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1d
comment What was the original pronunciation of 'Zounds'?
@StoneyB: the reason I keep my twin sister around is so she can do the IPA stuff. :) (She minored in linguistics. I minored in history, thankyouverymuch.)
1d
comment What was the original pronunciation of 'Zounds'?
@sumelic, no, born and barn are distinct -- the latter has the same vowel as war, car, warm, and farm, while born has a very similar vowel to word and cord. So I've gotta ask all of you: do worm and warm sound the same to you? 'Cause that'd be... strange.
1d
comment What was the original pronunciation of 'Zounds'?
@PeterShor: for me, war and car have the same vowel, as do warm and farm, and word and cord. In my head (which is the only place I usually need to "pronounce" them), I see no problem with wad rhyming with cad or wan with can, though if I say them out loud, I can see how that makes me sound like I'm from Boston or something. (I'm actually from Southern California.) My point, to the extent that I have one, is that I'm not sure you can blame all this variation on that poor /w/. :)
1d
comment What was the original pronunciation of 'Zounds'?
I don't know if the /w/ can really account for wound not rhyming with bound, because as the past tense of wind, wound does rhyme with bound.
Jul
31
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
31
comment What do you call this sound in English?
Can you try to spell what sound you believe the blinds make? And/or post a picture of the type of window blind you mean? (Also, as Michael tried to explain, a "flourish" is a decoration, so we're not sure what you're trying to express with "open a window blind with a flourish".)
Jul
31
comment What do you call someone who knows multiple programming languages?
You call a person who knows multiple programming languages a "programmer". You call someone who knows only one programming language a "beginner" (if you're being kind; otherwise, "hack" or "wannabe" spring to mind). To illustrate why, I program in classic ASP. To do so, I need to know, at minimum, VBScript, html, css, and SQL; and to be really effective in today's world, I also need to know JavaScript. That's five languages, just to program in a single environment.
Jul
30
comment Ellipsis after a comma
Clearly, if you're writing out the entire sentence, you need both commas; nobody is questioning that. However, if you're leaving out most of the sentence, and indicating this fact with ellipses, then why should the grammar of the omitted part have any relevance?
Jul
29
comment How to pronounce fractions larger than a twentieth, where the last digit of the denominator is a 1 or a 2? i.e. one thirtieth is to 30 as _ is to 31
@tchrist: please re-read both questions. They are definitely not duplicates.
Jul
29
comment How to pronounce fractions larger than a twentieth, where the last digit of the denominator is a 1 or a 2? i.e. one thirtieth is to 30 as _ is to 31
This is not a duplicate of the cited question: that one specifically excludes the usual "seven eighths" type of expression (dunno why), and doesn't really even mention the real question here, i.e. what happens to 1 and 2 when they happen to be the last digit of the denominator.
Jul
28
comment What does bimonthly really mean?
@NeilMeyer: I don't know, but if I put "bimonthly" in the search box, the second result is the previously-answered question.
Jul
20
awarded  Guru
Jul
18
comment Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?
I'm conflicted: the OP seems determined to misunderstand my point and still hasn't actually posted any sources, just semi-snide remarks about where to find said sources, so I would dearly love to downvote this; but typecasting is also clearly the correct answer to this question. I think I must downvote, nonetheless.
Jul
17
comment Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?
@WithScience: I don't know. What does that article say about typecasting re: whether it applies to specific roles rather than just types of roles?
Jul
17
comment Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?
(This is related to, but not the same issue as, Google is not General Reference.) Basically, if all you're doing is pointing the user to the general vicinity of where an answer could be found if sufficient diligence were applied, then you're not really answering the question.
Jul
17
comment Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?
Precisely the problem: just because you found something relevant, today, in your particular environment, doesn't mean that six months from now I won't put your search terms into my search engine and find precisely... nothing. Not to mention, even if I do get something, how do I (as someone who doesn't already know the answer) figure out whether the pages I found are truly relevant or utter balderdash?
Jul
17
comment Expression for when an actor has become so associated with a role that it becomes difficult to 'unsee'?
Rather than listing the search terms by which your particular search engine on this particular day on your particular computer with your particular browsing history happened to return results that your experience allowed you to interpret as useful, please actually post some relevant quotes (properly attributed, of course). Also, for the one link you did include, please summarize what it has to say and/or post a relevant quote, because link rot is a fact of life on the internet.
Jul
14
comment Usage of Filial
Well, this is a novel way to phrase one of our most frequently asked questions.
Jul
14
revised Interpreting trucker lingo
The fact that this will get translated is irrelevant to ELU; the question is actually "what do these mean?"
Jul
14
revised What does the west wind signify to New Yorkers?
added 1002 characters in body