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asked What is the origin of Zulu time?
Dec
19
comment In a software meant to be used internationally, should I use “post code”, “postal code” or “zip code”?
Is it for release in English-speaking countries only or are you aiming at a wider market?
Dec
18
answered What is a verb for “the usage of an angry tone of voice”?
Dec
17
comment What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
While it is true that it isn't straightforward to go to North Korea, I do believe that tourism to the North has increased. On top of that, I think it has acquired a bit of a reputation as an authentic, adventurous destination - one of the last places of its kind on the face of the planet. Thus, while most people do indeed travel to South Korea I am not surprised that you are asked whether you travelled to the South or the North when you just use the term Korea.
Dec
17
comment What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
This makes me wonder whether interpretation of the term "Korea" is subject to regional differences. Perhaps to Americans the term is less ambiguous as to others owing to the Korean War and the remaining presence of US troops in South Korea. It would be interesting to hear more people's views on this.
Dec
17
answered What does the most common usage of 'Korea' mean in modern-day English-speaking world?
Dec
17
comment How to correctly express volume units
@Luiz: I googled a bit and it seems like 1-foot cube is actually used in the way you want to use it. It was used to refer to aquariums though, so I'm not sure whether the "30-centimetre cubic space" construct would be readily understood by everyone (it just sounds less natural than 1-foot cube) but it does appear to be grammatically sound. To adapt Brian's suggestion a bit, could you say "the air in a 30cm cubic space, which is equal in volume to the contents of fourteen 2-litre Coca-Cola bottles.
Dec
17
comment What is the difference between “English” and “British”?
@Hugo: Yes, I always feel bad when having to tag on Wales at the end of my explanation. Who knows, maybe the Union Jack will be updated to include that red dragon at some point in the future so that my visual explanation can be conducted without footnotes.
Dec
16
comment Can the word “orbital” mean expensive/high?
I suspect you heard someone say "exorbitant fees", which would indeed mean unreasonably high fees.