Reputation
Next privilege 250 Rep.
View close votes
Badges
2
Newest
 Supporter
Impact
~21k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 2 votes cast
Aug
24
comment Is it true that Chinese speakers have troubles with 'r's and 'l's in English words?
As a data point, it's the same for Italian; a local working here at a Chinese restaurant in Italy pronounced "grazie" as "gelazie", which initially confused me as being another word, as am I not a native Italian speaker, but I later realized was a speech imperfection. I expect this falls in the category of "r at the beginning of a word".
Mar
30
answered What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?
Mar
30
awarded  Supporter
Mar
30
comment What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?
Also gushingly. To flow forth suddenly in great volume: water gushing from a hydrant.
Mar
30
comment What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?
I'd add to that gushingly. To flow forth suddenly in great volume: water gushing from a hydrant.
Mar
30
comment What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?
Also, I'd risk gurgulingly.
Mar
30
comment What is the “thirsty” equivalent of “ravenously”?
I like “gulped desperately” too.
Nov
30
awarded  Teacher
Nov
18
comment “Told” vs. “said to” somebody
People can say anything. That's the point of the difference between ‘say’ and ‘tell’. ‘Tell’ is restricted to informative/imperative, ‘say’ is arbitrary utterances. Example, “if you say any more lies about Mary I'll tape your mouth up!”
Nov
18
answered “Told” vs. “said to” somebody