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May
16
comment Upstairs/downstairs neighbors
Most people I know who live in apartment buildings just refer to the other people in the same building as "neighbors". The larger the building, the more likely "neighbors" will refer exclusively to same-building residents.
May
16
comment Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
@Greg I don't really get the "manipulative" sense you do from the title at all, or why you feel it "pins down the listener". I'm pretty sure that (as I said in my answer) that is the title because it is an expression that can sound childish, and the person experiencing heaven in the story is a four-year-old boy.
May
16
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May
16
comment Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
@Frank, that's a great and much simpler illustration of what I was trying to say! Thanks.
May
16
answered Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
May
15
comment Pronunciation of council/counsellor
You can call it anything you want, really - IPA symbols are just notation, and get used in different conventional ways by different people. The IPA has a diacritic for fronting, a + under the character, so perhaps you could write the diphthong as [a̟ʊ] to show that it's slightly fronted.
May
15
answered Pronunciation of council/counsellor
Apr
22
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Apr
5
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Dec
13
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Dec
11
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Nov
25
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Oct
23
comment Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
I'm sure she has mastered them in spoken production/perception, but the fact that the nasal in the cluster isn't psychologically prominent might still be making her leave it out in spelling, no?
Oct
22
comment Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
Does she leave out <n> when spelling words like "money", though? My impression was that she leaves it out when it's adjacent to another consonant, which is not the environment for Money-smoothing.
Oct
22
answered Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
Sep
30
answered Calque pairs like 'praeternatural/metaphysical'
Aug
17
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Jun
7
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May
20
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Apr
3
comment What is the English counterpart to the Japanese ‘Insei’ – rule by a retired emperor/leader?
As for the actual question, it seems to me that this is a case where no concise expression exists in English, and we should just borrow the Japanese insei.