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21225
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location Minnesota
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 16 hours ago

American English speaker; also likes linguistics.se.


Aug
18
awarded  Guru
Jul
6
comment Plural of Friday 13th?
@VivdD - that's a really good question! I would also use "Tuesday the 25ths", because I feel like all "[day of week] the [Xth]" effectively function like single-word names for the days. I pointed out that "Friday the 13th" is a common set phrase because I think that makes the argument for putting -s at the end even stronger in this case than in the general case.
Jul
6
comment What's a good replacement to “cookbook” as referring to general-purpose manual-like computer books?
I've never heard handy-book. But handbook (single word) seems like a great answer to this question!
Jul
6
answered Plural of Friday 13th?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
20
awarded  Famous Question
Jun
6
awarded  Famous Question
May
22
comment Shoot and intentionally miss
I think this is the best general answer for "intentionally missing with a gun," but it would not work in the context OP requested (i.e. deceptively disobeying orders to kill the prisoner), because one generally hears "warning shot" as an official command ('Lieutenant, fire a warning shot across their bow!')
May
21
comment Is there a single word for “The excitement and enthusiasm at the beginning of a new job/romance” etc.?
+1. In my experience, "honeymoon period" strongly implies that this phase will be followed by some degree of disillusionment/disappointment.
May
20
awarded  Good Answer
May
17
comment “Maths” for “Mathematics”; where does the S come from?
<ths> is definitely not easier to say aloud - consonant clusters are almost never "easier" (less marked, to use the linguistic term) than single consonants. So if phonology/phonotactics are a factor, you'd expect them to be in favor of math, not maths. And I also can't think of any analogous term that keeps the <s> in abbreviation. Great question!
May
16
comment Upstairs/downstairs neighbors
Most people I know who live in apartment buildings just refer to the other people in the same building as "neighbors". The larger the building, the more likely "neighbors" will refer exclusively to same-building residents.
May
16
comment Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
@Greg I don't really get the "manipulative" sense you do from the title at all, or why you feel it "pins down the listener". I'm pretty sure that (as I said in my answer) that is the title because it is an expression that can sound childish, and the person experiencing heaven in the story is a four-year-old boy.
May
16
awarded  Nice Answer
May
16
comment Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
@Frank, that's a great and much simpler illustration of what I was trying to say! Thanks.
May
16
answered Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”
May
15
comment Pronunciation of council/counsellor
You can call it anything you want, really - IPA symbols are just notation, and get used in different conventional ways by different people. The IPA has a diacritic for fronting, a + under the character, so perhaps you could write the diphthong as [a̟ʊ] to show that it's slightly fronted.
May
15
answered Pronunciation of council/counsellor
Apr
22
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
5
awarded  Nice Answer