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1d
comment Colors = Crayons?
This is true for California as well.
1d
comment Colors = Crayons?
I don't think "crayon = waxy non-toxic coloring stick" is a regionalism, or if it is, it's a very widespread one (covering all of the US at least). What the question is asking about is "color = waxy non-toxic coloring stick", which emphatically IS a regionalism, and one that's Totally Wrong to people who aren't covered by the affected region.
1d
comment Colors = Crayons?
For what it's worth, I've never encountered this usage of "colors". To my mind, it's totally wrong: wax crayons may be ubiquitous in schools, but to equate such an inferior coloring implement with "coloring", as if no other possibility existed, is ... I have no words, it's so wrong.
1d
comment Colors = Crayons?
@HotLicks: a coloring book is called that because the intent is to add color (as in red, blue, yellow, green, etc.) to the pictures. There is absolutely no implication about what medium those colors will be in (wax, chalk, alcohol, water, acrylic, oil, whatever).
1d
comment Why “half past” and not “half to”?
@FumbleFingers - To my American-English-raised, Hungarian-influenced ear, "half seven" ought to be 6:30 (because that's what it is if you translate it word-for-word to Hungarian). In any case, American English simply does not use "half seven": it sounds nonsensical and ungrammatical.
2d
comment Is there a single word for when something becomes neglected or forgotten (e.g. a plant dies because the gardener forgets to water it)?
"The derelict petunia still clung to tiny bits of green near its stem, but it was clearly past rescue." A bit poetic, maybe, but understandable.
2d
revised Is there a single word for when something becomes neglected or forgotten (e.g. a plant dies because the gardener forgets to water it)?
fixed typo introduced by previous editor
Aug
30
comment The meaning of 0% and 100% as opposed to other percentages?
I think I liked this answer better when it still talked about soup. :D
Aug
21
comment 'Brew' for a hot drink. Internationally understood?
Echoing all the comments above: in North America, brew as a noun is an informal word for beer. As a verb, it can refer to coffee, tea, or potions, but not really as a noun. (I disagree with VampDuc: I can, and do, brew tea.)
Aug
18
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
15
answered What rhetorical gain is expected by saying “Do they really not understand why?” instead of “Don’t they really understand why?”
Aug
13
comment Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
In my world, "just scraping by" means "barely able to make ends meet".
Aug
12
comment What does “for comfort” in “too fast (close / hot/ warm / crammed) for comfort” mean?
... or uncomfortably close, or uncomfortably hot, or....
Aug
12
comment What does “for comfort” in “too fast (close / hot/ warm / crammed) for comfort” mean?
The way to parse this is: if it hadn't been so [insert adjective here], then you could have remained comfortable, but as it was, it got [insert adjective here] enough that it made you uncomfortable.
Aug
10
comment What does “mphm” mean?
Exactly this. "mphm" is this author's way to write "hmph" without implying any annoyance. Other ways to write the same general "noncommittal grunt" are "mmm" (but that can sound like you're trying to imply "yum") and "hm" (but that can sound like you're implying a question).
Aug
8
comment How to pronounce “favicon”?
@JanusBahsJacquet: as far as I can remember, the design person's pronunciation was "extremely odd": it did, indeed, sound kind of like "a vegan" with an f at the front, except with the stress on the "a" instead of "veg". So /FAV-ee-can/, /fav/ rhyming with "have", /ee/ with, well, "eek", and /can/ as in the word that means "able to" or "metal container for preserving food" (except that since that syllable doesn't have any sort of stress, the vowel becomes kind of smudged/schwa-like).
Aug
7
comment What are lexemes and morphemes?
If you need to know the meaning of a word, the place to look is a dictionary. Just saying.
Aug
6
comment How do I pronounce my surname?
Surely "sull-chee" is a much better approximation at the correct pronunciation, and just as understandable to English speakers as "sull-chay"?
Aug
6
comment A eulogy for someone who isn't dead?
Besides not having an upvoted answer, the other question also specifies "not implying praise", which means it's looking for quite a different class of words.