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seen Apr 7 at 19:04

Nov
16
awarded  Yearling
Oct
29
awarded  Necromancer
Oct
3
awarded  Necromancer
Jul
25
answered Why is the spelling of “pronounce” and “pronunciation” different?
Jul
24
comment Schwa insertion into the bi-consonantal onset for emphasis?
It is an issue of whether the transition between g/k and r is open or close transition (in terms of Catford). The so-called shadow vowel (or schwa) between g/k and r shows an open transition. Similarly, when preachers add a shadow schwa after voiced consonants (like Goda for God, Jesusa for Jesus). In unmarked contexts, native speakers don't add these shadow vowels. The so-called half-devoicing for final voiced consonants is the same: if you voice after release, you end up with a shadow vowel (schwa); if you release after devoicing, people don't hear the shadow vowel.
Jun
24
comment Why is “victuals” pronounced “vittles”?
silent c: indict, victuals, arctic; silent p: receipt; silent s: isle, island; silent b: debt, doubt, subtle. All these have to do with 16th century zeal for etymological explanations.
Jun
12
comment Why does the pronunciation of the word “wife” [waif] change in the word “midwifery” [ˈmɪdˌwɪfərɪ]?
wifery: trisyllabic laxing, hence a short vowel; wife: open-syllable lengthening, hence a long vowel, followed by the great vowel shift.
Jun
10
comment What would you call a person from India?
Well, that's why they use "American Indians" for natives, "Indian Americans" for those of Indian descent (or from india). It is still confusing, though.
Jun
4
revised Why is “sergeant” pronounced “sargent”?
added 436 characters in body
May
24
answered Why is “sergeant” pronounced “sargent”?
Feb
1
comment Learn correct English pronunciation by non-verbal facial expressions
In voice schools (conservatory, voice studios, MFA/BFA programs), students are taught those skills: observe lips, teeth, buccinator, even the visible potion of tongue. For instance, Dudley Knight in his "Speaking with Skill" talks about 'vocal tract posture', which contains parameters that you are interested. In academic circles (like linguistics and phonetics offered by linguistics/phonetics professors), the instructors don't focus on developing these skills. Acquiring these skills are necessary for accent acquisition/elimination; but not sufficient, tho, since many other skills are required.
Feb
1
revised How to stress any word properly?
deleted 5 characters in body
Feb
1
revised How to stress any word properly?
deleted 5 characters in body
Feb
1
answered How to stress any word properly?
Jan
31
comment Why is 'worthy' pronounced with a /ði/ unlike 'healthy', 'wealthy' and 'stealthy'?
Maybe, voiceless /th/ itself is anomalous in words like earthen, earthy, filthy, frothy, lengthen, stealthy, wealthy, strengthen. Many ModE words with final voiceless /th/ once had voiced /th/ followed by a vowel. After having lost the final vowel, voiced /th/ became voiceless: beneaðn > beneath, eorðe > earth, piða > eahtoða > eighth.
Jan
26
comment What is modifying the “i” in Thumbelina and Carolina to alter its pronuciation?
Just look at the history of long vowels in English: in this case, long i. It has two variants in ModE: diphthong I; close vowel like in Lee. Same thing applies to long u: diphthong like in cow; and the close vowel like in soup. That's we have variant pronunciations for words like via and router. In two syllable words, you can see the first vowel as old long vowel due to open syllable lengthening: that's why you hear the first syllable of Dana like day. And this does not have that silent-e.
Jan
24
revised Pronunciation of “lib”
added 9 characters in body
Jan
24
revised Pronunciation of “lib”
deleted 1 characters in body
Jan
23
answered Pronunciation of “lib”
Jan
20
comment Why is the “L” silent when pronouncing “salmon”?
The point is not about bright and dark l. Non-existent l was introduced and pronounced in certain words. So, the explanation of appealing to some history does not work.