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Apr
28
comment the use of rob with cars
You could say "He stole the bank" if he physically removed the building from its location (unlikely, but there have been stranger heists), or if he somehow stole control of the bank corporation (I'm certain this has happened many times).
Apr
4
comment A strong antonym for “dictator”?
You might be looking for "first among equals".
Feb
21
comment Name for the difficulty of finding information you have no knowledge of
An idiomatic expression for this is "not knowing where to begin looking for an answer."
Dec
21
revised To avail of an opportunity
added 446 characters in body
Dec
21
revised To avail of an opportunity
added 446 characters in body
Dec
21
revised To avail of an opportunity
added 446 characters in body
Dec
20
comment The meaning of the word metal
Per FOLDOC, the original phrase was "bare metal" and I think it's probably meant to make you think of machine parts that haven't been polished and painted yet.
Dec
20
comment What is toilet?
I can think of a term to identify the appliance that is not euphemistic: the shitter. But this really only underscores your point.
Dec
20
comment Door in plural in English plus can we say math?
@kitsmala The book is incorrect. You should assume that all such rules have at least one exception.
Dec
12
comment Door in plural in English plus can we say math?
Note that maths is not the plural of anything; math and maths are both shorter synonyms for mathematics, and all three of them are non-count (i.e. they are neither singular nor plural, and cannot be pluralized). (Although, having said that, I wouldn't be at all surprised to learn that "a math" was a technical term for some sort of mathematical object (just as "algebra" vs "an algebra"), and in that sense, a count noun. Mathematicians love reusing words as names for things.)
Nov
30
comment Which is more wet: ‘moist’ or ‘damp’?
Note the etymologies. This is one of English's many, many pairs of Germanic and Latinic words with the same root meaning (holy/sacred, wood/forest, swine/pork, etc). Which doesn't mean there can't be a meaning difference in the modern language, but it does mean any such difference is fairly recent and (usually) quite small. The word pairs for animals, where one has come to refer exclusively to the live animal and its partner to the animal's meat prepared for eating, are the biggest such difference I can think of.
Sep
29
awarded  Yearling
Sep
25
answered An idiom for “striking unnecessarily hard when the opponent is already weakened”
Sep
14
comment Why the phrase “thunder and lightning”, and not “lightning and thunder”?
And because of your first bullet point, if a thunderstorm is approaching, you are likely to start hearing thunder before you start noticing lightning flashes.
Aug
4
awarded  Excavator
Aug
4
revised What's the difference between - and — in a phrase?
replace -- and ---- with proper unicode
Aug
4
suggested approved edit on What's the difference between - and — in a phrase?
Jul
31
awarded  Pundit
Jul
30
comment In Gary Bernhardt's talk about Ruby and JavaScript surprises, what does “wat” mean?
A useful metaphor, perhaps: "This is so unbelievably stupid that I have become more stupid just by learning about it."
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Answer