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463126
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location Pennsylvania
age 43
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 11 hours ago

Motto: I'd enjoy the day more if it started later.

I was born and raised in southern California, but my first language was actually Hungarian. I currently reside in eastern Pennsylvania.

Fair warning: if you commit a pun, you will be THWACKED.


2d
comment Why is Greece not called in English by the name Hellas?
You think "Greece" is incorrect? At least it's based on historical fact. Y'all call Hungary by that name because 8th century writers couldn't keep their invading tribes straight.
Jan
27
comment Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?
As with many other similar questions, the rule is simple: you look it up in the dictionary, and see which form(s) you find there. :)
Jan
27
comment Ungrammatical: “Half the boys jumped, but only a quarter of the girls did.”?
@YoustayIgo: it is perfectly clear what the activity was. Grammatically as well as semantically, the only possibility is "jumped", because there isn't any other verb present. Introducing superfluous other words (especially "that" - in fact, your version ending with "that" sounds outright incorrect to me) just adds ambiguity that wasn't present to begin with.
Jan
27
revised Ungrammatical: “Half the boys jumped, but only a quarter of the girls did.”?
spelling in the title, use-mention distinction
Jan
27
comment Ungrammatical: “Half the boys jumped, but only a quarter of the girls did.”?
I think the original version is much better than any of your proposed alternatives, and I disagree that there's anything at all unclear about it.
Jan
25
comment Is there a specific word for pen maker?
There's unlikely to be a word for this, because it wasn't traditionally a separate profession: every scribe made his own pens.
Jan
20
comment Idiom for preparing very very thoroughly. ( take a lot of stuff for doing smth)
@Oldbag: I chortled at "You forgot to take the curtains". I'll have to try to remember that one.
Jan
20
comment Idiom for preparing very very thoroughly. ( take a lot of stuff for doing smth)
@Oldbag: sure, but it's used all the time for over-preparing, too.
Jan
20
comment Idiom for preparing very very thoroughly. ( take a lot of stuff for doing smth)
All of the "the whole [insert item here]" idioms mean something more like "the entire thing" or "completely", not "oh, no, I can't leave this [spray-painted macaroni picture frame|decorative salt shaker|tennis racket with broken strings|shirt that hasn't fit me in 10 years] at home, I might need it". Granted, I don't know what the Russian idiom implies, either, so maybe it does mean something more like "completely".
Jan
20
answered Idiom for preparing very very thoroughly. ( take a lot of stuff for doing smth)
Jan
20
comment Is there any English/American equivalent for the Hungarian phrase “beating the nettle with someone else's penis”?
@trlkly: 1. The Hungarian phrase isn't all that common. 2. I'm not entirely certain which came first, the vulgar version or the non-vulgar version. (Certainly, the non-vulgar version makes more literal sense.)
Jan
20
comment What is the difference between /tr/ & /tʃ/?
This question seems ideally suited to ell.stackexchange.com. It's not that it's off-topic here; it's just that you're likely to receive more useful answers on ELL. (For example, the proposed duplicate, which is really missing the point.)
Jan
19
comment Can “crouch” be used to indicate motion?
Yes, crouch can signify movement: namely, the movement you make to change from a standing to a crouching position. It's not a movement that will get you from point A to point B. I would interpret your example as a non-native speaker's attempt to say "I crouched down at the edge of the cliff...".
Jan
17
comment Is there any English/American equivalent for the Hungarian phrase “beating the nettle with someone else's penis”?
You're answering a question which has "penis" in its title. I hardly think it's necessary to apologize for vulgarity, or to censor your answer.
Jan
16
comment Is there any English/American equivalent for the Hungarian phrase “beating the nettle with someone else's penis”?
This often occurs as "más farkával veri a csalánt", i.e. he's beating the nettles with someone else's tail. Now, "tail" can be a euphemism for "penis" in both Hungarian and English, but on the other hand, a dog or a horse that falls into a patch of nettles will literally beat the plants with its tail... I wonder which version (faszával or farkával) occurs first.
Jan
16
comment Is there an English idiom for trying to do two things at the same time and failing at both of them due to splitting your effort?
@RichArmstrong, I think this means precisely what your question asks for. The image it conveys is of someone trying to sit on two stools at once, intending some sort of one-cheek-on-each awkward compromise, but ending up sitting on the floor between two toppled stools. Thus, it's the perfect idiom for someone who, instead of picking one task to do well, tries to achieve two tasks, only to fail at both.
Jan
12
answered What word means what I think “implorements” means?
Jan
6
comment Meryl Streep is a ______? (as a big compliment)
"Diva" is almost always pejorative these days.
Jan
5
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
2
awarded  Notable Question