750 reputation
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location Canada
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Apr 4 at 5:57

May
14
comment Is this a subject verb agreement error?
@Kris Sweet, I guess I'm a genius!
May
13
comment Is this a subject verb agreement error?
@Kris I believe that someone who is rushing to correct papers could read "According to Political Research Associates, who used data gathered by the FBI, recorded hate crimes against Muslims..." and assume (wrongly) that there was an error without bothering to read the sentence through to the end. It's easy to make assumptions in these kind of situations. I've certainly done it.
May
12
comment Is this a subject verb agreement error?
@zpletan A hurried teacher scanning a pile of essays would get as far as recorded and stop thinking there was a missing subject. I agree, though, the sentence could be made a bit easier to parse.
May
11
comment How can I fix the passive voice error in this sentence?
@tchris And they would hate that we use conjunctions at the beginning of our sentences.
May
11
comment How can I fix the passive voice error in this sentence?
@Robusto I see no stylistic problem either. But you just know there are teachers out there rapping students' knuckles over this kind of thing because of their notions of how English ought to be used.
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
@Fr0zenFyr The instances where begin is not permissible have nothing to do with the author's theory (although he tries to shoehorn them into it). Moreover, the suggestion that English speakers prefer start when the action hasn't happened before or occurs suddenly is weak at best.
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
The author has cherry-picked some examples to support his theory which doesn't reflect how English speakers actually use the English language.
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
Past continuous is something like The phone was ringing. There is nothing wrong with using a gerund as the object (or subject) of a verb which is in a past (or future) tense. For example, you can't say that I enjoyed meeting you yesterday is wrong in any way.
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
The to in the sentence is not actually a preposition. It is rather part of the infinitive to ring.
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
@Fr0zenFyr Read the question and answer very carefully. The question is: "What is more correct here?" My answer states "In general they are synonyms."
May
10
comment “began to ring” or “started ringing”?
The ringing in My telephone started ringing has nothing to do with tense and does not suggest that the action is happening at present. It is a gerund and is functionally a noun, not a verb.
May
9
comment Alternative to “façade”
Be careful with "abstraction" since this has a meaning in object-oriented programming languages which may not be appropriate here. An abstract class can never be instantiated.
May
5
comment Divergence in meaning of “just about” between UK and North American English
@Carlo_R. Thanks for the link. It confirms the divergence that I noted. I'm not convinced by the author that the issue is with about indicating an understatement since the regional usage appears consistent. The real difference only appears in the phrase just about.
May
5
comment Divergence in meaning of “just about” between UK and North American English
It really does.
Jan
20
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
@tchrist I've found the problem, and in fact it lies in the font, not TeX and not the reader. There is a StackExchange question which deals with this exact issue: Make ligatures in Linux Libertine copyable (and searchable). Ultimately, it is something to be aware of when creating documents which use typographic ligatures.
Jan
17
comment When should I not use a ligature in English typesetting?
@tchrist I produced a PDF document with XeTeX which contained ligatures which could not be found using a 'tt' text search in my PDF reader. Whether the font, the TeX engine, the PDF reader or some error in my .tex file was to blame, I can not say.
Dec
9
comment Noun describing one who “acts on emotion primally”?
They are coming now: devotee or perhaps even acolyte, if it isn't too esoteric a term.
Dec
8
comment Noun describing one who “acts on emotion primally”?
That most certainly is along the lines that I was thinking.
Dec
8
comment Noun describing one who “acts on emotion primally”?
I said it as a joke since to English speakers the word primate mainly brings monkeys to mind.
Dec
8
comment Noun describing one who “acts on emotion primally”?
It's obvious: the noun form of primal is primate. Doesn't that describe them accurately?