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location Australia
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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Nov 18 '13 at 23:49

Nov
19
comment Up one's ass vs. In one's ass
No it doesn't mean 'far in' at all. It's simply a phrase that adds rudeness to 'arse'.
Aug
1
comment “There is a large number” Or “There are a large number”?
I think the reason so many native speakers get it confused is that 'number' refers most often to many objects, so people automatically use 'are' plural. Very common mistake amongst native speakers, I'm not sure if it's the same in other languages, but it's like to occur in them as well! TrevorD, that doesn't answer his question - he was wondering why so many people get it confused, not the reason why 'number' is singular.
Jul
31
comment Difference between “of” and “for”
It's just a rule in English on verbs and their associated prepositions: you accuse someone 'of' doing something. There's no 'why' to it. Each language has their own peculiarities, there's not a lot of reason to it, just something to learn when you learn the verb I'm afraid.
Jul
31
answered “There is a large number” Or “There are a large number”?
Jul
8
answered How to acknowledge a contribution of a deceased person?
Jul
8
comment Difference between “did + verb” and just “verb+ed”
"Did + verb" also emphasises a response to a suggestion something didn't occur eg. You were not at my party last night! Excuse me, but I did attend your party last night!
Jul
8
comment Exasperated/frustrated at someone’s naïveté
Exasperation was a good suggestion. Gob-smacked and stupefied might work, but they're a bit stronger.
Jul
7
answered Is it “when he's massaging me” or “while he's massaging me” : which one is correct?
Jun
16
awarded  Supporter
Jun
16
comment How do you say “hands-on experience” with this technology to an interviewer?
There's nothing oxymoronic about the phrase 'practical experience'. You can have experiences with something that are not practical. 'Practical' implies that you not only experienced it (eg. by reading a book), but you actually used it to do something.
Jun
16
comment Morally speaking, 1+1=2
Interesting question Lucas. I'd rather hear from a mathematician describing the use of the word instead of others postulating on what sentiment it might entail.
Jun
16
comment Should “How long were you at work?” have a simple or a compound tense?
No, it doesn't imply time. You need 'for' to make it imply time in the context of your original sentence. 'How long have you known each other' does work however (although strictly it too should be 'for how long') because 'known' and 'long' together more strongly imply time. 'Long' and 'at work' could refer to length which is why you have to qualify it. This is all pretty marginal stuff, colloquially people will understand what you mean with your original sentence.
Jun
16
comment Should “How long were you at work?” have a simple or a compound tense?
'How long were you at work yesterday' is still incorrect, unless you qualify what 'long' actually refers to: height, time etc. 'For...long' is the correct way to question time duration. (ps. I've ignored the perennial 'don't end a sentence with a preposition' problem here).
Jun
16
awarded  Critic
Jun
16
comment Should “How long were you at work?” have a simple or a compound tense?
'For how long were you at work' would be more correct in the most obvious context. 'How long were you at work' doesn't specify what 'long' refers to: was it the time at work, or your (horizontal) length, or even the size of your genitals? With the right qualification, the sentence is fine: it might imply (in the future) questioning something that happened in the past eg. a policeman making enquiries about a crime.
Jun
16
comment Word for feeling conflicting emotions simultaneously
'Turmoil' might be result of the torn emotions, but is not specific to emotions or even the result of a choice. It simply means greatly disturbed (for whatever reason) eg. 'the city was in turmoil after the breakdown of government'.
Nov
24
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
awarded  Commentator
Nov
16
comment Old-fashioned use of “because”
It's not a case of omission. This archaic use of the word 'because' means 'the cause of which' ie. 'the cause of which he was that he was not permitted to...etc'.
Nov
16
comment A word for that which is created from a template?
'Instance' works, although it tends to have a more specific meaning ie. an object created according to a class definition. 'Copy' is a more general word eg. in biology where a DNA template results in 'copies'.