621 reputation
311
bio website orthogonaltonormal.com
location Johnstown, PA
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago
//TODO Glorious Lies

Mar
6
comment Word or term for an argument that is inherently true
@KitFox Clearly not a golfer...
Dec
3
answered What do you call a person who keeps on going despite setbacks? (in one word, a noun)
Nov
30
awarded  Yearling
Nov
5
answered A word for blowing air into baby's tummy to make him(her) laugh
Oct
21
comment A person who shares or likes or retweets everything they come across?
@bib I'm partial to Twidiot/Twitiot
Sep
23
comment Do synonyms exactly stand for the same
@Michael Your comment is only relevant if English doesn't have any deadwood in it?
Aug
1
comment The difference between Cool and Cold
of course comfort levels are very relative, so both Makky and his friend could have been right: cupola.com/html/wordplay/thermo1.htm (slightly exaggerated)
Aug
1
answered Do we have an equivalent for Persian's proverb “to stretch one's leg more than one's rug”?
Jul
22
comment “All roads lead to Rome”
hmmm, I grew up and live in in the western half of the state. Until fairly recently Pittsburgh was an airline hub; which might have had something to do with keeping the phrase at bay.
Jul
22
comment “All roads lead to Rome”
Southeastern quarter? I've never heard that phrase in Pennsylvania.
Jun
26
comment Is the use of the quotation marks necessary with expressions like “self-proclaimed”, “self-styled”, “so-called” and “would be”?
Repetition emphasizes a point through redundancy.
Jun
24
comment What does it mean to be “mortally wounded”?
@tchrist I've heard the phrase "mortal illness" before. The medical world uses Mortality and Morbidity Reports to track diseases/etc. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morbidity_and_Mortality_Weekly_Report
Jun
12
comment Is there a better way to write 'do-it-yourselfer'?
I suppose American and British vs Canadian makes an interesting change from the standard American vs British comment threads...
Jun
12
comment Is there a better way to write 'do-it-yourselfer'?
I'm saying I'd normally only use it to describe people who're hiring out; not someone who just does his own stuff at home and occasionally helps a friend for a few beers.
Jun
12
comment Is there a better way to write 'do-it-yourselfer'?
I'd normally use Handyman to refer to the person you hire to do small jobs because you're not a DIYer.
Apr
11
comment Is the construction, “He is a great player, is Tendulkar” grammatical?
@BarrieEngland I'm not sure I understand what you're asking, but I found all of the tail examples in your answer (linked to in the question comments) jarring to the point that in isolation my first reaction would probably be "bad translation?"; while they seemed a bit odd I didn't a strong negative reaction to the inversion examples I saw when looking the term up in Wikipedia.
Apr
11
comment Is the construction, “He is a great player, is Tendulkar” grammatical?
Is that construct a UK thing? I don't recall ever hearing it in the US.
Mar
18
comment What do you call a disease with an unknown cure?
@rhetorician not all incurable diseases can/will kill you.
Mar
15
comment “The more chickens in a farm the more crap and the fewer eggs”
@xr09 Gendered terms are hen/pullet for a female, and rooster/cock for the male. The latter usage of cock is relatively uncommon.
Feb
25
comment Meaning of “cry creek” and “cock of the game”
16th century English is different enough in terms of idioms, etc that it becomes somewhat difficult for colloquial modern English speakers, so there's no need to apologize when asking about it. 17th century English is also bit challenging; following the main plotline in Shakespeare isn't that hard but you'll probably miss most of the low humor he included without an annotated copy. In the other direction, by the time you get to 14th century English (ex Chaucer) an annotated (or translated) copy of the text is virtually obligatory because it's edging into a different language entirely.