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2d
comment Colloquial English word for: a “Remote control”
Don't worry, I didn't think you did. :-)
2d
comment Uncountable noun examples
+1, but note that almost all of those words are also sometimes countable, with well-attested plurals. (I don't think I've ever heard rices, knowledges, angers, or evidences, but the rest are unexceptionable.)
2d
comment Colloquial English word for: a “Remote control”
For what it's worth, I think remote is also the most common in the U.S. (I haven't heard clicker used very often in real life, though there may be regional differences or something.)
May
19
comment Is “whom” correct in “I speak of him, whom is…”
@Catija: If the OP is trying to understand the rules for who vs. whom, then this is a reasonable question to ask. It's true that the sentence could be simplified in such a way as to eliminate the who(m), but then it wouldn't serve the OP's purpose of asking about the distinction.
May
19
answered Why is “grammar” spelt with an “A”?
May
19
comment “You belong to me” or “You belong with me”
@DavidK: Ooh, that's pleasant. "You belong to me" mostly reminds me of the song "Every Breath You Take", which is much darker.
May
16
comment Is there a word to (best) describe someone who sees and remembers every single thing?
From the Wikipedia article, though, it doesn't sound like a hyperthymestic is exactly "someone who sees and remembers every single thing"; for example, it notes that "Hyperthymestic individuals appear to have poorer than average memory for arbitrary information" (as opposed to autobiographical information). (I guess it depends what kind of "every single thing" the OP has in mind.)
May
5
comment “Programming” versus “programing”: which is preferred?
I think that stress is only a secondary factor (if that), after vowel quality; we don't double the consonant after a tense ("long") vowel, we do double it after a lax ("short") vowel, and we follow more-complex rules for reduced vowels. (With some caveats; for example, I think most dialects nowadays distinguish /ɝ/ from /ɚ/ only by stress, so <offered> vs. <referred> ends up being stress-driven.) So I suspect that the <programed> reflects a pronunciation /'pro.grəmd/.
Apr
27
comment Where did the term “Square Meal” come from?
I agree with Hot Licks. I also wouldn't bat an eye at, say, "I haven't had a square meal in days".
Apr
26
comment Possessive Pronouns Doubt
@tchrist: Re: "confusing possessive pronouns with possessive determiners": The term "possessive determiner" is relatively new -- they always used to be called "possessive pronouns" (or sometimes "possessive adjectives") -- and certain modern authorities, such as CGEL, argue that they are in fact pronouns.
Apr
26
comment Possessive Pronouns Doubt
@RandomCodemonkey: Ending in /s/: its. Ending in /z/: his, hers, ours, yours, theirs.
Apr
26
answered Possessive Pronouns Doubt
Apr
23
comment What's the word for “angry boredom”?
What do you mean, it "makes you so bored"? How can a simple fact, expressed as a brief sentence, induce boredom? (And what's "an enraged way" of being bored? Are you sure you understand what the words "bored" and "boredom" mean?)
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks! The "Other types of Moor" section is not really relevant to my question -- The Hound of the Baskervilles takes place in the "uplands" type of moor -- but the "Farming" section at the end is very helpful. +1 :-)
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks! I can only accept one answer, but -- +1. :-)
Apr
23
accepted What is a “moorland farmer”?
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Cool, thank you!
Apr
22
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
22
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks for your answer. So if I'm understanding correctly, the reason "moorland farmer" is not an oxymoron is twofold: firstly, that "moorland" doesn't necessarily imply that it's absolutely 100% uncultivated, and secondly, that a "farmer" doesn't necessarily have to cultivate his/her land, if (s)he's using it to pasture livestock. Do I have that right?
Apr
21
awarded  Nice Question