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4h
comment Compounds and Phrases - differences
Yup, probly. Sorry about that.
4h
comment Plural or singular verb: is /are- What to choose? Why to choose it?
One question at a time, please.
4h
comment Do I use is/are with measurements and time?
If it's contracted (which it almost always is in speech), there's works for singular and plural. If you insist on spelling out the auxiliary verb, then you have to inflect it for singular or plural. Your choice.
6h
comment Words to describe a person who is arrogant
This very question has recently received an intensive linguistic analysis by the linguist Geoffrey Nunberg. The answer can be found here.
6h
comment got ready vs is ready
Because it is ready now. Ready is a state, and get ready means an activity leading to being ready. That comes before be ready. Like your friend said, it got processed (past) and now it is ready (present).
9h
comment infinitive after say
No, no, no. Wrong. Some object infinitive complement clauses have the same subject as the main verb; these are called A-Equi predicates. They're far from the only kind, however; there are lots of other kinds of predicate, and lots of other possibilities. For instance, consider the difference between He promised Mary to take out the trash and He asked Mary to take out the trash. Obviously the book you refer to is a school textbook and not a real grammar of English. Textbook writers will say anything.
10h
comment SAT ACT online website
If you want to hire a business consultant, there are many available; free business advice is worth what you pay for it.
10h
comment “If you want, I can do this ”vs “I can do this, if you want” which one is correct?
Nevertheless, the question is incorrect, because it presupposes that, of two variants of an English sentence, only one can be correct. This is total nonsense, and no part of English grammar.
12h
revised verb +ed or to be + verb +ed
edited body
12h
comment verb +ed or to be + verb +ed
These deletions are done by three different syntactic rules: (1) is To be-Deletion, (2) is Complementizer that-Deletion, and (3) is Whiz-Deletion. (4) is an unsuccesful application of Whiz-Deletion. Each rule has its own set of affordances and prohibitions, and each is optional. There is no special name for this kind of grammar; it's just normal English syntax.
12h
comment verb +ed or to be + verb +ed
Here's the explanation: sentence 1 has an infinitive complement found the door (to be) locked; the to be part is deleted, as it often is. Sentence 2 has a tensed complement found (that) the door was locked; the that part is deleted, as it often is. Both are grammatical, and mean the same thing. Sentence 3 has a non-restrictive relative clause modifying loop -- (which is) sometimes called; the which is part is deleted, as it often is. Sentence 4 is simply ungrammatical, because Whiz-deletion deletes the wh-word and the is; if you leave is, you need which, too.
12h
revised verb +ed or to be + verb +ed
added 14 characters in body
13h
comment We went to Atlanta in “summer vacation.”
@EdwinAshworth: Realist.
13h
comment What is the object of this sentence?
I.e, you and your girlfriend must be American. It's not your fault you were never taught English grammar; it's slipped off the Anglophone curriculum over the last century and now Americans are taught a catechism of "correctness" instead of the facts, and never study it further. But trying to parse and identify structures in random sentences is in fact complicated stuff; it's like doing engineering knowing only 5th-grade arithmetic. Naturally there are problems.
14h
comment We went to Atlanta in “summer vacation.”
@What: It's likely not their question; I would bet it comes from an "English grammar" textbook. Most are not written by native speakers, and very few use grammatical terminology correctly.
14h
comment Dissecting Bad Grammar
It's an attachment ambiguity. Probly needs commas around the parenthetical where appropriate; that links up the VPs can act as a sandbox and to allow you to evaluate and identifies the second one as a purpose infinitive modifying sandbox, not appropriate, which wouldn't work.
14h
comment We went to Atlanta in “summer vacation.”
@FF: probly some people think "collective noun" means "compound noun". Close enough for English class.
14h
comment Is there a word that describes an intelligent, self-aware, sentient lifeform?
Since we only know of one such species, it's kind of hard to decide what you're looking for. There is no "scientific way", because it's entirely hypothetical, and without data there is no science. "Intelligent lifeform" will work as well as anything, but it begs at least two questions: (a) what does intelligent mean (outside the context of H. sapiens)? (b) what does lifeform mean (outside the context of our biome on Earth)? Both have no answers.
14h
comment A neutral word to describe ones ability to bypass social expectations in interpersonal interactions?
I am informed by my students that the noun Hard-Ass (aka hardass, hard-ass, and hard ass) describes a person who follows their own path in society, regardless of consequences, customs, or expectations. It's pretty neutral, in that it's a compliment (at least among my students) but it's made up of pejorative parts.
14h
comment Do we have any other words in collection similar to your and you are?
English has thousands of pairs of homophones, some of which are contractions like you're. This is off-topic, I suspect. A homonym dictionary will do the job, although there are many contractions that won't get listed in any dictionary.