151 reputation
5
bio website
location United Kingdom
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Feb 4 at 19:38
I like Monaco the band, but not Monaco the font. I have not yet been to the principality.

Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Feb
4
comment Identifying British accents
@Cerberus sorry, no offence to the character of Dr Frasier Crane or Kelsey Grammar as they both have wonderfully sonorous accents. However, Fraiser must have been referenced at some point (this question was asked over 3 years ago) & the series dealt very badly with British accents
Jan
31
comment Why are there so few English words that begin with the letter X?
@StoneyB Maybe I'm weird, but I do try to pronounce words starting with x as /ks/. It maddens me when I hear Xavier as 'eks-avier'. Maybe he should be called 'has a new house'!
Jan
10
awarded  Critic
Jan
10
comment Term for a powerful personal computer?
yeah, I was thinking about Ars as well. you could check out their forums, too for what users call their own boxen. Anyway, most terms I can think of are two words, or hyphenated.
Aug
17
comment When do you use “learnt” and when “learned”?
would it be a grave on learnèd rather than an acute?
Aug
17
comment “Mold” vs. “Mould”
@GEdgar ah! John Brown's body lies a-crumbling in the grave. I previously thought "a-mold'ring" meant there was fungus growing on it.
Aug
12
awarded  Commentator
Aug
12
comment Why is “bicycle” pronounced differently from other obviously related words?
I've never heard bahy-si-kuhl, only bye-si-kul/bye-sik-ul
Aug
12
answered “Mold” vs. “Mould”
Feb
12
comment Why is “bloody” considered obscene in the UK but not in the US?
I would say only the type of people who write letters to the Daily Telegraph newspaper know where 'bloody' comes from. I think one reason it is used less often in the US because the vowel sounds don't fit most US accents.
Sep
30
awarded  Teacher
Sep
29
comment Examples of different roots (and different meanings) coming to be spelled the same
@Ex-user: indeed, I don't see anything unkind or cutting, but neither do I see the relevance of your first comment or indeed the relevance of the lack of current usage. My response to that first comment would have been "cool story, bro". In fact a better comment would have been to point out that @Seamus used the plural phenomena when he should have used the singular phenomenon.
Sep
29
comment American vs. British English: meaning of “One hundred and fifty”
In darts you need the 'and' to give the score a more pleasing rhythm. One hundred and eighty!
Sep
29
comment Is “How and why child is become criminal” proper English?
Going along the tangent of artistic variation and great title, I would understand "is become" to indicate a complete and total change, i.e. the child can do nothing but commit crime. Though an article would be required before 'child'. Then again perhaps that's just me thinking the archaic form always exaggerates things because it is usually used in modern language for emphasis or to add colour.
Sep
29
answered Does “gay” still include the meaning “merry”?
Sep
29
comment Does “gay” still include the meaning “merry”?
If they were going to replace "gay", I would have thought "grand" would fit better than "great".
Sep
29
comment Identifying British accents
Definitely, do not use Frasier in your research unless you want to try to map the accents of Daphne's relatives and see just how far from Manchester they all must have lived.
Sep
29
comment Identifying British accents
In my view, Mishal Husain, Evan Davies, Lizzie Greenwood-Hughes and Alice Roberts have quite good examples of neutral accents. I enjoy listening to them more than people from my own region.
Sep
29
comment Identifying British accents
I think there are a few small areas dotted all over England which produce accents such that the hearer does not automatically think "he's from Birmingham", or "she's a geordie", or "he's a cockney".