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seen May 19 at 18:07

May
13
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
10
accepted An easy way to differentiate between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac?
Mar
8
comment An easy way to differentiate between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac?
@Oldcat I meant that I am looking for a book-ish answer. The real-world answer for this question would be too short-signted, i.e. an encyclopaedia (or Wikipedia). I don't understand why you took offense from that statement in the question.
Mar
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
7
comment An easy way to differentiate between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac?
Question was originally posted on ell.SE but cross-posted here because I am after a more in-depth/authoritative answer.
Mar
7
asked An easy way to differentiate between Compendium, Encyclopaedia, and Almanac?
Oct
2
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
17
accepted Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM
Mar
10
awarded  Critic
Mar
10
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
10
comment Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM
Relevant link: Give 'em Hell, Harry! (Wikipedia)
Mar
10
comment Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM
@J.R. And in your case, you use lowercase for all two-letter words? (How about three-letter words like the, put, etc. What's the... 'er... formula? How do you do it?)
Mar
10
comment Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM
@Kris If only you read the second comment under the question.
Mar
10
asked Appropriate title case: 'em or 'Em or 'EM
Aug
30
comment Why is the “round figure” of a person associated with being “comforting”?
If only the down voters would say why, duh! (I am not new to SE, and have been doing well on other SE sites.)
Aug
30
accepted Why is the “round figure” of a person associated with being “comforting”?
Aug
30
comment adjective & verb form of “fidelity”
Fide (v.) and Fidelitous (Adj.) says my teacher too.
Aug
30
revised Why is the “round figure” of a person associated with being “comforting”?
edited tags
Aug
30
awarded  Commentator
Aug
30
comment Is on/before 15 July better than by 15 July if I want to be precise and unambiguous? Which is the more common form?
Which is the more common form? What I've seen in many applications is like "register by September 15, 2012".