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Dec
20
answered Which word is more appropriate to express “How it works”?
Dec
15
comment What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?
Also, for ostensibly, an actual assertion does not have to have been made; it may be that something was merely implied, or even simply that it was a natural inference that was then left uncorrected.
Dec
15
comment What is the difference between these “distancing expressions”?
For supposedly, I'm not sure about the "which I may or may not agree with" part. I wouldn't expect to hear supposedly for a claim that the speaker agrees with; I think it usually means that the speaker disagrees with it, though occasionally the speaker actually feels neutrally.
Dec
14
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
13
answered A question for train lovers (a specific part of a steam locomotive)
Nov
29
comment Word for Feeling That Something Is “Off” about a Person?
Creeped out? Weirded out? Put off?
Nov
29
answered When spelling, when to say 'double xx' and when 'x x'
Nov
24
comment Was West Germany commonly referred to as “Germany”?
I've never heard anyone refer to the U.S. as "North America". Can you give an example of this usage?
Nov
23
comment Teaching of smuh?
@CarlSmith: I dunno about "ever". Studies show that phonics-based instruction, where kids are taught how to pay close attention to how the sounds match the letters, is vastly superior to whole-word instruction, which hopes that kids will somehow pick it up on their own. So, while no one should want kids to learn the word smuh for its own sake, it might fit in a word list for sm-, -uh, and so on. (If it were a word.)
Nov
23
comment Can we say Copy-Right-Free instead of CopyLeft?
@user96711: You're really asking a legal question, not an English question; and I am not a lawyer, so you should the following as "random person on the Internet trying to be helpful", rather than as, y'know, legal advice. That said . . . you do not want to say "public domain", because that means that you are relinquishing your copyright completely; it's not compatible with "the only limitation is mentioning my name on there". It sounds like you want to license your work under the Creative Commons "Attribution" license (CC BY).
Nov
23
comment Can we say Copy-Right-Free instead of CopyLeft?
@user96711: You need to decide what you're O.K. with. When you say that "People are not supposed to develope a music", do you mean that you don't want people modifying your piece? Because if you declare it copyright-free, then it doesn't matter what you want -- you won't own the piece anymore, and you won't have the right to say that people shouldn't be modifying it.
Nov
23
answered Teaching of smuh?
Nov
23
revised Can we say Copy-Right-Free instead of CopyLeft?
added 210 characters in body
Nov
23
answered Can we say Copy-Right-Free instead of CopyLeft?
Nov
21
comment Word for a task which is flawed or doomed to failure but which you have to do anyway?
+1. Note that in Yourdon's original usage, "death march" actually did not specifically imply that the project was futile or that it was doomed to failure (or perceived as such). He distinguished several categories of death marches; some of the categories had this problem, and some did not. But, as with many books with catchy titles, the title has taken on a life of its own. (Another example is "ugly American", which now means the opposite of what it meant in the book The Ugly American.)
Nov
21
comment Complete the job, as directed. There is a comma. why?
The distinction isn't actually one of restrictiveness vs. nonrestrictiveness, but of attachment (scope): without the comma, "as directed" is a complement in the verb phrase, whereas with the comma, it is an adjunct modifying the entire sentence (cf. "As directed, you must complete the job").
Nov
21
awarded  Custodian
Nov
21
reviewed Approve Complete the job, as directed. There is a comma. why?
Nov
17
comment Single word for a person who want to learn new things
Are you specifically looking for a noun? If an adjective is O.K., then probably curious.