19,858 reputation
459120
bio website
location Pennsylvania
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 4 hours ago

Motto: I'd enjoy the day more if it started later.

I was born and raised in southern California, but my first language was actually Hungarian. I currently reside in eastern Pennsylvania.


Aug
18
comment What is the meaning of 'busts up a chiffarobe'?
You already have the definition of chifforobe. Better dictionaries will also tell you the definition of bust up. If those dictionary entries don't answer your question sufficiently, you need to explain why.
Aug
16
comment Connotations of “quixotic”
Oy. I feel like I deserve an upvote just for reading that all the way through, but since that's not how the world works, +1 for you instead. :)
Aug
12
revised “Behaves similar to” or “behaves similarly to”?
removed distracting subject-verb disagreement, since it's not material to the question
Aug
8
comment Why is a dead man like a plumber's candle?
@Jim: oh, come off it already!
Aug
8
comment Why is a dead man like a plumber's candle?
@Jim: so are a majority of household candles, and the majority of votive candles, and tealights, and pretty much any candle that's made primarily of paraffin (and isn't dyed). The simile in the quote is like saying something is "as green as a milk-vetch leaf in spring" - sure, a milk-vetch leaf is green in spring, but so are an awful lot of other, far more common (and commonly-known) things.
Aug
7
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
5
revised Expression for “preaching to someone who already agrees”?
Supported answer with a link & a quote
Aug
5
comment Expression for “preaching to someone who already agrees”?
"Preaching to the choir" is exactly the phrase that comes to my mind.
Aug
5
comment What is the name of the “agency” fallacy?
(Note that there are those of us who vehemently disagree with what Andrew said.)
Aug
1
comment Dishes 3 part job or not?
1. Rinsing the dishes before putting them in the dishwasher wastes water and doesn't get anything any cleaner, 2. Anyone who believes otherwise is a heretical lunatic, and 3. I think I like you, you heretical lunatic. :)
Aug
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
1
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@Kris: I don't think you quite understood the question.
Aug
1
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@Nate: I haven't used any actual profanity yet, but I might have to resort to it, because there are now FOUR IDIOTS who think this is general reference. I swear, we should make it a requirement that before you can use that close reason, you have to provide a link to a dictionary that perfectly answers the question.
Aug
1
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@talrnu, it's very, very hard to Google this topic - even NGrams mostly returns results that are actually "somebody did something for three days, dying...". However, wading through the Google Books results to find the 19th century novels that actually use the construction in question, confirms my impression from a lifetime of reading that this phrasing was simply not used in cases where the subject recovered.
Aug
1
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
@xtraorange: that's precisely what I said in the second paragraph.
Jul
31
comment What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
To the @#@$#@# who voted to close this as general reference, I challenge you to provide ANY sort of link that explains this construction. (No, a link to the dictionary definition of the word "die" or "dying" does not qualify.) I just spent the better part of an hour looking, and I found NOTHING.
Jul
31
answered What does it mean: “… was three days dying”?
Jul
31
revised Metaphors similar to “Trojan Horse”
the unnecessary definite article was bugging me
Jul
30
comment What is the difference between Seventh Heaven and Cloud Nine?
@JoeBlow: I think "Earth to cloud nine" might be a relative of "it's not rocket surgery": it's a combination of idioms (in this case, of "Earth to [insert name here]" and "he's on cloud nine") that doesn't really make sense unless you're familiar with the constituent idioms. As a result, if you're only familiar with the mashup, you're forced to assign a meaning to it based on context, and the meaning you assign might not be correct.
Jul
30
comment What is the difference between Seventh Heaven and Cloud Nine?
@JoeBlow: I've never heard that usage. In my world, "cloud nine" is indeed a synonym of "seventh heaven". If someone is off in daydream-land, the usual phrase is "Earth to [insert name here]".