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Aug
19
comment Suitable words to describe 'the act of defining parameters' and 'set of parameters' in a software
“Configuration” is definitely what I would use for “a set of parameters”, and the corresponding verb would be simply “configure”.
Aug
18
comment Phrase about purity of a solid substance
@deadrat: I understand that, I just thought that the “most” in OP’s question was a red herring.
Aug
18
answered Pictographs and other types of writing
Aug
18
answered Phrase about purity of a solid substance
Aug
17
comment How to express the idea that you are so scared that you almost pee in your pants? “be scared to pee” maybe?
@user105551: Yes, it’s idiomatic. I’ve heard “it scared the piss out of me” mainly from UK and Southern American English speakers. In general American usage, I think you’re more likely to hear “it scared the shit out of me”. “I am scared the shit out of me” is not correct, but “I was scared shitless” is idiomatic.
Aug
17
answered How to express the idea that you are so scared that you almost pee in your pants? “be scared to pee” maybe?
Aug
4
revised Can you contract the main verb in a sentence?
edited body
Aug
4
comment Can you contract the main verb in a sentence?
@JanusBahsJacquet: You’re right, that’s what I meant to refer to—the word with which the verb has been contracted.
Jul
16
comment Is “Why to… …” grammatical?
@JanusBahsJacquet: To me, “Why use X?” is a question and requires a question mark, unlike “Why to use X”. “Tell me why to care” sounds perfectly fine to me, for example; without to, it would be “Tell me: why care?”
Jul
14
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
3
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
2
awarded  Enlightened
Jul
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
19
comment Why “enough for to fill” instead of “enough to fill” in this sentence?
This may have been due to influence from French, in which you say for example Je me suis arreté pour prendre des photos, “I stopped (for) to take some photos”. Here “for to” means essentially “in order to”.
May
20
comment What does 'Hitlerian' mean, extract from Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita
1955 is 10 years after Adolf Hitler’s death, so it certainly can be a reference to him!
May
20
accepted Name for balls of dirt made by rubbing hands
May
20
comment Does “moot” only apply to points?
These people probably think of moot point as a stormy petrel. It is valid to use moot to describe other things, but few people do.
May
20
comment What is the English version of the Vietnamese idiom “như cá nằm trên thớt” - “like a fish on cutting board”
I have only heard the first as (like a) lamb to the slaughter. That seems to be the most common phrasing, but others are widely used—some with lambs instead of a lamb, some with led, some without the.
May
20
comment Where did the DO NOT come from?
The passage in question: “Did I open?” = “Nes i agor?” / “I did not open.” = “Nes i ddim agor.” / “I opened.” = “Nes i agor.” The last example is used non-emphatically as late as Elizabethan English: “I did open the door for thee.”
May
20
comment Where did the DO NOT come from?
@Mitch: Welsh is one of the few languages that uses do in this way, along with Cornish. As far as I know, do-support (as it’s called) wasn’t present in English until the 1100s at the earliest. It stands to reason that English picked it up from contact with those neighbouring languages. I first learned of this from Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue by John McWhorter.