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Jan
16
revised What is a simpler/more natural way to say “One defines himself with his doings!”
descriptive title
Jan
15
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
4
comment “Due to buy a house” vs “due to look for a house”
I don't see that there's any difference, grammatically. "Due to look" sounds fine to me.
Jan
3
comment Why “the powers that be”?
@OldBunny2800: Yes, the Epistle to the Romans is part of the New Testament. (Google would have told you that, too.)
Dec
15
comment What is the etymology of the term “Cockpit”?
The transition from "fighting pit / theatre" to "ship compartment" seems like the biggest leap. Are there theories as to how that happened? My only guess is that if the cockpit of a ship was where the wounded were treated, there would be a lot of blood and guts in there, as there would in a cock-fighting pit.
Dec
14
comment So, “carrots too” (/ˈkærəts tuː/) can sound like “Carrot Sue” (/ˈkærət suː/), right?
Hmm, I practiced your last two examples, and I think I do drop the t, or at least reduce it to something barely audible. (Native US speaker.)
Dec
13
comment What does “Brooklyn“ mean in “Everyone need to move to Brooklyn. If we don’t stop wasting our time, the economy is going to be in real trouble.”?
@HotLicks: Once upon a time that was true. These days, Brooklyn is better known as the center of hipster culture, one of whose main features is a fascination with old-fashioned and "artisanal" products and processes; things done by hand on a small scale. Pickling, knitting, crafting, and making moonshine would all fit in. (Brooklyn is home to a number of "craft distilleries" which are essentially the modern equivalent of moonshine.) So I think that's the reference that's intended. This may be less a question about language and more about culture, though.
Dec
9
comment What is the term to describe someone who deliberately drives into oncoming traffic?
Note, however, that wrong-way driver doesn't have a connotation of deliberateness.
Dec
7
comment Why does Obama call them “Lone Wolf Actors”? (Etymology of Lone Wolf)
@HotLicks: Oddly, in The Jungle Book, Akela starts out as the leader of a wolf pack, and becomes an outcast later, but is called "the Lone Wolf" throughout.
Dec
6
comment Why does Obama call them “Lone Wolf Actors”? (Etymology of Lone Wolf)
@ermanen: Earlier: Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book (1894) in which Akela is called "the Lone Wolf". Of course in this case Akela is an actual wolf, so the term is literal and not metaphorical, but I wonder if this could be the origin.
Nov
17
awarded  Yearling
Nov
10
comment A word that describes a liquid's tendency to form bubbles
If the bubbles are specifically caused by soap or soap-like substances, you could say the liquid is sudsy.
Nov
9
comment Suitable saying for “different people like/dislike different things”?
@Au101: The link has "to each his own".
Oct
25
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
8
comment what do you call a person who doesn't believe what another says anymore because that person is always lying?
Can't get fooled again.
Oct
8
comment what do you call a person who doesn't believe what another says anymore because that person is always lying?
Skeptical, dubious, doubtful...
Oct
1
comment What is an adjective for something that is both offensive and funny?
These are fairly specific to material that is sexually improper or indecent. If the joke is offensive for some other reason, risqué or racy would not apply so well.
Oct
1
revised One word for “bringing someone up to speed”
improve example slightly
Oct
1
answered One word for “bringing someone up to speed”
Oct
1
comment What is the name for the glove worn to take out baked food from oven, so that touching the hot tray doesn't burn our hands?
"A glove leaving the fingers and thumb-tip exposed" is only one of the definitions given at your link, and clearly not the one meant here.