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Feb
8
comment Is “chaperon” versus “chaperone” a US versus British English thing?
Fun fact related to the etymology; the Perrault version of Le Petit Chaperon Rouge*/*Little Red Riding Hood ends with the moral that young girls should not be without their caperon, a pun that would be obvious when one has just read the etymology above, but otherwise doesn't work in translation.
Feb
7
comment Did the “We shall fight on the beaches” speech mainly use words from Old English? If so, why?
@WS2 I don't think he was rallying the French at this point (though he certainly did soon after, Churchill was a great believer in the value of guerrilla action, having observed it in Cuba and lost to it in Ireland as a negotiator of The Threaty), but insulting the French while they were still fighting a retreat alongside BEF soldiers, as many interpretations of the use of the word "surrender" have suggested is not something I can believe he intended.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
It's precise, but whether it's accurate or not depends on whether the difference in meaning is what one wants to convey or not. False precision misses the mark even more than being too general.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
No. It would be a grammatically correct sentence, but its meaning would not be what I would want to convey. Since Norway hasn't sunk into the sea, it's both grammatical and perfectly reasonable.
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
No there isn't. "Looks" is only unreasonable if its unreasonable to believe Norway may still bear some resemblance to how it looked at the time.
Feb
3
answered Combining past and present tense
Feb
3
comment Combining past and present tense
That second sentence is simply untrue. There are many sentences that change tense correctly.
Jan
29
revised An explanation of the preface in “The Picture of Dorian Gray”
deleted 7 characters in body
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
comment Why is the euphemism “comfort women” so heavily used?
@FumbleFingers we have English-originated terms that were euphemisms (or at least jargon with euphemism as part of their mechanism, if not all) that are similarly used as dysphemisms. Some even simultaneously still being used euphemistically by some while their opponents use them dysphemistically: "Collateral damage" for example.
Jan
11
answered Is puppy a synonym of dog?
Jan
7
comment Polysyllabic Words
@Mitch, "cruth" or "cru-th".
Jan
7
answered Polysyllabic Words
Jan
6
comment Why is the euphemism “comfort women” so heavily used?
I think it (and also "final solution" as you reference) also add specificity (anyone familiar with the term already knows which case precisely you are talking about). Further, the euphemism being so blatant using it brings condemnation of the euphemism itself and with it the sort of regime that would carry out atrocities under such euphemisms. If anything the terms have become dysphemism and express condemnation.
Jan
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
4
answered When is dropping the definite (or indefinite) article permissible and why?
Jan
4
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
4
awarded  Guru
Jan
4
comment Why “the powers that be”?
@curiousdannii it means a form of "be" that is not an auxiliary. Apart from whether this distinction is really useful being disputed by some (see pages.uoregon.edu/tpayne/UEG/…), it's irrelevant here as are can be a "lexical be" if anything can, so this utterly fails to answer the question.
Jan
1
revised When and why did the N-word and “negro” go apart?
Using the offensive word directly adds nothing, so blank some of its letters.