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Jun
10
comment Word for “ability to hide complexity”
@pageman: how do I contradict myself? I said '"obfuscate" is closer to "ability to hide simplicity"' and then I said 'obfuscating is a synonym of hiding simplicity'? I think you're totally confused of the meaning of the word.
Jun
9
comment Word for “ability to hide complexity”
@pageman: obfuscating is not a synonym of hiding/concealing. obfuscating is a synonym of hiding simplicity. obfuscating complexity is a weird expression trying to say hiding simplicity complexity, which doesn't make sense even if you make it grammatical. Without any additional adjectives, obfuscated something already carries the connotation of being more complex than something itself; while obfuscate complexity is merely redundant obfuscate simplicity is bizzare. See, dictionary.reference.com/browse/obfuscate to get a sense of the word.
Jun
9
comment Word for “ability to hide complexity”
@pageman: I think you're getting it wrong; "obfuscate" by itself, means taking something which is simple and make it more complex or appear more complex than it actually is. Obfuscation may be used to conceal data/information, but there are methods of concealing information that are not obfuscation. You can't obfuscate simplicity nor obfuscate complexity, they does not make sense.
Jun
8
comment Word for “ability to hide complexity”
I think the meaning of "obfuscate" is closer to "ability to hide simplicity"
Jun
8
comment Does the letter C serve any unique purpose?
Suppose that we're eliminating "C", how do you propose we spell "chair"?
Jun
8
answered What do you call a group of people that move a lot?
Jun
5
comment How can I write out 1.5?
Occasionally nought and ought are heard for zero, I think that depends on where you're coming from; nought is quite common around here in Sydney, although I personally don't particularly quite liked it.
May
26
answered How to properly write sentence with double words
May
26
comment “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
@FumbleFingers: Fair enough, lesser is a word; though I'm still not convinced that it is correct nor common to use lesser number than when comparing numbers. It is triple redundant.
May
26
comment “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
@FubmleFingers: at least in a mathematician's POV, "lower" and "smaller" has no well-defined meaning; only less and greater has well defined meaning when comparing numbers. I'd personally suggest the OP to ask whoever wrote the sentence what they actually mean when they wrote that.
May
26
comment “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
@FumbleFingers: The problem is that "lesser" is used by neither mathematicians nor regular people; I'd probably argue that it's not even a word. The second problem is that you can construct any evidence on NGram by carefully choosing "less/lower/smaller", "less number/lower number/smaller number", "less than/lower than/smaller than", etc. Third, the OP italicized only the "lower" and "smaller" not "lower number" or "smaller number", therefore your interpretation of the question is not the privileged interpretation either. Lastly, "less number" is redundant as "less" usually implies numbers.
May
26
comment “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
@FumbleFingers: NGram is deceiving; lesser is non-grammatical or at least very uncommon in mathematics or everyday life as "less" already implies a comparison. See my edit.
May
26
revised “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
added 154 characters in body
May
22
revised “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
added 50 characters in body
May
22
awarded  Teacher
May
22
revised “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
added 313 characters in body; deleted 14 characters in body; deleted 2 characters in body
May
22
answered “Lower number” vs. “smaller number”
May
3
comment How should one pronounce the “rofl” in “roflstomp” or “roflcopter”?
@The Raven: yeah true, in my idiolect, "wish" rhymes with "ghoti"
May
2
comment How should one pronounce the “rofl” in “roflstomp” or “roflcopter”?
with the invention of Internet, and the shift to text-based communication as the primary means of communicating, many words are coined that are never meant to be pronounced. I would advise against using them in speech except for discussion about the words themselves. And in those discussions, it is always fun to start with arguing whose pronunciation is right.
May
2
comment What are “real stores” called in English, as opposed to “online stores”?
be careful that your audience -- especially older or less technically savvy ones -- might misunderstood brick and mortar store as being a store that sells actual bricks and mortars.