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seen Sep 12 at 8:21

Sep
12
comment What is the word for a man who keeps returning for other people to abuse him?
Yes, you're right Joseph Neathawk: the OP looks like he might be getting something out of it.
Jul
20
comment What is the word for a man who keeps returning for other people to abuse him?
'Glutton for punishment' doesn't imply he enjoys it or gets something out of it. You can be a glutton for punishment, and hate doing what you're doing because for example, you're trying to get ahead in a job. You still do it, not because you like the treatment you get, but because you've got your eye on a bigger prize. The OP's example refers to someone with a pathology, which is why 'masochist' works better.
Jul
20
answered Tenses in the sentence
Jul
20
comment What do you call someone who always puts blame on others?
'Punitive' means something completely different...just someone who tends to punish a lot.
Jul
20
comment What do you call someone who always puts blame on others?
'Buckpasser' doesn't work: it simply means to pass (usually work) onto other people, when you should do it yourself. It's not specific enough for blaming other for things. 'Blameshifter' works better, or 'rationalizer', although I don't know there's a single word for all the things the OP is trying to describe.
Jul
20
answered Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
Jul
20
comment Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
'Perjurer' just means someone who lies under oath. You can be a perjurer lying about yourself, nothing necessarily to do with other people.
Jul
20
comment Word or expression for someone who intentionally says false statements to bring someone else down?
'Bully' means something completely different, although someone who intentionally says false things may be a bully too.
Jul
20
comment ostentatious vs pretentious
You're slightly off base: 'ostentatious' doesn't refer to class at all, it merely means 'showy'. 'Pretentious' in a de facto way, does refer to class, as in having pretensions to something you're not. It's usually the lower classes aping the upper classes, but an 'inverted snob' is pretentious too.
Jul
20
answered An exact word for the opposite of academic progress?
Jul
20
comment What's the difference betwen perhaps and maybe?
I think you're right, there's no real difference, but if you look at the makeup of the words, you might argue 'maybe' refers to something in the future 'it may come to pass', while perhaps looks as if it 'might' (past tense) have happened. I guess you could make a rule out of that if you were really fastidious!
Jul
20
comment “Go ahead and head on over to …”
You might be getting the downvotes because nobody else sees anything going on here, and the question looks like it's been made up for the hell of it. I'm not sure where you got the idea the phrase is getting more common. It just looks like unwieldy language to me. A less awkward way to say it would be 'go ahead and visit...'.
Jul
20
comment What should be the proper reply for thanks?
'Thanks' kind of shuts the conversation down, and sorry to say, doesn't invite a response. Best advice is to start a new conversation, like 'how are you feeling now?'
Jul
20
comment Word for substances which help you escape your problems
'Nepenthe': lovely word.
Jul
20
comment Word for substances which help you escape your problems
It's a poor fit: 'palliative' simply means 'relief without curative intent', nothing to do with pleasure.
Jul
20
comment Word for substances which help you escape your problems
Great work: anodyne!
Jul
20
comment Word for substances which help you escape your problems
'Dopamine' does not, and has never been used to describe 'a substance that helps you forget your troubles'. I'm not sure where you've seen it used that way - possibly on TV, where it's described by laymen as a neurochemical associated with pleasure, which is where you may have got confused. It's not just associated with pleasure either: a surfeit of dopamine is believed to be one aspect of schizophrenia, and most drugs used to treat it suppress particular dopamine receptor subtypes.
Jul
20
comment Why was “how much” used in the following context instead of “how many”?
The sentence is not perfectly well written ie. it's using a grammer rule for much/many to make its meaning clear. It's only obvious that 'much' refers to elasticity because it's the singular noun. 'Many' would refer to buyers and sellers because they're plural. The rule is straightforward, despite the overanalysis (and incorrect reasoning) in some of the answers below: 'much' refers to a singular noun, 'many' refers to a plural noun.
Jul
20
comment Ambiguous pronouns
The example you provided makes sense to your (and probably everybody's elses) ear because you've chosen two nouns where fear is far more relevant to the first than the second. Contrary to your assertion that 'amost any similar phrase...', there are lots of cases where the meaning is unclear. The OP's was one (hence the question). Here's another: 'The chemical's viscosity and its effect on frogs is detrimental'. So, no, given that kind of example, we don't agree.
Jul
1
answered A better phrase for 'construction of mock-up objects by following historical recipes'