19,174 reputation
455108
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location Pennsylvania
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen 2 hours ago

Motto: I'd enjoy the day more if it started later.

I was born and raised in southern California, but my first language was actually Hungarian. I currently reside in eastern Pennsylvania.


9h
comment What is the English equivalent for this Spanish saying?
This is coming across as a translation request (which would make it off-topic). Could you at least make the title all-English?
12h
revised Usage of 'customs' in lieu of 'immigration'
I got annoyed by the downvote
13h
comment Usage of 'customs' in lieu of 'immigration'
Downvoter: care to comment? What the [ahem] is incorrect about this answer?
1d
awarded  Synonymizer
Apr
16
comment Something of value that is worthless in the current context?
@bonh: the "water to a drowning man" metaphor reflects that harmful idea: what a drowning man needs is less water, not more.
Apr
14
comment Is “something appetite” correct as a noun?
@tehwalrus: actually, pub names aren't random. They come from sign names - a pub that had a mermaid on its sign would come to be called The Mermaid, while a pub that had a green elephant on its sign would be called The Green Elephant. Thus, you wouldn't find a pub called "The Yard" or "The Promotion" — or "The Appetite" — because you can't draw those on a sign.
Apr
14
comment Is there more than a 'double' whammy?
What exactly do you think "double whammy" means? Because as the definition you quoted demonstrates, "triple whammy" means precisely what it sounds like it means: a double whammy, only more so.
Apr
10
comment Is there a word for a driver who changes lanes often?
That's an interesting suggestion, but I'm not finding any support for it - searching for "zordlock" returns WoW player profiles, mostly. Do you have any articles or links to back up your assertion?
Apr
9
comment What Is the Real Name of the #?
@MichelAyres: "first" is abbreviated 1st. And #1 is pronounced "number one", never as just "one".
Apr
9
comment What Is the Real Name of the #?
This answer is missing the name "hash" or "hash mark". ("Hashtag" is a red herring: it was named for the hash mark, not the other way around.)
Apr
9
comment What is a word for assigning a number to a value?
@user2738698: I think perhaps you mean elicit "call forth", not illicit "contrary to law". :)
Apr
5
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
4
comment What do you call the action of making desserts?
Hungarian has a word for the occupation: cukrász, which comes from cukor "sugar" + -ász "one who works with or is an expert in". (Noun and verb forms follow naturally: cukrászság, cukrászkodás.) A parallel English construction would be something like "sugarer". If that doesn't work for you, you can always just move to Hungary. :)
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@Kristina, I have provided cited evidence of another source of that expression: it rhymes. It sounds cutesy. QED. Or to put it another way: you didn't design that cup either, so you can't know what was going through the design person's head. Your interpretation is no more likely than mine, yours is just, well, meaner. Less PC. Ascribing malice where ignorance would suffice.
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@KristinaLopez: surely you don't need a citation to prove that "workee" and "coffee" have the same ending? That the last two letters of "coffee" have been tacked onto the word "work"? That the resulting expression is fully natural English, apart from the non-word "workee"? That if I have never heard of "no tickee no washee", it cannot possibly be anything other than coincidence that it sounds very similar to the playful rhyme I just made up?
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@KristinaLopez: why on earth would I need to cite a source for my experience? And the very fact that I was able to have that experience disproves your assertion. You're saying that "x always derives from y", while I'm saying that "I came up with x, and I've never heard of y, so obviously x does not always derive from y".
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
Mynamite, what exactly is the pronunciation difference between "coffy" and "coffee"? Do you really pronounce "coffee" on its own differently than the "coffee" in "no workee no coffee"? Personally, I don't see how that's possible...
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
@KristinaLopez: you keep repeating that as if it were irrefutable truth, but the fact that smithkm, Motes, and many other people (including me) just thought it was simple playful rhyming proves that it can and does arise as, well, simple playful rhyming.
Apr
4
comment No coffee, no workee - meaning
I, too, had never heard of the Chinese pidgin examples, and I don't think it necessary to read that into things in this case. The -ee on "workee" is simply a playful way to make "work" rhyme with "coffee". It could have, and in many cases probably did, "appear out of a vacuum", because it's simply copying the last two letters of one word and tacking them on to the other. (Surely you're not arguing that "no [x], no [y]" is not a native English construct?)
Apr
1
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
The Hungarian term for this "one of these things is not like the others, one of these things just doesn't belong" concept is kakukktojás "cuckoo's egg". There is a whiff of "cuckold" behind it, but that is not the primary meaning.