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2d
comment Is the word 'lousy' used more often in the UK than in the US?
There are two senses of the word. As an informal term meaning bad, I think of it as very typically American, though probably more common 50 years ago than now. There is also the phrase lousy with, meaning filled or metaphorically infested with, as in the shop is lousy with tourists, which seems less common in the US and maybe is more common in the UK.
2d
answered A word meaning <a short article or essay>
2d
comment A word meaning <a short article or essay>
Vignette might fit except for the first letter.
2d
comment What do we say when glue does not stick anymore?
"Ye are the glue of the earth; but if the glue have lost his stickiness, wherewith shall it be stuck? It is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under the foot of men, whereupon, behold, it shall again be sticky, and shall make annoying noises as they walk, and thou shalt nevermore be able to remove it."
Nov
23
comment Is there a word for a fake radar reading?
@HotLicks: Artifact was the first word I thought of, as well. Would you like to post that as an answer?
Nov
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
21
revised What does 'TL;DR' mean and how is it used?
connect to summary meaning
Nov
21
answered What does 'TL;DR' mean and how is it used?
Nov
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
12
comment What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?
It still seems to me that red herring fits. Can you explain more specifically why you think it doesn't?
Nov
11
comment What's a parallel for 'mitigate', for worsening a good situation?
Along the same lines as counter is counteract. That's the word I would probably use here.
Nov
5
comment Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
@PatrickM: Troll in the sense of an Internet troublemaker is certainly at least that old. The sense of a real-life prankster is newer, and most of the UD definitions don't include that sense (though some do).
Nov
5
comment Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
@HotLicks: The "social media community" is rapidly approaching a majority of the population in many places, and in certain demographics (e.g. teenagers in industrialized nations) probably represents nearly everybody. (I'm not saying they all know this word, of course.)
Nov
5
answered Is there a slang word or phrase for someone who is always playing dirty tricks or unpleasant practical jokes on his friends and acquaintances?
Nov
3
comment What's the single word to describe the smell of the perfume of someone who just walked by?
Do you think sillage is likely to be understood by readers outside the fragrance industry?
Nov
3
answered What's the single word to describe the smell of the perfume of someone who just walked by?
Nov
2
comment Generic term for someone who looks after children
Should the term also include parents, legal guardians, etc?
Oct
30
comment “Childlessness is hereditary in our family” What do you call a statement containing a contradiction such as the example?
I think you answered your own question with absurd. (If you want a noun, try absurdity.)
Oct
24
comment What does “mertilize” mean?
January 2009 is definitely not the correct date of the comic. I can make out the date 11-20 in the third panel but not the copyright year in the fourth. However, here is another strip with a mertilizer which is dated December 8, 1985 - the earliest mention of the term in Calvin and Hobbes (the strip only started a few weeks prior, and I checked all the previous strips).
Oct
21
comment Word for obscuring bad or immoral acts with verbiage
@VolkerSiegel: Almost but not quite. 1984 used doublethink (the ability to simultaneously believe two contradictory things) and Newspeak (the political language of the Party). Doublespeak seems to be a related, but later, coinage.