6,689 reputation
1125
bio website english-jack.blogspot.com
location Toronto, Canada
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Nov 12 at 14:42

I teach English for Academic Purposes at Humber College.


Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
12
awarded  Necromancer
Sep
3
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What do we call questions which have a definite, known answer?
Sep
1
comment 'The X-ing of Y' vs just 'X-ing Y' : why are both 'the' and 'of' necessary together?
The difference between a lexical constituent and a phrasal one? Lexical constituents are almost always words. When they are more than words, they are insuperable. These are things link verb, nouns, prepositions, etc. Phrases are a head (lexical) and any associated dependents and adjuncts.
Sep
1
comment 'The X-ing of Y' vs just 'X-ing Y' : why are both 'the' and 'of' necessary together?
@Cerberus, for lexical constituents, yes, I'd say they can never be split. Phrasal constituents can be split.
Aug
31
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What is the difference between 'curricula' and 'curriculum'?
Aug
30
comment Dictionary of English constructions
That list from Ross is more like what I'm looking for. Thank you!
Aug
30
comment Dictionary of English constructions
Thanks, John! I know what you mean about not lending themselves to a dictionary approach. Perhaps list would be a better description. I've read Fillmore, Kay, & O'Connor and I'm aware of Framenet. They're both useful, but not what I'm looking for.
Aug
30
asked Dictionary of English constructions
Aug
28
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Where an ellipsis exists, is there a term for the missing text?
Aug
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Use of Past Simple vs Past perfect in sentences with since
Aug
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on “in” versus “of”
Aug
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Need a word that describes Training and Teambuilding
Aug
27
reviewed Approve suggested edit on a single word or short desciption of a person projecting delusional selflessness after hurting someone
Aug
27
revised 'from' vs. 'by'
clarify
Aug
27
comment 'from' vs. 'by'
In general, adjuncts and modifiers are not particularly choosy. For instance, most nouns (referring the physical objects) can take the adjunct "on the ground" (e.g., "the book on the ground"). Complements are generally more selective (e.g., "an interest in..." not "an interest about..."), and while nouns don't often select complements, I think that this would be such a case.
Aug
27
answered 'from' vs. 'by'