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6h
comment Possessive Pronouns Doubt
@tchrist: Re: "confusing possessive pronouns with possessive determiners": The term "possessive determiner" is relatively new -- they always used to be called "possessive pronouns" (or sometimes "possessive adjectives") -- and certain modern authorities, such as CGEL, argue that they are in fact pronouns.
17h
comment Possessive Pronouns Doubt
@RandomCodemonkey: Ending in /s/: its. Ending in /z/: his, hers, ours, yours, theirs.
17h
answered Consistency between noun and verb
18h
answered Possessive Pronouns Doubt
Apr
23
comment What's the word for “angry boredom”?
What do you mean, it "makes you so bored"? How can a simple fact, expressed as a brief sentence, induce boredom? (And what's "an enraged way" of being bored? Are you sure you understand what the words "bored" and "boredom" mean?)
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks! The "Other types of Moor" section is not really relevant to my question -- The Hound of the Baskervilles takes place in the "uplands" type of moor -- but the "Farming" section at the end is very helpful. +1 :-)
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks! I can only accept one answer, but -- +1. :-)
Apr
23
accepted What is a “moorland farmer”?
Apr
23
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Cool, thank you!
Apr
22
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
22
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
Thanks for your answer. So if I'm understanding correctly, the reason "moorland farmer" is not an oxymoron is twofold: firstly, that "moorland" doesn't necessarily imply that it's absolutely 100% uncultivated, and secondly, that a "farmer" doesn't necessarily have to cultivate his/her land, if (s)he's using it to pasture livestock. Do I have that right?
Apr
21
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
21
comment What is a “moorland farmer”?
I take it you haven't read the book? :-)
Apr
21
asked What is a “moorland farmer”?
Apr
19
revised Is it “I've heard the story told many times” or “I've heard the story being told many times”?
copy question into question
Apr
17
revised Is “I like dogs but cats” a valid sentence?
include question in question
Apr
15
comment “That” vs “Those” which to use after both a plural and a singular noun?
What makes you say that "'is due to' is not good English"? It sounds perfectly fine to me.
Apr
9
comment Are there exceptions to the “place yourself last” rule for listing people?
+1, but you left out something important: the OP's proposed wording is "between Anthony and I", rather than "between Anthony and me". Both have a long history, but traditional grammar rejects the former and allows only the latter (since "between" is a preposition; just we say "for me", not *"for I", traditional grammar demands "for Anthony and me" and "between Anthony and me"). "Between Anthony and me" is almost universally preferred in careful prose.
Mar
24
comment Where did the term “OK/Okay” come from?
+1. When I first read this page a few months ago, I was really put off by the tenor of a lot of your comments here; but then I clicked your links and was fully convinced by them, and the more I've thought about it since then, the angrier I've gotten about the "oll korrect" story. I mean, I realize that the word "OK" is not exactly a work of art, but it's one of American English's most universally successful cultural exports (which is really saying something), and it seems like a really low blow to deny its Native origin.
Mar
15
answered What does the phrase 'much the most" mean?