Clarity
No matter who tells you the comma has to be there for good grammar, you should remove it to aid clarity.
Jan
18
revised words similar to “abnormal”
Make enquiry about this happening elsewhere or not, rather than a list.
Jan
18
reviewed Reject “Neither can live while the other survives”— does it make logical sense?
Jan
18
comment On the circuit - what does it mean?
Hmm. I was assuming from the context of the title mentioned that this was about a hypothetical would-be novelist, though it could also be about a character in a novel and hence give a context where "the circuit" meant the comedy, theatre, music circuits, or something else.
Jan
18
comment What is the proper way to write about a “layoff”?
@EdwinAshworth shrug it seemed to me from the question that they'd found all three in use and that was where they were got stuck in wondering what to do.