4,366 reputation
1325
bio website
location Seattle, WA
age 30
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen yesterday

HTML programmer. Skilled with Java scripts; over ten years' experience in Node.js. Some experience in C or C++.



(O.K., not really. If you want to know about me for real, just read through some of my answers and comments on Stack Overflow. But if this profile made just one person wince, it was totally worth it!   :-)



By the way — any code that I post here, is because I intend for others to be able to use it, and not necessarily just under the terms of CC-BY-SA 3.0. I can't say categorically that I cross-license all my code here into the public domain, because code in my answers is frequently a "derivative work" of code from the question, and of course I can't re-license OPs' work without their permission; but suffice it to say, if you take code that I post here and adapt it for use in a non-trivial program of which my code is a trivial or incidental piece, then you don't need to worry about my rights under CC-BY-SA.


Mar
24
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
+1. When I first read this page a few months ago, I was really put off by the tenor of a lot of your comments here; but then I clicked your links and was fully convinced by them, and the more I've thought about it since then, the angrier I've gotten about the "oll korrect" story. I mean, I realize that the word "OK" is not exactly a work of art, but it's one of American English's most universally successful cultural exports (which is really saying something), and it seems like a really low blow to deny its Native origin.
Mar
15
answered What does the phrase 'much the most" mean?
Mar
15
answered What sounds more natural in this case: as, since, or for?
Feb
23
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
+1, thanks! I ended up accepting ScotM's answer, and the software only lets me accept one; but I will probably be using some of these in the future, too. :-)
Feb
23
awarded  Scholar
Feb
23
accepted Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
Feb
21
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
10
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
10
comment Admitting a unique fixed point in math
@Mitch: Re: "dictionary words aren't (always) one-to-one replaceable with their definitions": That's true. And in fact, even in cases where admit actually does mean "to allow or concede as valid", the latter phrasing could be a bit awkward. ("I conceded the force of his argument as valid" is rather strange.) But surely a dictionary definition, in order to apply to a given sentence, must have something to do with the usage in that sentence. (Other than, "it's a definition for a different sense of the same word". ;-) )
Feb
10
comment Admitting a unique fixed point in math
@Mitch: Sorry, I don't understand what you're trying to say. I'm saying that this definition doesn't seem to make sense, because it takes a word that makes sense and defines it as not making sense.
Feb
10
comment Admitting a unique fixed point in math
@Robusto: As I said, I already tried it. "The contraction F concedes a unique fixed point as valid" sounds like gibberish to me.
Feb
10
comment Admitting a unique fixed point in math
I don't really understand this answer. The OP's sentence with admits sounds natural to me, whereas "the contraction F allows a unique fixed point as valid" sounds like gibberish. (And likewise with "concedes".)
Feb
10
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
@rogermue: Well, Pope also gave us "faint praise", and probably lots of other expressions that we wouldn't bat an eye at. (And, I mean, he also used plenty of normal words like the and of and lock.) But you're right -- I ended my question with an explanation of what the phrase meant, which I wouldn't have bothered to do if I had felt that this were an everyday expression that everyone understood today.
Feb
9
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
@Qsigma: There's no specific "the sentence [I] want to write" at the moment. I posted this question shortly after an instance where I wanted to use "break a butterfly on a wheel", but couldn't bring myself to do so; but I'm looking for alternatives in general, for the next time I need to write such a sentence. (And coincidentally, in the instance that led to this question, I did end up reworking it a bit and using the word "overkill". So I'm certainly not saying that the suggestion is garbage. But it's not perfect, either, and it's certainly not "a direct substitute".)
Feb
9
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
9
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
@Qsigma: Eh? "To be overkill" certainly is not a direct substitute. It has the right part of speech, but it takes the wrong subject.
Feb
9
comment Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
Thanks! Although "overkill" does seem to be attested as a verb, that use sounds very odd to me. In my own experience it is invariably a mass noun. (And I'm not specifically looking for an animal metaphor, no, though I'm not opposed to one!)
Feb
9
awarded  Student
Feb
9
asked Alternatives to “break a butterfly on a wheel”
Feb
8
comment how to properly use “that that” so as a listener/reader/speaker can comprehend the entire sentence without complication?
@PeterShor: Right. And even if it hadn't been completely ambiguous, it could still lead you down the garden path. ("He had a very difficult childhood, and I think that childhood is part of why he turned out the way he did.")