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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Jun 9 at 20:33

Mar
13
comment I need an adjective to precede the word “commitment”
@Neon Isn't commitment itself a restraint?
Feb
29
comment “I and someone”, “me and someone” or “I and someone we”
@Jay You really think I and a friend is on the level of a racial slur?
Feb
29
comment “I and someone”, “me and someone” or “I and someone we”
@Jay Sure, I follow it by default in case someone is deeply offended by their pronoun's ordering. But not treating it as an absolute rule of grammar allows one to avoid awkwardness like other members of JNAS and I or he shot the postman as well and me.
Feb
29
comment “I and someone”, “me and someone” or “I and someone we”
That's a silly rule, and it has nothing to do with grammar.
Feb
14
comment What's a word that can mean both “good” and “bad”?
Why not shocking?
Feb
12
comment A few more “hundred” vs “hundreds”
I'd suggest buy a slightly faster CPU. "A few hundred more MHz for your CPU" sounds like you're taking a CPU to the computer store and asking them to sprinkle on 600 MHz.
Feb
11
comment Is the 're' in 'return' and 'repeat' a prefix?
I don't know if re- in return is so clearly a prefix. The Latin tornāre much more strongly implied turning in a circle, to give return a meaning of "come back" which isn't captured by re-turn, "turn again."
Feb
5
comment In soccer, is there “a goal” or “goals” at each end of the pitch?
@romkyns In cases like scissors where there's no singular form, a dictionary will always note that. Look there when in doubt.
Jan
30
comment What does “five O” mean (and why)?
@Malvolio 1990 and later CVPIs had a 4.6 L Modular V8, but in the '80s LTD CVs had a 5.0 L Windsor V8. Regardless, Hawaii Five-O aired 10 years earlier – so it's still the most likely explanation.
Jan
27
comment Adverb of “English”
Anglice must be capitalized, and n.b. it's pronounced ANG-li-see.
Jan
26
comment When to write the word “parenthetically”
In the paper, if that sentence were enclosed in parentheses, the entire paragraph would need to be there too. Just saying parenthetically is the least awkward option. And possibly it implies a bit of "they make us say this, you know."
Jan
26
comment Word for object in programming that connects to relay
Or just client?
Jan
23
comment Correlation vs Causation
The "correlation, not causation" thing is idiomatic. It just means "that's bad statistics," even if they recognize the minor, indirect causative avenue.
Jan
15
comment What exactly is a “figure” in a scientific paper?
If you have multiple algorithms presented like that, you should label them as "Algorithm n" and have a separate List of Algorithms alongside the List of Figures and List of Tables. Unless your style guide prohibits that, of course.
Jan
14
comment Title Capitalization of Keywords in Programming Languages
+1. Dive into Python uses lower-cased keywords in a medium fixed-width font, even though its headings are in all-caps with a black proportional font. It clashes a bit, sure – but it doesn't draw the stares that an upper-cased int would.
Jan
9
comment Correct preposition for 'feature'
Some editors and style guides are pickier about prepositions. CMS 16 has a section (5.191: "List of words and the prepositions construed with them") which assigns specific prepositions to some verbs.
Dec
27
comment Word meaning “not normal, but relatively normal in context”
A passage like that in fiction probably wouldn't be so explicit. Compare: "The ritual involves self-mutilation, human sacrifice, and humming "Sugar, Sugar" for three hours atop a skyscraper‌​." Show, don't tell.
Dec
23
comment To acknowledge or clear an error condition?
The "standard error responses" are abort, retry, and fail, now more commonly just retry and cancel. Can't hurt to stick with the classics.
Dec
23
comment “Take a rest” or “have some rest”?
Maybe see here. Also, "get some rest" is much more common than "have some rest."
Dec
19
comment Is there a word that means “make someone (or something) redundant”?
Well, there is some debate over it, but obviate may be used without the need for part.