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2d
comment Term for the person working with chocolate
@NVZ: no, we don't welcome general reference questions. Show me a general reference specifically designed to authoritatively answer this type of question. (Hint: Google is designed to help find websites. It is not a general reference resource for any question that would on topic at ELU.)
2d
comment Term for the person working with chocolate
@DavidRicherby: yeah, so?
Apr
21
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
We refer to D&V as "two exits, no waiting". :)
Apr
21
revised Euphemism for diarrhea
added 16 characters in body
Apr
21
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
@NVZ: "stomach bug" doesn't imply anything about contagiousness. The problem with "upset stomach" is that it's simply wrong: it doesn't mean diarrhea. In fact, it specifically means "a stomach ailment that doesn't involve diarrhea". At least in my world.
Apr
21
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
People who are upvoting this need to re-read the question. These suggestions would be HIGHLY inappropriate in an email to the boss. Maybe not bad enough to get fired, but certainly WAY worse than just saying "I have diarrhea".
Apr
21
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
@HotLicks: yes, I checked. I read every single answer. "Stomach flu/bug" has only been suggested in an answer that then goes on to suggest a whole bunch of increasingly inappropriate (and in some cases, outright disgusting) phrases, and in comments on a few other answers.
Apr
21
comment Euphemism for diarrhea
I've only ever encountered "upset stomach" as either literal (dyspepsia), or a euphemism for nausea/vomiting. It doesn't imply anything gastroenteritis-like, and more importantly, it's not contagious.
Apr
20
answered Euphemism for diarrhea
Apr
11
comment “May I know what the status of my application is” or “May I know what is the status of my application?”
Can you explain why you think doubling the "is" could possibly be correct?
Apr
8
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
As a native speaker of American English, I don't know if I'd interpret "tomorrow" as "some indefinite time in the future", not matter how the emphasis was placed. But this does remind me of "6 to 8 weeks", which is programmer code for "yeah, we know it needs fixing, but don't hold your breath".
Apr
8
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
@NVZ: Martha is my real, actual name. I'm not nearly old enough to be Batman's mom (I'm about the same age as Ben Affleck), and passing off Superman as my kid, even an adopted one, would be a real stretch. And I still haven't scraped the time together to see the danged movie.
Apr
7
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
I have multiple round tuits. Doesn't seem to help. There must be something special about how you acquire said round tuit.
Apr
7
comment What is the equivalent of Persian idiom “When the reed blooms”?
I know the OP doesn't like this one, but he's wrong: there's nothing rude about it, and it is, hands down, the most common idiomatic expression for something that'll never happen.
Mar
23
comment What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?
This is the correct answer. Basically, you find a parking space in a parking lot, while you find a parking spot along the street (although, as usual with language, there's overlap, especially in spoken usage).
Mar
23
comment What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?
Note that to us non-antipodean folks, a "park" is an open space with grass and trees and maybe a playground. Your "there's a park out the front" would never in a million years be interpreted as having anything whatsoever to do with parking a vehicle.
Mar
15
comment What is the English word that means “making something more broadly known and understood”?
@WS2: on the contrary, I think promulgate is the perfect word to use here, since it carries a connotation/side meaning of "put into effect". I don't think it's a portentous word at all.
Mar
8
comment “You are the first one to ask me.” vs “You are the first one asking me”
@MετάEd: OK, so my numbers are a bit hyperbolic. It may just be a Hungarian-native-speaker thing, but both my mom and my boss love to overuse the continuous tenses, so my default answer to "is it asking or to ask" is "it's never asking, but what's the context?".
Mar
7
comment “You are the first one to ask me.” vs “You are the first one asking me”
Rule of thumb: in general, everyday usage, if you're trying to decide whether to use a continuous tense vs. a non-continuous tense, 99.9% of the time, the non-continuous tense is correct, and in the remaining .1% of the time, the non-continuous tense is probably also correct. But if you're asking a question like this, you might feel more welcome at the English Language Learners site.
Mar
7
comment “You are the first one to ask me.” vs “You are the first one asking me”
@MετάEd: I don't think that's quite the same question. It's asking about which choice (gerund or infinitive) should follow a verb, but here the thing under question is the verb (ask) itself. (Unless you consider "to be" the only verb in both sentences, which would be a, um, novel approach.)