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8h
comment Word to describe someone who goes to all the events in town!
Man about town is certainly a fine expression (albeit gender-specific), but I don't think I've ever seen the acronym MAT before now.
2d
comment What is a word for a condition one is born with?
@Jake: "Congenital liar" is a pretty common phrase.
Apr
9
comment An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure
@Silverfish: Comeback kid was already suggested.
Apr
9
answered An adjective to describe a person who has come back from failure
Mar
23
comment What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?
I've certainly seen "stall" used in cases where there was no physical structure enclosing the space, only the typical line.
Mar
23
comment What do you call the space where you park a car? Parking spot, space, bay or what?
@Mitch: I wouldn't say "no one". I have definitely seen it used in the US, usually in technical or quasi-legal contexts. I agree it is substantially less common than the alternatives.
Mar
7
comment A word to describe an incident or event that may or may not have taken place
Legendary can also be used to mean famous, however, which would be opposite the desired meaning.
Mar
6
answered Idiom request for recommending someone to end their toxic relationship/ friendship with somebody
Feb
27
comment What's a word for making a weapon inoperable for public display?
Not sure if this is quite right for your context, but the cosplay community seems to use the neologism peacebind for a similar situation. When a person tries to bring a replica weapon into a convention (as part of their costume), security personnel will verify that it cannot actually be used as a weapon, for instance by fastening a sword into its scabbard. This process is known as peacebinding.
Feb
10
comment “Butcher shops” sell meat products, what is the name of a shop that sells cheese and ice cream?
I believe I've also heard dairy store.
Jan
15
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
4
comment “Due to buy a house” vs “due to look for a house”
I don't see that there's any difference, grammatically. "Due to look" sounds fine to me.
Jan
3
comment Why “the powers that be”?
@OldBunny2800: Yes, the Epistle to the Romans is part of the New Testament. (Google would have told you that, too.)
Dec
15
comment What is the etymology of the term “Cockpit”?
The transition from "fighting pit / theatre" to "ship compartment" seems like the biggest leap. Are there theories as to how that happened? My only guess is that if the cockpit of a ship was where the wounded were treated, there would be a lot of blood and guts in there, as there would in a cock-fighting pit.
Dec
14
comment So, “carrots too” (/ˈkærəts tuː/) can sound like “Carrot Sue” (/ˈkærət suː/), right?
Hmm, I practiced your last two examples, and I think I do drop the t, or at least reduce it to something barely audible. (Native US speaker.)
Dec
13
comment What does “Brooklyn“ mean in “Everyone need to move to Brooklyn. If we don’t stop wasting our time, the economy is going to be in real trouble.”?
@HotLicks: Once upon a time that was true. These days, Brooklyn is better known as the center of hipster culture, one of whose main features is a fascination with old-fashioned and "artisanal" products and processes; things done by hand on a small scale. Pickling, knitting, crafting, and making moonshine would all fit in. (Brooklyn is home to a number of "craft distilleries" which are essentially the modern equivalent of moonshine.) So I think that's the reference that's intended. This may be less a question about language and more about culture, though.
Dec
9
comment What is the term to describe someone who deliberately drives into oncoming traffic?
Note, however, that wrong-way driver doesn't have a connotation of deliberateness.
Dec
7
comment Why does Obama call them “Lone Wolf Actors”? (Etymology of Lone Wolf)
@HotLicks: Oddly, in The Jungle Book, Akela starts out as the leader of a wolf pack, and becomes an outcast later, but is called "the Lone Wolf" throughout.
Dec
6
comment Why does Obama call them “Lone Wolf Actors”? (Etymology of Lone Wolf)
@ermanen: Earlier: Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book (1894) in which Akela is called "the Lone Wolf". Of course in this case Akela is an actual wolf, so the term is literal and not metaphorical, but I wonder if this could be the origin.
Nov
17
awarded  Yearling