Reputation
3,579
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
10 26
Impact
~604k people reached

Sep
1
answered What is the English word meaning “of low possibility”?
Aug
26
answered Term for when someone interferes with another's authority?
Aug
24
comment What is the correct term for paper that has become wet and deformed as it dried out?
I usually just call it water damaged.
Aug
22
comment Why “man” not “men” in “Many a brave man”?
These days, I don't think I'd call this "formal" but rather "poetic". I wouldn't use it in formal non-fiction writing (reports, articles, etc). I usually see it in period pieces, dramatic writing, songs, poems, etc.
Aug
16
answered Alternative idiom to “phone it in”
Aug
7
comment “Kafkaesque” vs. “Kafkan”
@Mitch: That's a kaftan.
Aug
3
comment What is the origin of “Here's How!”?
Pretty sure I have heard it used in at least one American movie from the 30s or 40s (maybe a Bogart movie?) but unfortunately Google is not helpful at finding it. I think one character offered "Here's how" as a toast, and another responded "And how".
Aug
3
comment Is there an adverb in English, meaning “with an interest”?
"Ardently" might suggest a little too much enthusiasm - I feel like it connotes just a hint of sexual excitement.
Aug
2
comment In what English-speaking communities does “trump” refer to the breaking of wind?
This has got to make bridge games really entertaining.
Aug
1
answered What's the origin of the “Dare to …” pattern for slogans?
Aug
1
comment What's the origin of the “Dare to …” pattern for slogans?
Hmm, I just noticed the Wikipedia page for Sapere aude. Maybe this is the answer.
Aug
1
asked What's the origin of the “Dare to …” pattern for slogans?
Aug
1
comment Etymology of 'clinical' in 'clinical professor'?
Here is a job posting for a "Clinical Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education" at a major US university. I've seen this term used within academia (at least in the US) to refer to jobs that do not require conducting research. Maybe it is verging on technical jargon but this usage does exist, and I think it's reasonable to ask how it arose.
Aug
1
comment Bernie Taupin's “Voyeur” lyric
Please see meta.english.stackexchange.com/questions/995/…
Jul
28
comment Proper response to “Do the needful”, when the “needful” might not be clearly defined
@DanBron: I don't think it's specifically native speakers who should object to this idiom, since they have the equivalent do what's necessary or do what needs to be done.
Jul
25
asked Is “banker friend” a noun adjunct, or something else?
Jul
24
comment How to use the word “magistricide”?
There's an old joke exploiting this ambiguity: "Why did the ant spray himself with Raid? He wanted to commit insecticide."
Jul
24
comment How to use the word “magistricide”?
Note that there are two slightly different paradigms in these -cide words: some of them (homicide, regicide) mean "the act of killing" (Joe is guilty of homicide) or, more archaically, a person who kills (Macbeth was a regicide); but others (pesticide, herbicide) mean "a substance that kills". In this case it should be clear from context that magistricide would be the former, unless you were being jocular (he put magistricide in his teacher's coffee).
Jul
23
revised Why “Koran” changed to “Quran”?
tag
Jul
8
awarded  single-word-requests