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1d
comment Is the “if only” construction correct in the following phrase?
Do you understand why "If they had accepted ..., it wouldn't have been so bad" is correct?
1d
comment Yearning without Hope
+1. Some relevant evidence: the phrase "yearning for the past" is well-attested.
1d
comment Name for a groom, in relation to the best man
Are you looking for a term that can still be used ten years from now ("I need some vacation time next month, my ___ is coming to visit"), even if you serve as best man in multiple weddings for multiple grooms during that time? Or are you looking for a term for the duration of the event? If the latter, then -- people normally just say "the groom".
Jan
26
comment What's an antonym of demonize (other than deify)?
@ElliottFrisch: Could you post that as an answer? It's the best suggestion on the page.
Jan
25
comment What is the correct passive form of the word “checker”?
@ColinFine: I've seen it argued that -ee is essentially absolutive (in the sense of ergative-absolutive morphosyntactic alignment): when a verb V is transitive, V-ee only ever indicates the patient (never the agent), but when a verb V is intransitive, V-ee may still be possible (even though there's no patient), in which case it indicates the sole argument.
Jan
15
revised Do you *ever* need to use “of” with possessive “s”?
+1, but srsly
Jan
15
comment Are there any “fake” French words used in English?
@Joshua: "We" is a tricky word. Your expectations may not match other people's.
Jan
9
comment Term for when a negative word is used positively?
Despite what people often claim, "literally" is never used to mean "figuratively". It's often used in statements that are not literally true; but it's never used to mean that a statement is not literally true.
Jan
8
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
6
comment Why is the euphemism “comfort women” so heavily used?
@FumbleFingers: The scare quotes definitely convey negative connotations, but even with scare quotes, I definitely think "comfort women" is softer than "sex slaves", "forced prostitutes", or "rape victims" (let alone, say, "women who were systematically beaten and raped day and night for months on end by large numbers of foreign soldiers"). Do you really believe otherwise, or are you exaggerating for effect?
Jan
2
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
2
comment Is “one needs only” or “one need only” correct?
I think this question is just fine here. The fact that Jessica B didn't know the answer -- she knew to use need, but not the reason why -- is evidence that this question can be of value to native speakers, not just learners.
Jan
2
reviewed Approve Is “one needs only” or “one need only” correct?
Jan
2
answered Is “one needs only” or “one need only” correct?
Jan
1
comment Do dictionaries use polysemes in definitions without sufficiently explaining which sense/s is/are involved?
+1. In other words, this definition is trying to help you understand occurrences you might encounter, but apparently not to help you write new sentences with this word.
Jan
1
comment How to positively describe something, such as a war memorial, which doesn't invoke positive feelings?
@Graffito: What dialect is that? I've never encountered it. (I'm from the Upper Midwestern U.S., FWIW.)
Dec
27
answered Meaning of “in compliance with”
Dec
21
comment What's the right prosody/pronunciation in “possessive + gerund” constructions?
@BillJ: No worries. I think we now agree on all points, then. :-)
Dec
21
comment Why is the plural of reindeer sometimes “reindeer”?
Are you asking why the plural of deer is deer, and just using "reindeer" for your question to give it a seasonal touch? Or are you asking why reindeer follows the model of deer rather than forming its plural in -s?