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visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Mar 17 at 16:51

May
29
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Jan
11
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Jan
9
asked What is the origin of Zulu time?
Dec
19
comment In a software meant to be used internationally, should I use “post code”, “postal code” or “zip code”?
Is it for release in English-speaking countries only or are you aiming at a wider market?
Dec
18
answered What is a verb for “the usage of an angry tone of voice”?
Dec
17
comment What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
While it is true that it isn't straightforward to go to North Korea, I do believe that tourism to the North has increased. On top of that, I think it has acquired a bit of a reputation as an authentic, adventurous destination - one of the last places of its kind on the face of the planet. Thus, while most people do indeed travel to South Korea I am not surprised that you are asked whether you travelled to the South or the North when you just use the term Korea.
Dec
17
comment What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
This makes me wonder whether interpretation of the term "Korea" is subject to regional differences. Perhaps to Americans the term is less ambiguous as to others owing to the Korean War and the remaining presence of US troops in South Korea. It would be interesting to hear more people's views on this.
Dec
17
answered What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
Dec
17
comment How to correctly express volume units
@Luiz: I googled a bit and it seems like 1-foot cube is actually used in the way you want to use it. It was used to refer to aquariums though, so I'm not sure whether the "30-centimetre cubic space" construct would be readily understood by everyone (it just sounds less natural than 1-foot cube) but it does appear to be grammatically sound. To adapt Brian's suggestion a bit, could you say "the air in a 30cm cubic space, which is equal in volume to the contents of fourteen 2-litre Coca-Cola bottles.
Dec
17
comment What is the difference between “English” and “British”?
@Hugo: Yes, I always feel bad when having to tag on Wales at the end of my explanation. Who knows, maybe the Union Jack will be updated to include that red dragon at some point in the future so that my visual explanation can be conducted without footnotes.
Dec
16
comment Can the word “orbital” mean expensive/high?
I suspect you heard someone say "exorbitant fees", which would indeed mean unreasonably high fees.
Dec
16
comment How to correctly express volume units
@Luiz: To me, "30 cm cubic volume" seems rather confusing (and I suspect it may even be grammatically incorrect) as it seems to mix a measure of length with a measure of volume. To adapt Brian's suggestion, I would say a "30x30x30 cm volume" would be much better. But is there any reason why you cannot use "the air in "28.3 dm3" or "28.3 cubic decimetres"? Would this be too technical for you intended audience? Perhaps you could say something like "the volume of air in a 30x30x30 cm cardboard box (or container)" to make it easier to visualize?
Dec
16
comment What is the difference between “English” and “British”?
@Hugo: I quite agree! I do fear it will be a long time yet before the distinction is readily recognized in countries outside the UK though. Most people are also not aware that the Union Jack merges the flags or England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland - and I find it's always great fun, and a good visual aid to boot, to show them how the flags combine when explaining the difference between England and the UK.
Dec
16
comment What is the difference between “English” and “British”?
@Mitch: Just to note, using the words "England" or "English" when referring to the UK or British is quite common the world over. To illustrate, people in The Netherlands, France, China, Japan, and Indonesia frequently refer to England when they actually mean the UK. It's not just Americans that tend to treat the two as nearly synonymous!
Dec
15
comment Does the comma here draw special attention to an additional fact?
Just to provide some context: The Economist uses "most of the time" because some of Walmart's stores in China were temporarily closed due to the mislabelling of certain products (regular pork as organic pork, if I recall correctly).
Dec
15
comment What term is used for the closing of a letter?
I would suggest they come in word pairs, i.e. salutation-valediction and opening-closing. When using one of the terms in a word pair it would be proper form to also use the other (although proper form is often not called for, of course).
Dec
15
comment Proper term for people from eastern Asia
In that case my last paragraph isn't of much use to you. As for people of Asian descent who were born or raised outside of Asia, in my experience they tend to be quite specific - if asked about their ethnic origin at all, of course. Some of my Dutch friends have described themselves as being of Dutch-Vietnamese origin (mixed), Chinese-Indonesian (but Dutch nationality), Hong Kong-born, and plain ethnically Chinese or Indonesian. I don't generally hear any of them referring to themselves with a broad term such as "Asian" when their ethnic origins are concerned - they tend to be very specific.
Dec
15
revised Proper term for people from eastern Asia
Added links to dictionaries.