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2d
accepted Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
2d
comment Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
Having thought about this further, I think "flatten" can work as the verb, it just needs a little bit more detail. I think I'll go with flattenToSingleLine (or something along those lines). Thanks again!
Aug
30
comment Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
Thanks; so I guess your suggestion is replaceLineBreaks(msg)?
Aug
30
comment Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
Thanks for this suggestion. Unfortunately, I think that the term flatten has developed a fairly specific meaning in programming: we "flatten" hierarchical structures (such as nested lists or nested loops) by converting them into non-hierarchical structures, or at least by reducing the number of levels in the hierarchy. (For example, [1, 2, [3, 4], 5] would "flatten" to [1, 2, 3, 4, 5].) So something like flatten(msg) would probably be confusing.
Aug
30
comment Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
@HotLicks: Thanks for your suggestion. This is definitely an example of reformatting, but I don't think it's at all guessable what reformat(msg) would mean . . . :-/
Aug
30
asked Term for removing/replacing line-breaks
Aug
16
comment Is whiz deletion used with this sentence?
How did you decide that "I don't want to go to a place not nice" is correct?
Aug
15
comment Question from the GMAT test
@JoeBlow: OK, good, so you do understand. Now apply that understanding to the actual question, and you'll be golden. :-)
Aug
15
comment Question from the GMAT test
@JoeBlow: Your second comment really makes no sense. Do you think that "he walked out, leaving her alone with her thoughts" is "just plain wrong" because it has "he ... leaving"? Do you think that it should instead be "he walked out who leaves her alone with her thoughts"?
Aug
15
revised Question from the GMAT test
As Joe Blow points out, I was using "sentence" to refer to two different things.
Aug
15
comment Question from the GMAT test
@JoeBlow: Re: "sentence": fair enough -- I'll fix that wording -- but you are totally focusing on the wrong thing. (I think you haven't actually understood this answer.)
Aug
15
comment Question from the GMAT test
@JoeBlow: No, there's no rule whereby singular that alternates with plural which. The plural of "the book that we read together" is "the books that we read together"; the plural of "her book, which we read together" is "her books, which we read together".
Aug
15
answered Question from the GMAT test
Aug
15
comment Why “I didn't have the heart to tell him”?
But that's not what the expression means. "I didn't have the courage to tell him" has to do with avoiding an awkward situation and/or reprisal (your mention of an "uncomfortable truth" would be spot-on), whereas "I didn't have the heart to tell him" has to do with avoiding causing disappointment or sadness. Has the meaning of the expression changed over time? If so, why? (Is it due to a strange sort of influence from the other uses of "heart" that the OP refers to?)
Aug
9
answered Does “Anyone who does this, he will be punished severely” sound right?
Aug
9
comment Verbal phrase as object complement
@michael_timofeev: If native speakers regularly and intentionally use it in ordinary speech, isn't it "grammatically correct" by definition?
Aug
9
comment Name for literary device of changing person
@deadrat: Ah, I see. That explains why you're getting these bizarrely wrong results. A PNG shift is neither necessary nor sufficient for a sentence to have a different subject from the one before.
Aug
9
comment About “dumb” luck
+1. Note that "mindless luck" and "stupid luck" are also attested (albeit nowhere near as common). In some cases, it borders on hypallage.
Aug
9
comment Name for literary device of changing person
No, in the NIV translation there is only one shift, unless you think the sentence "I talked to her" demonstrates a mid-clause shift from first-person ("I") to third-person ("her"). (In the Hebrew you could make a case for a second shift, since the quotation is not explicitly marked as it is in the NIV.)
Aug
9
comment Name for literary device of changing person
Your description of Psalm 75 makes it sound like there are two shifts (from first-person to second-person, from second-person to third-person), but there is actually only one shift (from addressing G-d in the second person to referring to G-d in the third person).