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1d
comment What is potass?
I actually encountered a "low sodium club soda" which was, essentially, potass, i.e. carbonated water with potassium bicarbonate added. (Regular club soda is carbonated water with sodium bicarbonate added.)
2d
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
5
reviewed Approve Term for: Simultaneous rare experience/occurrence
Feb
5
comment Date as a synonym for anus
I would think it's referring to the "boyfriend/girlfriend" meaning of "date", and it "means" certain specific body parts only by way of metonymy.
Feb
4
revised Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
I really think this is the best answer, and I'm disappointed it hasn't been voted higher. Maybe explaining exactly why it's the perfect answer would help?
Feb
3
comment What difference these meanings?
Please don't ask the same question repeatedly. Instead, use the edit link to improve your original question.
Feb
3
reviewed Close What difference these meanings?
Feb
3
comment What difference these meanings?
Possible duplicate of What differences are between "What's that? " and " What is it?"
Feb
3
reviewed Close What differences are between “What's that? ” and “ What is it?”
Feb
3
reviewed Looks OK Using partially redundant phrases such as “blatantly obvious” in a sentence for emphasis
Feb
3
reviewed Edit Is it considered offensive to describe someone as a Saracen?
Feb
3
revised Is it considered offensive to describe someone as a Saracen?
Fixed capitalization (or lack thereof), mostly.
Feb
3
reviewed Looks OK “Digital computer” in the 1940s
Feb
3
reviewed Edit What / Which would you like more of?
Feb
3
revised What / Which would you like more of?
use-mention distinction
Feb
3
reviewed Reviewed Is the last word in “The past is ____.” ‘past’ or ‘passed’?
Feb
3
revised Is the last word in “The past is ____.” ‘past’ or ‘passed’?
Fixed capitalization (or lack thereof), mostly.
Feb
2
revised Do tenses in a time clause never back-shift in reported speech?
Clarified phoning John vs. speaking to Maria
Feb
1
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
I've only encountered the "all hat, no cattle" expression in contexts where it means that someone is trying to substitute money for ability/talent/practice. They're too lazy to actually do the hard work required, but they have lots of cash, so they buy all the clothes and accessories so they can pretend. Thus, in a sense this is the opposite meaning to what the OP wanted.
Feb
1
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
Another American here, but I do recognize the idiom, and would interpret it as the Oxford Dictionary definition describes.