19,808 reputation
459119
bio website
location Pennsylvania
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 2 hours ago

Motto: I'd enjoy the day more if it started later.

I was born and raised in southern California, but my first language was actually Hungarian. I currently reside in eastern Pennsylvania.


9h
comment Dishes 3 part job or not?
1. Rinsing the dishes before putting them in the dishwasher wastes water and doesn't get anything any cleaner, 2. Anyone who believes otherwise is a heretical lunatic, and 3. I think I like you, you heretical lunatic. :)
15h
awarded  Nice Answer
15h
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@Kris: I don't think you quite understood the question.
15h
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@Nate: I haven't used any actual profanity yet, but I might have to resort to it, because there are now FOUR IDIOTS who think this is general reference. I swear, we should make it a requirement that before you can use that close reason, you have to provide a link to a dictionary that perfectly answers the question.
15h
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@talrnu, it's very, very hard to Google this topic - even NGrams mostly returns results that are actually "somebody did something for three days, dying...". However, wading through the Google Books results to find the 19th century novels that actually use the construction in question, confirms my impression from a lifetime of reading that this phrasing was simply not used in cases where the subject recovered.
15h
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@xtraorange: that's precisely what I said in the second paragraph.
1d
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
To the @#@$#@# who voted to close this as general reference, I challenge you to provide ANY sort of link that explains this construction. (No, a link to the dictionary definition of the word "die" or "dying" does not qualify.) I just spent the better part of an hour looking, and I found NOTHING.
1d
answered What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
2d
revised Metaphors similar to “Trojan Horse”
the unnecessary definite article was bugging me
2d
comment What is the difference between Seventh Heaven and Cloud Nine?
@JoeBlow: I think "Earth to cloud nine" might be a relative of "it's not rocket surgery": it's a combination of idioms (in this case, of "Earth to [insert name here]" and "he's on cloud nine") that doesn't really make sense unless you're familiar with the constituent idioms. As a result, if you're only familiar with the mashup, you're forced to assign a meaning to it based on context, and the meaning you assign might not be correct.
2d
comment What is the difference between Seventh Heaven and Cloud Nine?
@JoeBlow: I've never heard that usage. In my world, "cloud nine" is indeed a synonym of "seventh heaven". If someone is off in daydream-land, the usual phrase is "Earth to [insert name here]".
Jul
29
comment What is the name of the small containers of half & half, etc.?
"I'd like four creams" falls under metonymy/synecdoche: you're naming the thing for what it contains — if the thing contains something else, the name doesn't transfer. They make ketchup containers these days that greatly resemble a half-and-half container, but you wouldn't say "I'd like 4 ketchup creams"; you'd just stick to "I'd like 4 ketchups". Which is all well and good in everyday usage, but if you're trying to refer to the containers, not the contents thereof, you're stuck with circumlocutions like "those thingies that contain half-and-half".
Jul
29
comment What is the name of the small containers of half & half, etc.?
I think I agree with @quixoto: the little cups are called "creamers" via metonymy and/or synecdoche (I always get those two confused), not because they're miniature plastic analogues of a particular part of a tea set. If you put ketchup in a similar container, you'll find yourself asking for "three ketchups, please"; you wouldn't say "three ketchup creamers".
Jul
28
comment word: fridges that keep things hot (and not cold)
@meustrus: I don't think it's splitting hairs to point out that the question Peter is answering is actually off-topic for this site. And dunno about you, but I'm not sure I ever want to meet a heat lamp that resembles a refrigerator. (We are talking about an existing appliance, btw, or at least an existing class of appliances.)
Jul
28
revised Terminology for “New Yorker” vs “lives in New York”
tags, added example from the OP's comment which I think illustrates his question very well
Jul
28
comment word: fridges that keep things hot (and not cold)
@JoeBlow, a bain-marie is where you put a dish into hot water to heat it up, instead of putting it directly over the fire. The French Wikipedia image is of a double boiler, in fact. The other link has an image of a steam table. In no way shape or form can any such device be described as "looks like a fridge".
Jul
28
comment word: fridges that keep things hot (and not cold)
The question isn't what to use to keep food warm, but what to call an appliance that keeps food warm.
Jul
28
comment word: fridges that keep things hot (and not cold)
"Hot box" is the term that came immediately to my mind. Admittedly, what little food-service experience I have is now over 20 years old, so terminology might have changed.
Jul
25
comment “silk purses out of a sow's ears”
@medica: ... so?
Jul
25
reviewed Leave Closed This weekend vs Next weekend