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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 19 votes cast
Jan
27
comment optimum answer to do you often
""How often" and "Do you often" are equal in nature." Incorrect. 'How often' - 6 times a week. 'Do you often'. No/Yes. I don't think there's any more to say about this one.
Jan
27
comment optimum answer to do you often
Note: your second question: 'how often' was not asked at all, which is why an answer to it is superfluous/incorrect when choosing the 'best' answer.
Jan
27
comment optimum answer to do you often
You're missing the point (for the record, I didn't downvote you!). Answering a question that wasn't asked is not part of forming the 'best answer' to a question.
Jan
27
comment optimum answer to do you often
The point is, a more specific figure is not actually being asked for. The questioner is merely asking whether the respondee thinks they have visitors often. There is nothing about the 'rate' of visitors being asked.
Jan
27
comment optimum answer to do you often
To what degree the questioner receives visitors is not the question. The question is, "do you have visitors 'often'?". This depends on what you mean by 'often'. 'Pretty much every day' would not be often at all for something like a museum. Response b) is the only one that answered the question, even though all three answers would be fine from a non-technical standpoint.
Jan
27
answered optimum answer to do you often
Jan
27
comment “Lying supine” vs. “supine”
@StanShunpike: yes you hear 'pronated' and 'supinated' a lot with feet and runners: I'm not sure how this is derived, but am assuming it's reflective of the anatomical position that's exaggerated eg. 'over'-pronated.
Jan
27
comment “Lying supine” vs. “supine”
@medica: yes that is more accurate. Informally, 'move to prone position' sounds like something the therapist does to the patient, compared to 'pain on pronation' or 'pronate the arm' sounds like something the patient does (or attempts).
Jan
27
comment “Lying supine” vs. “supine”
It is a bit odd isn't it? While 'forearm in prone position' is used a bit, I must admit I've never heard someone describe a forearm as 'supine'. It's advisable to stick to the strictly defined anatomical terms (ventral/dorsal). 'Rostral' is another one: cute, rarely used, but defined as 'beak' or 'nose' forward!
Jan
27
comment A word to describe not caring (socially and publically) about other people's feelings
'Oblivious' means you missed the reactions or feelings of others, there's nothing necessarily intentional about it. Had you picked up on someone's reactions for example, you may well have cared about them.
Jan
27
comment “Lying supine” vs. “supine”
@StanShunpike: no, the terms aren't limited to laying down (medically anyway) eg. the forearm can be in a prone position, although for non-forearms, you would generally say ventral or dorsal. Prone for the forearm is quite common though.
Jan
27
answered A word to describe not caring (socially and publically) about other people's feelings
Jan
27
answered “Lying supine” vs. “supine”
Sep
12
comment What is the word for a man who keeps returning for other people to abuse him?
Yes, you're right Joseph Neathawk: the OP looks like he might be getting something out of it.
Jul
20
comment What is the word for a man who keeps returning for other people to abuse him?
'Glutton for punishment' doesn't imply he enjoys it or gets something out of it. You can be a glutton for punishment, and hate doing what you're doing because for example, you're trying to get ahead in a job. You still do it, not because you like the treatment you get, but because you've got your eye on a bigger prize. The OP's example refers to someone with a pathology, which is why 'masochist' works better.
Jul
20
answered Tenses in the sentence
Jul
20
comment What do you call someone who always puts blame on others?
'Punitive' means something completely different...just someone who tends to punish a lot.
Jul
20
comment What do you call someone who always puts blame on others?
'Buckpasser' doesn't work: it simply means to pass (usually work) onto other people, when you should do it yourself. It's not specific enough for blaming other for things. 'Blameshifter' works better, or 'rationalizer', although I don't know there's a single word for all the things the OP is trying to describe.
Jul
20
answered Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
Jul
20
comment Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
'Perjurer' just means someone who lies under oath. You can be a perjurer lying about yourself, nothing necessarily to do with other people.