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bio website pureferret.deviantart.com
location Bath, United Kingdom
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Oct 1 at 12:34

I'm a recent graduate with a perchant for Java, Science, Coffee, Games and Cooking!


Dec
13
revised “Director at”, “founder of”. What is the correct usage of “at” and “of”?
corrected word use.
Dec
13
suggested suggested edit on “Director at”, “founder of”. What is the correct usage of “at” and “of”?
Dec
13
comment “Director at”, “founder of”. What is the correct usage of “at” and “of”?
Your phrase 'I meet this' isn't one that's used in English in that context. I think you mean 'I've seen this'.
Dec
13
accepted Original use of kosher in the English lanuage
Dec
13
comment Original use of kosher in the English lanuage
I wasn't really wanting to pin down the exact exchange, but was it known in the colloquial context that early on? @onomatomaniak No I haven't. It wouldn't surprise me if I was told kosher was used in London first, though I understand why it is more prevalent in America/NY.
Dec
13
revised Equivalent word for 'Unfriend' on Social media sites?
Added reference and quotation from comment
Dec
13
comment Single word for people who are like “a frog in the well”
This an excellent answer!
Dec
13
comment Original use of kosher in the English lanuage
But as far as I'm away, kosher used to have the connotation of 'Ritually fit or pure'. Obviously 'When is editing your answer ritually fit' doesn't have the same connotation as 'When is editing your answer acceptable'. When was this change in the English language? Or as far back as the mid 19thC were people asking if it was Kosher for Queen Vicotria to visit common folk at Christmas?
Dec
13
comment Original use of kosher in the English lanuage
But were the connotations the same back in 1851? Was it used in the same context in english speech back then as it was in Yiddish? Or did it, back then, have the modern connotation of something being 'acceptable' rather than 'Ritually fit or pure'?
Dec
13
comment The times they are a-changin'
@Jay I think it must have been changed from "He's a-run" to "He's a-running."
Dec
13
suggested suggested edit on Equivalent word for 'Unfriend' on Social media sites?
Dec
13
asked Original use of kosher in the English lanuage
Dec
12
comment Word for people who buy things because they are more expensive/ for the brand
We tossed the word around a lot at school writing essays, in this context, but I agree it's not the most appropriate.
Dec
11
comment What's the meaning of the word “brand” in the expression “brand new”?
Is it possible to merge this answer with Henry's? Your's would add more detail to his, which is essentially the same, and got there first?
Dec
11
answered Word for people who buy things because they are more expensive/ for the brand
Dec
11
comment Preposition used after “do”
So the implication is that it sounds wrong because of the shared negative connotations of violence and against? Or am I not following you?
Dec
11
comment More formal word for “mover and shaker”
I don't think heavyweight is a good way to describe 'mover and shaker' without more context.
Dec
11
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
11
comment Addressing Professors: Between Dr. and a hard place
Not so Barrie, at my university there are quite a few Professors, and not all of them are heads of the department.
Dec
11
comment Asks a question; never responds to answers/comments
@Mepher Could you expand on that answer? Perhaps giving more detailed reasons you'd pick one of those words? Or even a better description of what they mean?