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location Minnesota
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Mar 24 at 1:59

American English speaker; also likes linguistics.se.


Feb
11
comment single word for 'Hospital' and 'Clinic'
"Medical center" is by far the most common phrase I hear used for this (American English speaker) - it sounds more natural than "medical facility" to me.
Feb
3
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
30
comment What is the pronunciation of “the”?
@Mechanicalsnail is right - some people always use [ðə], and insert a glottal stop if the following word start with a vowel. Such speakers only use [ði] for emphasis.
Dec
30
comment What do you call a USB flash disk?
I've also heard "jump drive," and I commonly hear "thumb drive" but NEVER "thumbnail drive."
Dec
27
comment Do they call this *it* expletive?
@Mitch - "expletive" in this sense is accepted linguistic terminology (ling.upenn.edu/~beatrice/syntax-textbook/box-expletives.html) - no need to change it.
Dec
9
comment Why “the” in “Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog)”?
This is by far the best answer so far. You could imagine the title as "Three Men in a Boat, to say nothing of the Dog [who was also in the boat]" - the first part of the title having introduced the context, there is a specific dog that goes in that context.
Nov
25
awarded  Yearling
Nov
24
comment Why is there no consistency in the plural forms of words ending on an “f” (e.g. safe, roof, dwarf, etc.)?
@FumbleFingers, I think "pooves" might not be a great example because the singular can also be "poove": thefreedictionary.com/poove
Nov
24
comment Active usage of “taken aback”
Thanks for the references. I like @PeterShor's Ngram - that is pretty good evidence (that I somehow didn't think to look for when composing my question) that the passive version really is way more common. I'd love to see that posted in an answer not a comment.
Nov
24
asked Active usage of “taken aback”
Nov
18
comment How do you refer to a hyponym that is the same word as the hypernym?
Austen calls them the "Miss Bennets" 7 times, never the "Misses Bennet", as you can find out by doing a text search here: gutenberg.org/files/1342/1342-h/1342-h.htm
Nov
10
comment “Overseas” vs. “abroad”
@PeterShor - does Mexico not exist?
Oct
29
comment Native English inferiority
I'm not saying this to plug my own answer, I'm just genuinely puzzled: why was this considered not a real question? The question can certainly be improved, but I was able to identify what OP was asking for and answer it, so...
Oct
28
answered Native English inferiority
Oct
28
comment Native English inferiority
I think this has the potential to be a very good question if it is changed to be less about "inferiority" and more focused on the linguistic phenomenon of languages having etymologically distinct classes of vocabulary that speakers are sensitive to. It also might be a better fit for linguistics.se, since OP asks for cross-linguistic examples.
Oct
22
revised Five percent VS The five percent
fixed italicization
Oct
22
answered Solution of/to/for equation
Oct
11
comment Friendlier way to express you paid for a person's drink/dinner and expect it to be paid back
+1, "cover" is most likely what I would say (US English speaker).
Oct
11
comment Friendlier way to express you paid for a person's drink/dinner and expect it to be paid back
@Martin - I disagree too. I actually think I'd be more likely to say "spotted" than "loaned" or "lent". There's a very specific reason: loaned/lent, to me, would imply that my friend physically gave me cash with which I then paid; whereas in this case no money changed hands between us, because my friend paid for my drink.
Oct
10
comment Is there a term for referencing the main character in a first-person song?
the... singer?