1,209 reputation
412
bio website owlfolio.org
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 36
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Apr 7 at 16:33

Hello, my name is Zachary Weinberg. I go by “Zack,” except on paper. Pleased to meet you.

I’m about thirty-five years old, and I grew up in the suburbs of Los Angeles, California. I do computer security research at CMU.

I AM NOT LOOKING FOR A JOB. DO NOT CONTACT ME WITH ANY SORT OF JOB OFFER. I regret the bluntness and ALLCAPSNESS of the previous statement, but this account has become a principal source of the recruitment spam I get, and anything short of a flat-out upfront NO is completely ineffective. *waves old man cane at clouds*


Apr
7
revised Why is this sentence incorrect?
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Apr
5
comment page : paginate :: paragraph :?
If you mean the process of deciding where to put the line breaks, that is called "line breaking" or "linebreaking" in typesetters' jargon. "Justification" is also sometimes used but strictly speaking that refers to the process of stretching spaces to make the right-hand margin a straight line. "Hyphenation" is the related process of deciding where within a word it is acceptable to split it across lines (when linebreaking would like to do so).
Apr
5
comment Is the word, ‘nerdocracy’ just a nonce word, or becoming current?
-ocracy has been highly productive all the way back to its Ancient Greek origins.
Mar
31
answered Why is this sentence incorrect?
Mar
31
comment Why is this sentence incorrect?
I don't recognize the terminology of the book you're quoting, but the grammarian in my head (who is frequently wrong, btw) thinks that my, Tim's, and the are all mutually exclusive options for the single particle that goes in the slot between "this is" and "book". In other words, you can't write "This is the my book" for the same reason you can't write "This is the a book".
Feb
3
comment “Too low for the price” or “too less for the price”
(2/2) If you are trying to convey what I think you are, the preferred expression in StdAmEng would be "Too little for the price."
Feb
3
comment “Too low for the price” or “too less for the price”
(1/2) This is dialect-dependent: in "Standard" American and British English one never modifies "less" with words like "too" or "very", but in (subcontinental) Indian English one does it all the time (or so I have observed).
Jan
26
comment What does “spam in a can” mean?
It is probably also relevant that SPAM is sold in cans (rather like sardines) and was a staple of American military rations during and immediately after the Second World War (everyone involved in the "space race" from the USA side had probably eaten these rations at least once).
Jan
22
comment I wonder the differences between until now and so far
When they are used interchangeably, "until now" must go after the thing that it refers to; "so far" can be before or after it. ("Alice has been responsible so far", "Alice has been responsible until now", "So far Alice has been responsible", but *"Until now Alice has been responsible"). To my ear, "until now" also weakly suggests that something has changed, whereas "so far" has no such implication at all.
Dec
21
comment Meaning of “It flaming spread” in a Tolkien poem
I don't see how the existence of prose examples of the same stylistic tactic precludes this example being poetic license. I think you're being too prescriptive. Again.
Dec
21
comment Meaning of “It flaming spread” in a Tolkien poem
It's poetic license because it's a move away from "natural" prose which serves poetic goals (the meter and the internal rhyme). Poetic license doesn't have to involve the formally ungrammatical.
Dec
21
answered Meaning of “It flaming spread” in a Tolkien poem
Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
8
comment What do we call something that is not toll-free?
I've also heard people use "toll call" to refer specifically to what is officially called a "premium rate telephone number", i.e. a call billed at even higher rates than normal long-distance calls, with some of the money going to the business whose number it is.
Nov
18
comment “Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?
Upon further reflection, I think you may want to use the word review rather than recommendation. This is the term used in many similar contexts, e.g. Amazon product pages have customer-written reviews of the product.
Nov
15
comment “Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?
In SWE that is not how you would say that, and I am now more-or-less convinced that "recommendation" is not the word you want, but I'm still not sure what you really want to say. It would help if you specified the type of work you have in mind -- construction? bespoke goods? assembly line? hotel reception? medical? what? -- as it may be described differently in SWE based on that. It would also help if you specified your audience and your native dialect.
Nov
14
comment “Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?
I don't understand the distinction you are making. You want to recommend a work by a person to people who want similar work = is that not the same as recommending the person as skilled at this particular type of work?
Nov
14
revised “Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?
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Nov
14
revised “Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?
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