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3h
comment What does “a Kosher ham” signify in the line, “Stone described himself as a kosher ham ready to go to the opening of door.”?
I wonder if he meant "ham" as in "comedian".
1d
comment Proper name used for memorializing
1. "Purchased from" means that aunt and nephews/nieces are in business together, and they own a store which sells commemorative plaques. This is presumably not what you mean. 2. What does this have to do with English language and usage?
May
18
comment Baby girl names that are close to “Buddy”, her dad's birth name?
@TimRomano: name derivations are never 100% certain, but behindthename.com (which tends to be more accurate than most, at least for English names) says about Buddy "It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother." (By "nursery form", I believe they mean "baby talk".) If the OP wants to edit the question to be purely onomastics, not naming-of-things-or-people, she's welcome to do so, but again, as currently phrased, this is asking for opinions, not data.
May
18
comment Baby girl names that are close to “Buddy”, her dad's birth name?
@TimRomano, the question as phrased is 100% opinion based. If it were something like "Does the name 'Buddy' have a feminine equivalent?", then maybe it could be answered, but the answer is likely to be not too useful to the expectant parents (since Buddy is derived from brother, the female version would be Sissy).
May
18
comment Why is Peruvian Brown so named?
I don't know what the pigment originally was for Peruvian Brown, but it seems probable that it was an earth pigment. Thus, the origin of the name is that it was derived from a particular shade of mud found in Peru, akin to Verona Green, or heck, Sienna (burnt or otherwise). But this is more an art history question than an English Language & Usage one. (Also, I don't know for a fact what the pigment is/was for Peruvian Brown, so I'm only posting this as a comment, not an answer.)
May
18
comment Baby girl names that are close to “Buddy”, her dad's birth name?
Hi Marilyn. I'm curious: what about this site gave you the idea that it was a suitable place to ask advice about baby names? For actual help, I'll echo Catija: both the babynamewizard and nameberry forums are set up specifically for expecting parents like you, and are very friendly and helpful.
May
15
comment Why do we say kith & kin and not kin & kith?
I agree that "fork and knife" sounds unremarkable, and "eggs and bacon", while not usual, isn't jarring. The rest of your examples would sound Totally Wrong if reversed.
May
14
comment What is the best word (or term) to identify pronouncing W's for L's and R's?
Burr is related, but not really the same thing. (I found burr given as the translation of Hungarian raccsolás, which is a speech impediment where the subject is unable to properly roll his Rs, instead producing a sound more akin to H, almost like the CH in Bach.)
May
14
comment The Difference Between “I just love you” and “I love you”
I'm having a hard time coming up with a context where "I just love you" makes any sense. Where did you hear/see this? Please edit your question to include more details.
May
13
comment I have stomach ache vs I have 'a' stomach ache
Sorry, but you're incorrect. All of those aches sound strange (read: wrong) without the article. Perhaps you're conflating the verb with the noun? "My stomach aches" naturally doesn't use an article. [Interesting historical note: Victorian novels often have their heroines suffering from the headache, rather than a headache. Dunno the reasoning behind that.]
May
9
comment A word for a memoir written by someone else?
A memoir is just a type of autobiography, so if someone else wrote it, it's still a biography.
May
5
comment Word for “Can't be seen with the naked eye”?
The sun's visibility, or lack thereof, is not in any way affected by whether your eyes are closed or not. "The sun is not visible at noon if it's a cloudy day" would be a better example.
May
5
revised will float or floats?
added clarification from comments
May
4
comment What does “wrt” mean?
@Pacerier: I dunno, I wouldn't personally say "with regards to" - "regards" requires a different preposition, generally "in".
May
4
comment Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?
@sumelic: "Besides" implies that the following clause is in some sense in opposition to the preceding statements. "Additionally", "moreover", etc. don't carry any such sense of opposition.
May
1
comment Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?
@SjoerdC.deVries: nope, you're 100% correct. I posted an answer because I disagreed with Jay's answer.
May
1
answered Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?
May
1
comment What does “all stand” mean?
Context, please? Because I can construct all sorts of sentences where the words "all" and "stand" happen to end up next to each other. And there's also "All stand for the national anthem."
Apr
30
comment What category is an apostrophe in that a comma or a semicolon is not in?
Huh. Interesting question. Dunno if it has much of an answer, other than "punctuation used for joining words" vs. "all other punctuation", but interesting distinction.
Apr
30
comment Is there a word for homonyms across languages?
As Lucky said, design and Dasein are not homonyms: they're not spelled alike, and they don't sound alike. (Well, not unless you're pronouncing one of them completely wrong.) So what exactly are you trying to ask?