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comment Discontinuous noun phrase and apposition involving object complements
The first one is an example of a rule or construction called (p. 25 in this list) "Extraposition From NP", or (as in this article) "Relative Clause Extraposition". It doesn't occur with appositives, only with restrictive relative clauses.
5h
comment What's the opposite of reckless?
I rather like reckful.
1d
comment a word that contains every vowel contigiously
All the English vowels in one word? Impossible. There are thirteen of them, at least, and more in other dialects. The link points to American English pronunciation, as in Kenyon & Knott.
1d
comment “Any” or “some” in indirect questions
More information is available at english.stackexchange.com/q/63618/15299, including a reference to Robin Lakoff's famous paper "Some reasons why there can't be any some/any rule", which discusses this question in great detail.
1d
comment 'and what are the (…)'
Especially when concatenated with two other wh-clauses, the subject-auxiliary inversion in the last clause is simply ungrammatical. Wh-clauses (aka embedded questions or headless relatives) are formed like questions except that they don't invert subject and first auxiliary like questions do. The last clause should be what their major points of access ... are.
2d
answered the use of rob with cars
2d
comment How exactly was the long S used and why did people stop using it?
In the OED the use of long s in quotations cuts off very sharply around 1800. The vast majority of OED quotations come after that date.
Apr
25
comment English for “ayudante de cátedra”
A Teacher's Assistant is an assistant to a primary or secondary teacher; it's a permanent job. A Teaching Assistant/TA (or Graduate Student Instructor/GSI at some schools), by contrast, is a temporary job taken by a graduate student to earn money, pay tuition, and gain experience as a teacher of the discipline they're studying. One or more TAs get assigned to most large classes in big universities; that's one reason there are so many English grad students -- they teach freshman comp.
Apr
25
awarded  usage
Apr
24
comment Articles in English--what for and the history
Yes, Slavonic languages have inflections that fill the same purpose filled in English by the little words -- articles, prepositions, complementizers, particles, auxiliaries, etc. Word order in English is far more important than it is in Slavonic languages because of that -- English has to use word order and auxiliary words to form a construction where Russian or Serbian would just use a different case form or a diminutive form or a completive form. English doesn't have those forms available any more. Unfortunately, English constructions are syntagmatic, whereas inflections are paradigmatic.
Apr
24
comment Present Perfect Tense - Determine usage case
They're not my usages; they're McCawley's. And they have other differences, too, which are discussed in the original paper.
Apr
24
comment Present Perfect Tense - Determine usage case
There are actually four, not just two, and many sentences don't contain enough information to distinguish which one is intended.
Apr
24
answered Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?
Apr
24
comment Articles in English--what for and the history
What is your native language? There may be some analogous phenomenon in it that serves some of the same purposes. Articles are just machinery, and their use is almost always idiomatic. There is no single rule that covers articles; instead there are hundreds, all specific to certain kinds of construction.
Apr
24
revised “Without that” clause
edited body
Apr
24
revised “Without that” clause
edited body
Apr
23
revised Having a hard time analyzing the grammatical structure of this sentence
added 1 character in body
Apr
21
comment Phrasal verbs with take
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is homework. Consult your teacher.
Apr
19
revised The Relationship Between Style Analysis, Tone, and Voice in Analyzing Writing
added 4 characters in body
Apr
19
revised “Unless” in implication
added 81 characters in body