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Apr
27
comment What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
@Omegacron Let's maybe not have that argument here? However, as a white male American citizen I feel that it is appropriate to hold the cops to a MUCH HIGHER standard of behavior than the people they are interacting with.
Apr
27
comment What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
That's a different thing. It is indeed the case that people with one black and one white parent often find themselves caught between two cultures, so from their perspective half-black is not the same as black. But white racists are equally prejudiced against both. (They might well be more prejudiced against mixed-race families, if they are the kind of racist who disapproves of miscegenation; but in terms of interacting with a dark-skinned stranger walking down the street, they won't bother asking about his or her parentage.)
Apr
27
comment What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
FYI, in terms of American racism, "half-black" is not a distinction that's made. It doesn't matter who your parents are, only what you look like.
Apr
27
comment What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
It is a risque joke, but (IMHO) it hit exactly the right note of laughing-because-otherwise-we'd-be-crying-and-drinking-heavily regarding police brutality in the USA.
Apr
27
comment What does “Your hair is so white now, it can talk back to police” mean?
Mr. Obama has been quoted a few times saying things like "I myself have been pulled over for driving while black -- before I was a senator" and "If I had a son I would worry about him getting shot by the police even though I'm the President". Personally, I'm not surprised he found it funny.
Apr
17
comment When is it appropriate to use 'admixture' rather than 'mixture'?
Admixture is rare compared to mixture; I would personally never use it, even in formal writing. To my ear it carries a connotation similar to adulterated, i.e. "some elements of the overall mixture shouldn't have been added", but I don't think that is what was meant in this quote.
Mar
25
answered Is it correct to say “The reason is because …”?
Mar
18
comment What is it called when something appears so obvious, no one expects it?
The airport in Atlanta has a display case, right by the security screening line, holding all the most ridiculous things they've confiscated from people who tried to carry them onto a plane, including several handguns, at least one machete, and a chain saw.
Mar
8
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
7
answered What is a non-gendered synonym for “macho”?
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
1
answered What is the English term for those who cannot part with their smartphones anywhere or at any time?
Nov
27
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
29
awarded  Yearling
Sep
15
comment What does “amletic” mean?
I observe that the construction "I have a doubt about X" [meaning "I have a question about X"] is already into variant-English territory; I've never heard native speakers of Am or BrEng say that.
Jul
30
answered A phrase for “extremely bad luck”
Jul
24
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
24
accepted Bonus points, only negative
Jul
24
comment Bonus points, only negative
@DaveMagner Hence 'additional demerits' instead of just 'demerits'. But that phrase has the connotations I want.
Jul
23
comment Bonus points, only negative
@djechlin This is actually for a book review, not for student work.