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7h
comment What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?
So you're reading it as an on home constituent, as in come on home, take them on home with you, get on home now, etc? Could be both -- there are often alternative parses that don't affect meaning.
11h
revised Usage of can vs may
added 8 characters in body
11h
comment Usage of can vs may
Not much difference between those two; either could be used in almost any circumstances with the same sense. But all modal verbs have several senses and peculiar syntax, and the usages of can and may are very different.
12h
comment Correct preposition to follow “ineptitude”?
at with a gerund or activity name; in with activity name.
12h
comment What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?
It's a standard phrasal verb, which always have a verbal part (in this case bring) and a particle (on). They must be distinguished between verb + preposition constructions because they follow different syntax rules. Why do you suppose *Bring on them! is ungrammatical while Bring them on! is normal? While Sit on them! is grammatical, but *Sit them on! isn't?
12h
comment What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?
It's the particle in the phrasal verb bring on (brting on the clowns; brting the clowns on; bring them on; they were brought on;). Some linguists use the phrase "intransitive preposition", which some people like, but it's confusing to others.
12h
comment Request for a scholarly reference for the correct usage of the English indefinite article (a/an).
I would recommend starting with McCawley; the first three chapters -- where he explains what he's talking about and how he's going to describe it -- are online from Google Books, so you can see what it's like.
12h
comment Request for a scholarly reference for the correct usage of the English indefinite article (a/an).
There are two definitive grammars of modern English, and many lesser ones. The two big ones are the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language by Huddleston and Pullum, which runs about 1500 pages and requires two hands. The other is McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English, which is less than a thousand pages and has a paperback edition. Neither is light going. We're talking college textbooks.
13h
comment Request for a scholarly reference for the correct usage of the English indefinite article (a/an).
Yes, but it's not just a matter of listing words. English grammar is all structures and it's all about speech, not writing. Generally those who grow up in Anglophone educational systems are totally ignorant of even basic facts about English (like how definite and indefinite articles work), even when they always use them correctly; it's rather like starting calculus without doing arithmetic and algebra first. So studying a couple hundred syntactic rules is more likely to confuse than enlighten.
13h
comment Request for a scholarly reference for the correct usage of the English indefinite article (a/an).
@O.M.Y: No, there is no such source, and since there is no unified teacher training, there is no unified authoritative source. As for the Somebody, multiply by hundreds of thousands of individual interpretations, all contradictory, all passed on dutifully to generations to come. Read a few answers here and you'll see. There are some sources that simply present facts, but mostly you'll see hypotheses raised to a degree of certitude normally reserved for theology
14h
answered Usage of the word 'have'
16h
revised Usage of the word 'have'
added 2 characters in body
1d
comment What is “irregular rhyme?”
First they lay down the rules, then they pronounce anything that doesn't fit them to be "irregular". You're lucky it isn't called "false rhyme".
1d
comment How many phonemes are in the word “queen”?
Or quick /kwɪk/, with the same initial cluster. /kw/ is a consonant cluster in English, not a phoneme the way /kʷ/ is in Latin or Skagit. Of course, since the lips and the tongue are independent articulators, the velar /k/ part and the labial /w/ part can overlap in either direction, so [kʷ] is entirely possible and probly quite common in some people's speech.
1d
comment Is there an antonym for “pejorative”?
Etymologically, pejorative comes from Latin peior 'worse'. Its opposite is melior 'better'. So an antonym could be meliorative, with or without an initial a-.
1d
comment What do the pronouns indicate?
Ah, I see I omitted the pro-verb do so; technically, it's not a pronoun, though it follows the same anaphoric rules as pronouns. Do so and do it are both pro-verbs that differ in their scope; you can say Harry vomited in the toilet and Max did it into the sink, because do it can refer to just a verb, but you can't say *Harry vomited in the toilet and Max did so into the sink because do so refers to a verb phrase, not just to a verb that's part of a verb phrase, like do it does. There's a famous paper by Lakoff and Ross called "Why you can't do so into the sink."
2d
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
Take your pick means 'You may have either one'. I.e, they're both correct, and the choice is an esthetic one for you. So exercise your esthetic sensibilities and pick the one you prefer.
2d
comment Can a pronoun and its referent have different plurality?
Your family is still in Bosnia, aren't they? vs Your family is still in Bosnia, isn't it? Take your pick.
2d
comment Use of semicolon between dependent clause and compound subject
No. A semicolon is a full stop and can only go after a complete sentence, not a subordinate clause.
2d
comment Unable to pronounce 'sh'
There is no special term; it's simply interference from one's native language. To make an [ʃ] sound, as in passion ['pæʃən], say an [s] and, while saying it, slide the tongue back along the roof of the mouth. Eventually you will reach the place where [ʃ] is articulated. That is all.