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bio website thatsmathematics.com
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
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2d
comment How do you pronounce the surname Derges
This meta thread seemed to reach the conclusion that pronunciation of proper names was on topic if the person named was sufficiently famous.
Apr
10
comment Are there metaphoric English expressions meaning “keeping composure at a fatal moment, never panicky”?
That's just the opposite of composure, though.
Apr
10
comment Food Rhyme with No
Pho looks like an answer but actually isn't.
Apr
10
comment Is there a word for someone who has a flaw?
Unfortunately, defective is also an offensive term for someone with a severe physical or mental disability, so I don't think it would be appropriate to apply to a person in this context.
Apr
4
comment What do you call a man's skirt?
If you look at the pictures in that article, a loincloth is much shorter and doesn't wrap around the thighs.
Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
@JoeBlow: I've seen changeling used to suggest more generally that the child is unlike the rest of the family in some way, though it can refer to differences in personality rather than appearance. I recall seeing it in some Agatha Christie novels, for instance. I can find citations if you'd like.
Mar
25
comment Is there any word for a person who ruins magician's trick?
"Ruins" the trick in what way? By explaining how it's done (ruining the mystery) or actually disrupting or interfering with the performance itself?
Mar
10
comment US Route 101 — “The 101”
+1 for noting that it is localized to southern California. Northern Californians don't do this.
Mar
6
comment Can “Mr”, “Mrs”, etc. be used with a first name?
@TimLymington: "Only a servant": I'm not sure about that. In "The Reigate Squires", "Mister Alec" is referred to as such by both Sherlock Holmes and Inspector Forrester, neither of them servants. For another citation, I looked at Pride and Prejudice (1813). Elizabeth Bennet is addressed (to her face) as "Miss Eliza" by Sir William Lucas (I.VI), and as "Miss Elizabeth" by Mr. Collins (I.XVII) and Miss Bingley (I.XVIII).
Mar
4
comment What is the meaning of “Body Electric”?
This is a great answer, but it would help if you'd add specific citations for the quotes. In particular, the first quoted passage is from Whitman, but in context it looks like you're saying it's from le Monnier.
Feb
11
comment Why does “quadratic” describe second power while “quad” usually describes “four”?
@iamnotmaynard: You're right, of course. Brain failure. (Quadric is actually a second-power thing again.)
Jan
29
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
28
comment Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?
On the other hand, a phrase like "she shared his bed" is definitely sexual. (Google it if you like.)
Dec
25
answered Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
Dec
25
comment Why is the movie named “Hot Fuzz”?
I assumed it was a pun on "hot fudge", a popular ice cream topping (at least in the US).
Nov
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
comment What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?
I always understood morph as specifically referring to a change in shape. Since a zombie is (roughly) the same shape as a human, I wouldn't think morph would fit here.
Nov
16
comment What is the difference between “University of Bla” and “Bla University”?
@FeralOink: Drifting off topic, but Cornell University is indeed a public-private hybrid. The university consists of several colleges, some of which are "contract colleges" which are funded directly by the State of New York. Others are "endowed colleges" which are funded by tuition and endowment like any other private institution. More info.
Nov
14
comment Question about a sentence in OWL Exercises
The question is presumably asking about the grammar of the sentence, not whether the situation described could actually happen in real life.
Nov
11
comment “I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”
Rob it off you also sounds more colloquial.