19,967 reputation
459121
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location Pennsylvania
age 42
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen yesterday

Motto: I'd enjoy the day more if it started later.

I was born and raised in southern California, but my first language was actually Hungarian. I currently reside in eastern Pennsylvania.


1d
comment Why are Leicester & co pronounced as they are?
Actually, these are evidence that the spelling predates the pronunciation. I.e. when the spelling of these placenames became fossilized, they were pronounced with many more syllables than people give them nowadays.
1d
answered Has there ever been a word for someone who has a thousand pounds?
Sep
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
5
comment Other words to describe the relationships between pieces of data with a common parent/child
I can't reconcile your use of arrows with your statement that the relationships aren't hierarchical. I get that you're probably being deliberately vague about the precise nature of the data, but without further contextual details, I'm afraid we're all taking stabs in the dark.
Sep
4
comment Sieve vs filter? Are they opposites?
@guest: oh, I'm fully aware that it can be used as a verb, but I, personally, have never used it so. There's a bit of chicken-and-egg, but it sounds awkward to me as a verb.
Sep
4
comment Sieve vs filter? Are they opposites?
I don't think I've ever used "sieve" as a verb. "Filter" is what I would use for ending up with a list of primes; "filter out" might result in a list of numbers that aren't primes, but it might give the same results as "filter". Bottom line is, English ain't math, more's the pity.
Sep
4
comment I hardly/highly doubt it
@mplungjan, no it's not at all like "could/couldn't care less". Both "hardly doubt" and "highly doubt" are grammatically AND semantically correct; they just happen to mean opposite things. "Could care less" is OK grammatically, but not semantically; nevertheless, for some people it's idiomatic. All of "couldn't care less", "hardly doubt", and "highly doubt" are idiomatic in standard English, but none of them are idioms.
Sep
4
comment How do you Spell: Smused? Smoosed?
... though it looks like Merriam-Webster lists a transitive usage for it, too, but that sounds Totally Wrong to my ear.
Sep
4
comment How do you Spell: Smused? Smoosed?
Note that "schmooze" is intransitive: the usage is "Bill schmoozed with the clients, warming them up for the spiel from marketing."
Sep
3
comment Is there a phrase or idiom for “being defeated by future problems”?
Hmm, premature optimization taken to the extreme?
Sep
2
comment Neutral alternative to “deny” to mean “assert the untruth [of a claim]”
Also, the "continued to contradict the claim" wording merely shifts the weaseliness: now instead of Smith's truthfulness being in doubt, we're implying that the accusation might be false.
Sep
2
comment Neutral alternative to “deny” to mean “assert the untruth [of a claim]”
THWACK!!! to the lot of you. Harumph.
Aug
18
comment What is the meaning of 'busts up a chiffarobe'?
You already have the definition of chifforobe. Better dictionaries will also tell you the definition of bust up. If those dictionary entries don't answer your question sufficiently, you need to explain why.
Aug
16
comment Connotations of “quixotic”
Oy. I feel like I deserve an upvote just for reading that all the way through, but since that's not how the world works, +1 for you instead. :)
Aug
12
revised “Behaves similar to” or “behaves similarly to”?
removed distracting subject-verb disagreement, since it's not material to the question
Aug
8
comment Why is a dead man like a plumber's candle?
@Jim: oh, come off it already!
Aug
8
comment Why is a dead man like a plumber's candle?
@Jim: so are a majority of household candles, and the majority of votive candles, and tealights, and pretty much any candle that's made primarily of paraffin (and isn't dyed). The simile in the quote is like saying something is "as green as a milk-vetch leaf in spring" - sure, a milk-vetch leaf is green in spring, but so are an awful lot of other, far more common (and commonly-known) things.
Aug
7
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
5
revised Expression for “preaching to someone who already agrees”?
Supported answer with a link & a quote
Aug
5
comment Expression for “preaching to someone who already agrees”?
"Preaching to the choir" is exactly the phrase that comes to my mind.