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location Minnesota
age 23
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American English speaker; also likes linguistics.se.


Dec
11
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
25
awarded  Yearling
Oct
23
comment Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
I'm sure she has mastered them in spoken production/perception, but the fact that the nasal in the cluster isn't psychologically prominent might still be making her leave it out in spelling, no?
Oct
22
comment Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
Does she leave out <n> when spelling words like "money", though? My impression was that she leaves it out when it's adjacent to another consonant, which is not the environment for Money-smoothing.
Oct
22
answered Is final /n/ sound reduced / nasalized in American English?
Sep
30
answered Calque pairs like 'praeternatural/metaphysical'
Aug
17
awarded  Popular Question
Jun
7
awarded  Popular Question
May
20
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
3
comment What is the English counterpart to the Japanese ‘Insei’ – rule by a retired emperor/leader?
As for the actual question, it seems to me that this is a case where no concise expression exists in English, and we should just borrow the Japanese insei.
Apr
3
comment What is the English counterpart to the Japanese ‘Insei’ – rule by a retired emperor/leader?
This doesn't really help come up with a word, but perhaps there was a Russian insei in the form of Putin while Medvedev was president from 2008-2012?
Mar
13
comment Is this grammatically correct?
I assume the downvoter downvoted because your answer is basically saying it's incorrect to narrate something in present tense, which lots of books, stories, etc do all the time.
Mar
1
comment Why don't “-use” verb-noun pairs obey initial stress derivation?
Hmm - it seems more likely to be etymological to me, since we don't see the same thing with "produce", and -uce = -use phonologically. But could be either way, I suppose.
Feb
27
comment Why don't “-use” verb-noun pairs obey initial stress derivation?
that is the exact opposite of what I said happens - all of the "use" verbs have stress on the second syllable all of the time.
Feb
27
asked Why don't “-use” verb-noun pairs obey initial stress derivation?
Feb
25
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
12
comment Pronunciation of '-ing' endings as '-een'
It also feels to me, though my intuition could be off, like it probably correlates with the "mondee tuesdee" pronunciation, about which see my old question.
Feb
12
comment Pronunciation of '-ing' endings as '-een'
I've wondered about this too! Great question. I think it may be part of a more general process among certain speakers that "reduces" /ɪ/ (and possibly other unstressed vowels) to [i] - which is weird, considering that the usual tendency in English is the opposite, laxing unstressed things. I don't have any citations to back this up, but anecdotally (living in the Midwestern US), people who say "een" may also say things like ['gɑɹbidʒ] for garbage.
Feb
11
comment single word for 'Hospital' and 'Clinic'
"Medical center" is by far the most common phrase I hear used for this (American English speaker) - it sounds more natural than "medical facility" to me.
Feb
3
awarded  Popular Question