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Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
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13
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
4
awarded  Good Question
Nov
28
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
14
awarded  Yearling
Aug
13
asked Analysis (tree diagram) of “She hugged and kissed her mother”
May
8
comment What's going on in “I have been to the store many times”?
I hadn't noticed the distinction in meaning between gone and been; thanks to Fr0zenFyr and Shoe. But what I was really getting at was how been could be more than the PP of be; it seems irregular in a very special way that I don't see elsewhere. It isn't in any dictionaries I've checked. I'm looking to understand this not just in terms of when I can use been and when I can't (I'm a native English speaker), but also whether this is just an isolated example of this kind of exception, how it came to be, etc. One doesn't usually find specific words that violate rules in their own way.
May
8
comment Why is the accusative case used for a “topic”?
Whoops, I didn't know it was wrong to say "accusative"; I was just referring to the pronouns me, them, us, him, etc. @RegDwightΒВBẞ8 I guess I didn't know that the objective case was the default. It just seems strange then that people always talk about the subject and the object, the nominative case and then the accusative case, to where it seems like the "main" one is the first. Also, when you say "objective" it makes it sound like it ought to be the object of a verb, whereas the "subject" form of a pronoun seems like it ought to be able to serve just that purpose, e.g. in a title.
May
8
asked Why is the accusative case used for a “topic”?
May
8
asked What's going on in “I have been to the store many times”?
Mar
19
answered What does “Mitt Romney pretends to be a Nascar, cheesy-grits guy” mean?
Dec
26
answered Is it “convince someone to” or “convince someone of”?
Dec
22
comment Adverbs, prepositions, nouns, “home”, and “about”
@JohnLawler Well, I won't pretend to have read everything you linked (!) or to really know what I'm talking about in the rest of this comment, and I hope I've clarified my question a bit in the edit above ... it seems to me the discussions in your links are about semantics, and I was just wondering how about works syntactically.
Dec
22
comment Adverbs, prepositions, nouns, “home”, and “about”
Thanks. See my edit of the question.
Dec
22
revised Adverbs, prepositions, nouns, “home”, and “about”
fixed FumbleFingers
Dec
22
asked Adverbs, prepositions, nouns, “home”, and “about”
Dec
6
revised Is “a ways to go” grammatically correct?
added Merriam Webster's
Dec
6
awarded  Teacher
Dec
6
answered Is “a ways to go” grammatically correct?
Nov
25
awarded  Nice Question