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12h
revised Must present perfect tense be used if the action takes place more than once?
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14h
comment Are graphic novels considered literature?
Yes, certainly as much as ungraphic novels. That is, it varies; some are, some aren't.
15h
comment Can we use the preposition “for” in this manner?
This is the for infinitive subject marker that goes with the to infinitive verb marker (which is why it's technically called "the for..to complementizer"). The subject of an infinitive is objective (me, her, him, us, them) and in this case retains the for to mark it. Note that this whole infinitive clause is a purpose clause, and therefore may be fronted if desired: For her to have taken so many clothes off, it must really be hot in here.
21h
comment I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit?
The difference is not in the meaning but in the metaphor. A bit is count/unitary/digital/integer, slightly is mass/continuous/analog/real number. One has volume, but only in countable bits and pieces, the other has continously variable volume (or area, or length, or voltage, or any other dimension), with only arbitrary divisions.
21h
comment I don't understand the difference between slightly and a bit?
Oh, you could say even that way, provided you gave it the right intonation; it would probly sound better as to even be slightly older, or even proved to be slightly older, better yet. The focus of even is really the whole VP 'proved to be slightly older' -- that's the extreme, surprising phenomenon that even is commenting on -- so right before that VP is its natural slot, though it can be floated, like many operators, to other positions in the clause.
1d
comment Use of “play” followed by an adjective
"Semantic bleaching" is what is said to happen to verbs in the process of turning into auxiliaries; the process can take centuries.
1d
revised Is the grammar proper for this statement going on the back of a tee shirt for a labor day celebration
edited title
1d
comment Is the grammar proper for this statement going on the back of a tee shirt for a labor day celebration
Agreed. A much shorter slogan. You want people to read it on somebody's stomach or back, which are not ideal display formats. So make it easy for them. If you got lots to say, design several hundred shirts, each with a different motto. But short. (oh, and there are no grammar mistakes; gold star)
1d
revised Correct use of “rid of”
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1d
revised Is 'what' both relative adjective and relative pronoun?
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1d
comment Is 'what' both relative adjective and relative pronoun?
Note Afterthought above.
1d
revised Antecedents of indefinite pronouns
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1d
revised A word to refer to both physical objects and conceptual ideas
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1d
revised What is the opposite of 'subjunctive'?
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1d
comment Clauses in Sentences
You get that simultaneous reading with transfer verbs, like She told me to empty the garbage, where me is simultaneously the indirect object of tell (in one event, in one clause) and the subject of the infinitive clause (for) me to take out the garbage, in another event, in another clause. But tell governs B-Equi; let governs B-Raising.
1d
comment Clauses in Sentences
The reason it's incorrect grammar is that the object of let is not my daughter, but (for) my daughter (to) listen to the music, an infinitive clause (with the for..to deleted, a special feature of let). What you call the "object" is just the subject of what you call "the phrase", which is an infinitive verb phrase, and the whole clause, subject and infinitive verb phrase, is the direct object of let. It just looks like his daughter is also the object of let, but it isn't -- it's just in the same place an object would be.
2d
comment Clauses in Sentences
*He let his daughter is ungrammatical English. In the sentence you present He let his daughter listen to the music, there are two clauses. One clause has let as the main verb, and the other clause has listen as the main verb. The second clause is the object of let. The problem is that his daughter is in just the right place to be the subject of listen and als the indirect object of let. So it could be either Equi or Raising. But Let there be dancing in the streets suggests that it's B-Raising instead of B-Equi.
2d
comment is this correct to say “John is calling you within next 2 minutes”
And, no, it's not correct to say that. But not for the reason you think.
2d
comment Analyzing 'as' in ascertain, assure, etc
The stereotypic and self-demonstrating example of assimilation; assimilate comes from ad 'toward' + simil 'similar' and the word is produced by assimilating ad- to simil, so there is a double S, which was probly pronounced as a long /s/ in Latin.
2d
comment Grammatical name/function of “what” in the following sentence
Well, it's an imperative, so it's missing a subject. And embedded question complements don't diagram well, I'm afraid. Sentence diagramming really only works for short sentences without subordinate clauses; the kind you see in first and second grade and never again after that, except in grammar class.