Reputation
7,232
Next privilege 10,000 Rep.
Access moderator tools
Badges
12 26
Impact
~629k people reached

Apr
28
reviewed Reject What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
Apr
28
reviewed Approve Should I use “the” in a list of multiple subjects?
Apr
28
reviewed Reject How is “æ” supposed to be pronounced?
Apr
9
answered “Considering …, the middle-out approach” Is this a dangling modifier?
Apr
9
reviewed Reject Is it correct to say “We will let you know when this option will be available”
Apr
9
reviewed Approve Using “which are” or omitting it
Apr
9
reviewed Approve The use of nominative “whom”
Apr
9
comment Are particular seasons proper nouns?
Absent any evidence for that, I'd call it a personal idiosyncrasy.
Apr
8
comment Are particular seasons proper nouns?
Many people, including elementary teachers, have odd ideas like this.
Feb
12
reviewed Approve Feminism being referred to as equality for all, as opposed to equality for women
Feb
11
answered a word that is commonly used as either an adjective or a noun
Jan
30
comment Using “a tiny” in the same way as “a little”
Not sure what your point is AverageGatsby. 'Tiny/Little' is an adjective functioning as a modifier in the larger NP 'a little bit'.
Jan
28
reviewed Approve Sorry I didn't turn up, I clean forgot. What's the sense of "clean' and its usage hygiene?
Jan
28
comment Using “a tiny” in the same way as “a little”
No, "a little" in "a little happier" is a complex determiner, not an NP.
Jan
28
answered Using “a tiny” in the same way as “a little”
Jan
22
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
16
comment What is the difference between a part of speech and a syntactic function / grammatical relation?
Agreed: adjectives are typically gradable, but not always. You have to consider a constellation of characteristics. The point is somewhat simplified in my answer.
Jan
13
reviewed Approve Predicate or noun after “nationality”
Jan
11
reviewed Reject formal way of saying “I want to”
Jan
11
comment Parts of speech and functions: “Bob made a book collector happy the other day”
I see. I misunderstood @JanusBahsJacquet. Yes, it's a higher-level function name: dependent > adjunct > etc. You could get more specific, but I think this level of generality is appropriate to the question.